How low can the step up be - Home Theater Forum and Systems - HomeTheaterShack.com

 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 7 Old 08-02-07, 06:27 PM
jgraceoma
Inactive
 
Posts: n/a
How low can the step up be

Basically building a home theater room that will have two rows of theater seats. The room has eight foot ceilings. Behind my second row of seats will be a pool table followed by a bar. So the step up will not only be for the seats, but for the seats and everything behind it.

How low can I go with the step up so that I can see the screen over the first rows heads, and also give pool players, etc., enough room not to feel like they are going to bump their head on the ceiling.
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 7 Old 08-02-07, 08:02 PM
HTS Hillbilly
HTS Administrator
 
Sonnie's Avatar
I'm a redneck!
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: L.A. (Lower Alabama)
Posts: 22,555
My System
Re: How low can the step up be

Moved to Design and Construction.

Welcome to the Shack!

This might somewhat depend on the height of your screen. My screen is about 3' from the floor and my riser is 12" high. I would not want it any lower for back row viewing. That only leaves you roughly 7', which is no doubt low. You might could test it at 6" and see if you'll see the screen okay. Obviously the lower the screen, the higher the riser will need to be.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.


PremierHomeAudio: Denon, Marantz, Onkyo, Yamaha, Sony, Pioneer, Def Tech and more. Shoot me a PM!
Sonnie is offline  
post #3 of 7 Old 08-02-07, 10:52 PM
Australian Contingent
Platinum Supporter
John Simpson
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Hobart, Tasmania
Posts: 246
Re: How low can the step up be

Yep, Sonnie's right -- testing is the best way to go before you commit.

It will also depend on the angle you recline your chairs, and your preferred "head tilt". I was in one of those fancy cinemas recently with the reclining chairs and found that having the back recline was more effort on my neck than not.
John Simpson is offline  
post #4 of 7 Old 08-03-07, 03:15 PM
Elite Shackster
 
salvasol's Avatar
David
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Fontana, CA
Posts: 3,251
Re: How low can the step up be

Quote:
jgraceoma wrote: View Post
Basically building a home theater room that will have two rows of theater seats. The room has eight foot ceilings. Behind my second row of seats will be a pool table followed by a bar. So the step up will not only be for the seats, but for the seats and everything behind it.
How low can I go with the step up so that I can see the screen over the first rows heads, and also give pool players, etc., enough room not to feel like they are going to bump their head on the ceiling.
Are you building a room from the ground up or just converting a room into a HT??? ... if is the first, after reading your post it seems that you already poured the concrete on the floor, Right??? .... if you haven't, it will be a good idea to lower the front instead of building a riser ...

If you already have the floor ... do what the others says: test, test, test ... I think it doesn't matter how long the riser is ... but remember you will need something strong that can hold some weight
salvasol is offline  
post #5 of 7 Old 08-03-07, 09:35 PM
Australian Contingent
Platinum Supporter
John Simpson
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Hobart, Tasmania
Posts: 246
Re: How low can the step up be

One thing the just occurred to me about your step: in Australia we have building guidelines that stipulate the rise of a step (outside that and you're breaching the rules). Do you have something similar in the US?
John Simpson is offline  
post #6 of 7 Old 08-03-07, 10:24 PM
Elite Shackster
 
salvasol's Avatar
David
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Fontana, CA
Posts: 3,251
Re: How low can the step up be

Quote:
John Simpson wrote: View Post
One thing the just occurred to me about your step: in Australia we have building guidelines that stipulate the rise of a step (outside that and you're breaching the rules). Do you have something similar in the US?
Yes, there is rules to build steps, but those applies to stairways, driveways, etc. I don't think there is rules to build a step on a home theater riser

Most cities have different rules for building and safety ...
salvasol is offline  
post #7 of 7 Old 08-05-07, 02:01 AM
Shackster
John
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 66
Re: How low can the step up be

Here is a link to a calculator I found in a thread on another forum. http://www.cinegi.com/cgi-bin/riser.cgi

When using this tool make sure you realize that the front row height is to the top of the head and the back row height is to eye level. Assuming the seats are the same size the back row measurements should be about 5" shorter that the front.

Some other comments from that same thread -
A good rule of thumb is that you eyeballs should be a 1/3 of the way up from the bottom of the screen. This is just a guide based on a comfortable angle to view a movie. Some people may like the screen a little higher and lean their seat back, but most people don't want the movie fully reclined.

Some ways to improve Line Of Sight (LOS) in low ceiling applications:
1) Choose taller seats in the rear row(s)
Continental is one company that makes a "tall" chair to match a popular model that is like 5-6" higher than the matching regular height model that we would use in the front. This way the seated height is higher, but the riser height and standing headroom are still acceptable.

2) Make the front row the "money" seats, and choose non-reclining chairs for the riser that can be placed closer to the front row.
Irwin and a few others make nice non-recline chairs that are exact replicas of commercial theater chairs in the industrial upholstery or finer finishes. If you match the upholstery these chairs do not look out of place, and kids love them.

3) Raise the height of the screen a few more inches
If the rear row are your money seats, you will want to LOS to be as close to perfect as possible. You don't want the front rows to be craning their necks up either, nobody wants a stiff neck after a movie. Be careful how much you modify this dimension.

Depending on ceiling height, basement theaters will get usually get a 5-8" step up riser or a 10-15" two step riser, and even with the creative planning for the seating and screen height, the LOS is sometimes slightly compromised.
owlfan12000 is offline  
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
low , step

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now




PLEASE COMPLETE ALL REQUIRED FIELDS BELOW... THANKS!

REQUIRED FIELDS ON THIS PAGE
YOU MUST COMPLETE ALL OF THESE

Username
Password
Confirm Password
Email Address
Confirm Email Address
Random Question
Random Question #2




User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
PLEASE READ BELOW PRIOR TO ENTERING AN EMAIL ADDRESS!

ATTENTION!

YOU MUST ACTIVATE YOUR ACCOUNT!

Activation requires you reply to an email we will send you after you register... if you do not reply to this email, you will not be able to view certain areas of the forum or certain images... nor will you be able download software.

AN INVALID EMAIL ADDRESS WILL CAUSE YOUR ACCOUNT TO BE DELETED!

See our banned email list here: Banned Email List

We DO NOT respond to spamcop, boxtrapper and spamblocker emails... please add @hometheatershack DOT com to your whitelist prior to registering or you will get nowhere on your registration.


Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML is not allowed!
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 


For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome