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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since about 3 years now, camcorders and cameras can record 1080 x 1920 / 60 p MPEG-4/AVC/H.264 video files at 28 Mbps (.m2ts, once 'imported'). Such video files can be of quite impressive quality on a good 16:9 display! Really something worthwhile the quality of a good HT setup! That format, I think, was eventually part of the 'AVCHD 2.0' or 'AVCHD progressive' standard.

I'm now requesting a little help from others with experience with this video format. A few questions:

1- Camcorder form Panasonic such as the TM-700 (2010) and the TM-900 (2011) were using this format before it was called 'AVCHD progressive' or 'AVCHD 2.0'. Is it fully compatible with the new 'AVCHD progressive' (or 'AVCHD 2.0') standard?

2- Once edited, 1080 x 1920 / 60p video files are not conveniently played back with the camcorder/camera, and they can be difficult to read smoothly with a number of computer programs / Blu-ray player / media players. As an example, such files from a 2011 Panasonic camcorder will be read correctly using Sony 2011 Blu-ray players (...380, ...580) from: a) hard disc drive or USB key (via USB), b) DVD-R (but not from the 'start' of the disc), c) BD-R. But they are not played smoothly from a media player such as the LaCie LaCinema mini (2011). However, 1080 x 1920 / 60p files (at the same bitrate and all...) from a Sony camera will play nicely from that same LaCie media player and Sony Blu-ray players. (The only difference is that the sound is AC-3 2.0 with the Sony camera, AC-3 5.1 from the Panasonic camcorder). Using a computer, the Panasonic files will play nicely using Panasonic own software (HD Writer AE 3.0), but not so nicely with the VLC media player software or other similar softwares. It really seems that 1080 x 1920 / 60p files are 'hard to read', or were hard to read on 2011 equipment !

Any advice? What current media-players, Blu-ray players, software will play those 1080 x 1920 / 60p video files correctly? Which Panasonic / Samsung (if any) / LG (if any) / Oppo Blu-ray players? ( Look to me that it is still very difficult to know for sure just from reading the specs... ).

3-About long term preservation... what would be the better option? Hard disc drives and/or optical discs (BD-R / DVD-R)?

4-What editing video software would you recommend on a computer running on Windows; the Panasonic HD Writer AE 3.0 is ok as a basic tool, but has limited capabilities...

Thank you for sharing your experience with me...
 

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Can't help you on 1 through 3. Sony Vegas Pro is hard to beat for video editing on a PC, but not cheap. Retail is $699, but it can be found for $370 or so, don't know how that works re your budget. Learning curve not all that bad for the capability. There's a YouTube video for anything you can think of doing.

I almost tried LIVES, open source and free but Linux only BUT they say you can run it with AV Linux on a bootable USB - that could get messy, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As a follow-up, the following info might be useful for others ...

I did get finally the Corel VideoStudio Pro X7 software, which can handle 1080/60p files, with good to excellent results. Some video effects will actually degrade the picture quality (but this is normal I guess), editing the audio is somewhat limited and problematic, and once in a while the software will crash, but overall, considering that this product can often be purchased on-line for around $50, this is quite impressive.
 
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