Display Types - Home Theater Forum and Systems - HomeTheaterShack.com

View Poll Results: What Video display device gives the best picture
CRT 46 42.59%
LCD 10 9.26%
Plasma 17 15.74%
Projectors 19 17.59%
DLP 16 14.81%
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post #1 of 26 Old 06-05-06, 08:33 PM Thread Starter
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Display Types

What type of display device do you think give the best picture and perform the best?
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post #2 of 26 Old 06-05-06, 09:03 PM
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Re: Display Types

I know that LCDs still have color problems (black) and contrast ratio problems. Plasma's are still so rare for 1080p and have a bad wearout mechanism. So it is still my understanding that the 1080 resolution huge 3 eye monster, 9" CRTs, projector is/was the best (Sony Qualia) until the $8000 Sony VPL-VW100, aka Ruby, came along to challenge it.

Quote:
The VPL-VW100 is Sony’s second-generation 1080p SXRD™ front projector. It delivers superior 1080p performance at a breakthrough price ($9,999) that should obliterate the current pricing structure of 720p and 1080p projectors. It includes an innovative dynamic iris to increase image contrast, but even without that technology it has the best full-field contrast ratio that I have ever measured for a fixed-pixel projector. The code name for the Sony VPL-VW100 was Ruby, and this Ruby is a gem.


Full HD 1920 x 1080 SXRD™ Panel (0.61”)
Up to 15,000:1 Contrast Ratio (with Advanced Iris function on)
ARC-F (All Range Crisp Focus) Lens
1080p Input
Pure Xenon Lamp (400W)
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post #3 of 26 Old 06-06-06, 01:38 AM
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Re: Display Types

Not everyone is completely happy with the Ruby. IIRC, there are alignment issues. But it's significantly more affordable than other 1080p projectors that I'm aware of. CRT projectors have the best picture quality, but are probably the worst in terms of dealing with them. Large, noisy, hot, niche-supported. LCD is the best option for the price conscious. DLP gives better quality but is still more expensive. A tiny SED projector will be coming out, but it's not suitable for home theater. I suspect SED will be the technology to beat once it does arrive, although it will be for flat-screen displays before projectors.
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post #4 of 26 Old 06-08-06, 01:33 PM
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Re: Display Types

You forgot 3 chip DLP. Definately rivals CRT in my opinion.
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post #5 of 26 Old 06-21-06, 12:57 PM
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Re: Display Types

I don't know if projectors give the best performance or not, but they get my vote for WOW factor. That will be my next upgrade.
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post #6 of 26 Old 06-24-06, 03:02 PM
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Lightbulb Re: Display Types

Quote:
What type of display device do you think give(s) the best picture and perform(s) the best
What I think only works for me and my specific lifestyle, room, viewing habits, desired screen size, etc. Acknowledging that, I value image quality much more when watching movies rather than TV programs. Therefore, front projection is my prefered display type. This necessitates absolute light control and appropriate viewing environment conditions. Since movies are my priority, the system only needs to provide about 12 to 14 fL of image brightness for a reference picture. This will suffice for digital cinema as well. Front projection is a two-piece display system and the screen must be included when specifying what's best in this category.

Film has a much broader color gamut than any type of video display available. CRT projectors have many qualities that are admired by experts in the field of reference imaging. With HDTV and digital cinema on the increase, CRT color gamut will be restrictive. I would look for a projector that can provide both NTSC and HDTV color gamuts, convincing black levels, minimum 10 bit gray scale, and good shadow detail. I would also prefer to have a constant image height system, so 1080p would be required for projector resolution. For CIH Cinemascope (2.35:1) image widths, 720p is simply unacceptable for sufficient size without visible pixel structure or softening of the image. I am looking forward to Joe Kane's 1080p Samsung single-chip DLP to be demonstrated at CEDIA EXPO in September. Joe wants to see it shipping by December, but that's up to Samsung. As of this last month, I only know of one 3-chip 1080p DLP on the market.

The most detailed and authoritative analysis and comparison of generic display types I'm aware of is the display shoot-out series from Widescreen Review, by Dr. Raymond Soneira. Here's the link to the material: http://displaymate.com/shootout.html . Dr. Soneira does not evaluate any front projection displays in the series, but has much to say about general imaging science principles and generic CRT, plasma, DLP, LCD and LCoS characteristics.

