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post #21 of 31 Old 07-08-13, 02:40 PM
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Re: Tinnitus (ears ring) subwoofers and electronics

No authority here, but a Mayo Clinic audiologist once told me the main things to watch out for are impact noises - fireworks, gunshots, etc. - and sustained high levels like rock concerts, factories, industrial environments, etc. Airshows, runways, racetracks, obviously bad. Headphones - be careful.

The Etymotic ER-20 plugs work well for concerts. They are not exactly flat, but after a few minutes to acclimatize, the sound is pretty good, and my ears never ring any extra even after a loud show when using them. In an industrial environment, I would use something that filters the high frequencies a lot more.

On an encouraging note, I got some tinnitus fairly early from playing in rock bands and going to concerts, but since being more careful and using earplugs religiously, it has not gotten worse over time, even though I am pushing... Well, we will not go into that.

The 80 dB to 85 dB listening range (short-term averaging) is actually fairly loud and is considered very safe for a few hours a week - two or three movies? And that is where the louder passages end up, most movies have an average overall level that is probably more in the mid-70 dB range. There is a lot of dynamic range though, with systems capable of high SPL's it might only take a few loud effects to strain the ears a bit. I also doubt it is the subwoofer levels that are the cause of the ear ringing. More than likely it is the higher frequencies of the sounds that feel like a LF impact. Then some of us are more sensitive than others, that is a possibility too.

Do any of the commonly available listening mode processors have a peak limiting function to guard against overly loud impacts for those who feel the need for that protection?

Sure hope you can find a listening mode that is satisfying and still protects those little hearing sensors for future use!
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post #22 of 31 Old 07-08-13, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
AudiocRaver wrote: View Post
No authority here, but a Mayo Clinic audiologist once told me the main things to watch out for are impact noises - fireworks, gunshots, etc. - and sustained high levels like rock concerts, factories, industrial environments, etc. Airshows, runways, racetracks, obviously bad. Headphones - be careful.

The Etymotic ER-20 plugs work well for concerts. They are not exactly flat, but after a few minutes to acclimatize, the sound is pretty good, and my ears never ring any extra even after a loud show when using them. In an industrial environment, I would use something that filters the high frequencies a lot more.

On an encouraging note, I got some tinnitus fairly early from playing in rock bands and going to concerts, but since being more careful and using earplugs religiously, it has not gotten worse over time, even though I am pushing... Well, we will not go into that.

The 80 dB to 85 dB listening range (short-term averaging) is actually fairly loud and is considered very safe for a few hours a week - two or three movies? And that is where the louder passages end up, most movies have an average overall level that is probably more in the mid-70 dB range. There is a lot of dynamic range though, with systems capable of high SPL's it might only take a few loud effects to strain the ears a bit. I also doubt it is the subwoofer levels that are the cause of the ear ringing. More than likely it is the higher frequencies of the sounds that feel like a LF impact. Then some of us are more sensitive than others, that is a possibility too.

Do any of the commonly available listening mode processors have a peak limiting function to guard against overly loud impacts for those who feel the need for that protection?

Sure hope you can find a listening mode that is satisfying and still protects those little hearing sensors for future use!
In my case I tested the sub with a 16hz CD and the spl reached 100dB. The walls and windows were rattling. I'm not sure if that is what took me down.
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post #23 of 31 Old 07-10-13, 11:43 PM
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I have had ringing in my ears for many years. It doesn't bother me normally but I notice it if its really quiet. I have had multiple hearing tests and have great hearing. I do notice though as I get older it seems like loud music in a car is more annoying. I still love firing up my home theater though.

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post #24 of 31 Old 07-11-13, 08:06 AM
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Re: Tinnitus (ears ring) subwoofers and electronics

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I have had ringing in my ears for many years. It doesn't bother me normally but I notice it if its really quiet. I have had multiple hearing tests and have great hearing. I do notice though as I get older it seems like loud music in a car is more annoying. I still love firing up my home theater though.
Yeah I have a hissing sound that can be annoying in a quiet environment. I still enjoy my home theater but I am now more careful on the volume although I never have it loud to begin with.
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post #25 of 31 Old 07-11-13, 01:49 PM
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Re: Tinnitus (ears ring) subwoofers and electronics

Quote:
AudiocRaver wrote: View Post
No authority here, but a Mayo Clinic audiologist once told me the main things to watch out for are impact noises - fireworks, gunshots, etc. - and sustained high levels like rock concerts, factories, industrial environments, etc. Airshows, runways, racetracks, obviously bad. Headphones - be careful.

The Etymotic ER-20 plugs work well for concerts. They are not exactly flat, but after a few minutes to acclimatize, the sound is pretty good, and my ears never ring any extra even after a loud show when using them. In an industrial environment, I would use something that filters the high frequencies a lot more.

On an encouraging note, I got some tinnitus fairly early from playing in rock bands and going to concerts, but since being more careful and using earplugs religiously, it has not gotten worse over time, even though I am pushing... Well, we will not go into that.