My advice for someone truly interested in the best display, is to find a home theater professional who is trained by the Imaging Science Foundation, understands viewing environment issues, has at least 3 years of imaging industry experience and can provide at least 4 client references. Many home theater professionals come from an audio background and understand too little about imaging science and display standards. Avoid such people on this topic. Find out if your selected professional will contract for just consulting time at an hourly rate. There may also be a trip charge. Arrange for an appointment to evaluate your lifestyle issues and room. Ideally, he should be able to see either the room, or blueprints, should the room not be built yet. This will save the consumer a lot of time when evaluating what type of display to purchase, how to provide the right viewing environment conditions, and dedicated or multi-use room design elements.

Best regards and beautiful pictures,
Alan Brown, President
CinemaQuest, Inc.
ISF, THX, SMPTE, CEDIA

"Advancing the art and science of electronic imaging"
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post #7 of 26 Old 07-06-06, 09:23 AM
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Re: Display Types

I have seen a fully tweaked G90 and even a Barco Cine9, and my fully tweaked Ruby can easily go head-to-head with those, and even do alot of things better, particularly with HD sources.

My best friend is using a Sony G90, and he comes at my place to see each new HD-DVD and Blu-Ray disk when I get them... He prefers the Ruby with true HD. With standard 480i DVDs, it's really a wash IMHO.

To each is own preferences. Some people prefer CRTs, others 3 chips DLPs or 3 chips 1080p SXRD. There is nothing perfect on the market right now.

Pick your poison.

And don't tell me about dealer's showrooms, please... OOTB, all the CRTs are AWFUL! They need alot of tweakings to perform. The Ruby is also like that. Putting it on a ceiling in a showroom w/o careful tweaking is not the way to look at this projector.

BTW, fixing the convergence on a Ruby is really simple, if you have that "problem". You send it to Sony and 1 week after it's back with the problem solved. No biggie for me. And it's not drifting away after awhile like CRTs... It stays like that for ever.

Brightness compression is also easily fixed with a simple custom gamma curve with Sony's ImageDirector. You can also easily bring the color decoder back on track to rec 709 and rec 601 with the right tools.

Last edited by ALevesque; 07-06-06 at 09:36 AM.
post #8 of 26 Old 07-08-06, 12:42 AM
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Re: Display Types

Alain,

Your post sure makes me want to look into a Ruby projector.

As been said here, there is no "perfect" display.

I do think we're heading in the right direction with the LED DLP that Samsung is bringing out in a few weeks/months. It seems that DLP has better ANSI contrast and its likely that the rainbow problem has been worked out.
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post #9 of 26 Old 07-08-06, 08:34 AM
 
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Re: Display Types

Quote:
ALevesque wrote:
.

BTW, fixing the convergence on a Ruby is really simple, if you have that "problem". You send it to Sony and 1 week after it's back with the problem solved. No biggie for me. And it's not drifting away after awhile like CRTs... It stays like that for ever.

Brightness compression is also easily fixed with a simple custom gamma curve with Sony's ImageDirector. You can also easily bring the color decoder back on track to rec 709 and rec 601 with the right tools.
Alain, I've used your message not to pick on Sony but the industry as a whole.
Having spent $10k on a projector consumers should expect to have a performance that meets an industry 'standard', and not have to have off color performance and convergence issues. For example when I go out to buy a car I expect to have it meet the mpg specs without having to buy special tools or have a calibrater come out to the house to fix it. The only projector I'm aware of that came calibrated was the Joe Kane supported model from Samsung.
We, the consumer, should demand and deserve better than this.
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post #10 of 26 Old 07-08-06, 08:45 AM
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Re: Display Types

Quote:
Phil M wrote:
Having spent $10k on a projector consumers should expect to have a performance that meets an industry 'standard', and not have to have off color performance and convergence issues.
I totally agree with you. But have you ever seen a Barco Cine9 or a Sony G90 brand new, OOTB? It's AWFUL! And for the price they were going a couple of years ago, it's unbelievable.

It took me 6 hours to calibrate my Ruby fully, after a 1 week trip at Sony to fix the minor misconvergence problem I had (and shipping was paid by Sony). My unit was one of the 1st batch on the market.

Ideally, the projector should reach our home perfectly calibrated, OOTB. But when it is perfectly calibrated, then it's alot dimmer and not really good in a showroom. Manufacturers want you to buy a projector, and usually the brighter projector with more saturated colors (I mean that red and yellow are usually way off here!) will be the biggest seller. So if your greyscale is properly done, and colors are back on track and matching the standards, then this projector will be alot less bright, colors will be less saturated, and then a really hard sale for the dealer (compared to the non calibrated projector in the same room).

Manufacturers just want you to buy the projector, after that, they don't really care what happens. Sad but true.
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