The 80 dB to 85 dB listening range (short-term averaging) is actually fairly loud and is considered very safe for a few hours a week - two or three movies? And that is where the louder passages end up, most movies have an average overall level that is probably more in the mid-70 dB range. There is a lot of dynamic range though, with systems capable of high SPL's it might only take a few loud effects to strain the ears a bit. I also doubt it is the subwoofer levels that are the cause of the ear ringing. More than likely it is the higher frequencies of the sounds that feel like a LF impact. Then some of us are more sensitive than others, that is a possibility too.

Do any of the commonly available listening mode processors have a peak limiting function to guard against overly loud impacts for those who feel the need for that protection?

Sure hope you can find a listening mode that is satisfying and still protects those little hearing sensors for future use!
When you say it is most likely the higher frequencies of the sounds that feel like a LF impact. Do you mean the dialog and other sounds of the main speakers that mix with the sub?
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post #26 of 31 Old 04-02-16, 03:06 PM
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Re: Tinnitus (ears ring) subwoofers and electronics

Hi, I came across this thread whilst searching for hearing loss associated with sub woofers. I recently developed a sudden hearing loss, just woke up with it. Sadly it never fully recovered and I now have a classic noise-induced hearing loss dip on the audiogram between about 2k and 4khz.

I've been searching for an explanation as I couldn't for the life or me figure out what could have caused it. I only recalled playing my car stereo loud a few weeks before it happened, but that seemed like a pretty unsatisfactory explanation.

Reading this and other threads, I'm now starting to think my home cinema system caused the hearing loss. I added a second sub the weekend before it happened. I have one sub at the front of the room and one at the back, but the back one sits under a coffee table immediately behind my listening position.

I have played movie 'loud' but not as loud as say a loud club or bar music, or the local iMax. I hadn't even thought of the sub as a concern. But I am wondering if the position of the second sub so close behind me has somehow taken the sub base into damage territory without me noticing? The hearing loss has been a devastating blow and I'm simply struggling to believe I could have blown my ears so easily, but this is literally the only thing I can think of, and the correlation in terms of timing is too strong to ignore.
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post #27 of 31 Old 04-02-16, 09:44 PM
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Re: Tinnitus (ears ring) subwoofers and electronics

I had a very loud competition system in my Subaru for 3yrs...Ringing is now permanent but not loud.. I do play soft music at night to help me sleep... I have to wonder how it affects those Competition bass heads that hear sound pressure in the 150-160 db levels for years... I think it will finally cause CTE brain injury just like football impacts....
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post #28 of 31 Old 04-02-16, 11:36 PM
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Re: Tinnitus (ears ring) subwoofers and electronics

Quote:
RTS100x5 wrote: View Post
I had a very loud competition system in my Subaru for 3yrs...Ringing is now permanent but not loud.. I do play soft music at night to help me sleep... I have to wonder how it affects those Competition bass heads that hear sound pressure in the 150-160 db levels for years... I think it will finally cause CTE brain injury just like football impacts....
That would not be the least bit surprising. I dread the day when the producers of large speakers and subwoofers start getting sued for making "dangerous products."
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post #29 of 31 Old 04-04-16, 09:38 AM
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Re: Tinnitus (ears ring) subwoofers and electronics

Tinnitus begins long after the first tinitus.

The damages are caused to your vibratiles cells at the end of your auditive nerve into your ears. Everytime a loud sound or long exposure to loud sound occures it hurts those cells. One day the eyelashes at the surface of those cells collapse and you lost earing a specific FR. There is 3 layers of cells the first are specialized in the most important FR to the language (the third is for bass). Once dead those cells are not regenerated they are like neurons. The second layer try to compensate it and it is the reason why at the beginning of the tinnitus it seems to diminish and you think that you are safe. But it is not the case because your brain searchs for the lost signal and compensate it by a phantom sound issh at the precise FR lost: the tinnitus. Tinnitus dose not exist for real, it comes from the brain. Once installed, impossible to educate the brain not to induce it. My investigations tells me that any attemp to cure the tinnitus must begin very soon after the first signs. 18- 24 months later it is too late. During this delay it seems that some professional audiologist could by a costly treatment educate the brain not the induce the sound. I never tried it. It was too late for me.

I am an audiophile and a hunter. When I was young (before 26) I practiced skeet with protectors but no protections for my ears in the forest of course. I went to discotec and bars to dance a lot. One day, one shot of my companion hit my left ear and tinnitus bigan. Since then, I live with it. Some day I would like to destroy my ears. Others I am fine. When I listen music of movie, a certain level (60-65db), I hear 100% of the spectrum. But in a silence room and a quiet conversation, I lost 20% of my left ear and 10 of my right. Salt, alcool, fatigue increase the tinnitus among other things (stupidities for instance!)

So what happens to you was prepared long time ago.

Hope that helps.
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post #30 of 31 Old 04-09-16, 09:56 PM
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Sorry to hear you have tinnitus from electronics. That sucks, but I have had tinnitus since i was 4. And i can say that the ringing is there all the time and has been the same since i have been a kid. So i manage it by having sound constantly play around me. Music, tv shows, fan at night. So i feel ya. I dont know which is worse, tinnitus caused by sound or having it 24/7 like i do, i mean like to mask mine i do sounds. So find something that helps manage yours. Good luck

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