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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
EDIT POST NUMBER 3, NOT THIS POST!
EDIT POST NUMBER 3, NOT THIS POST!
EDIT POST NUMBER 3, NOT THIS POST!

Configuration/Specifications
  • Design: 2-Way rear-ported bass-reflex with two mid/bass drivers and one dome tweeter.
  • Frequency Response: 40 Hz – 23 kHz (± 3 dB)
  • IEC Power Handling: > 200 W
  • Sensitivity: 86 dB (2.83 V/1 m)
  • Impedance: 4 Ohms
  • Woofer Size: 6.7”
  • Tweeter Size: 1.1”
  • Crossover: 1800 Hz
  • Dimensions: 37.9” H x 8.1” W x 10.7” D
  • Weight (Each): ~40 lbs. (18.0 kg)
The DM 3/7 features two 6.7 inch (17 cm) MSP (magnesium silicate polymer) mid/bass drivers equipped with large 3 inch (75 mm) diameter aluminum voice coils and rigid, low-resonance die-cast aluminum driver baskets, one tweeter featuring a specially-coated 1.1 inch (28 mm) diameter textile dome, an ultra-lightweight aluminum voice coil, ferro-fluid damping and a powerful magnet, a 1-inch (25mm) front baffle, and a rear port for bass tuning.

Link to manufacturer's web site.

Setup and Placement Flexibility

Getting the DM 3/7's placed for top performance was fairly easy, one of the easiest of the speaker models evaluated. They only took a few minutes, moving very little from the room's favorite placement spots for cone speakers, mainly needing proper toe-in adjustment. Listening position flexibility was quite relaxed, the soundstage shifted only a little with normal head movement.

Impressions

Since first hearing the Dynaudio models at the Rocky Mountain Audio Fest in Denver a few weeks ago, I had looked forward to spending more time with them during this evaluation. The high-end quality first grabbed my attention, not quite as forward as some of the models we were hearing over the weekend, very easy-going. Easy-going might be the best overall description for the way the Dynaudio's performed. Everything they did, they did well and made it seem easy, with the exception of the drivers bottoming out with deep bass - more on this later. I knew in seconds I was going to really like the DM 3/7's.

Bass response was strong, deep, and solid. It seemed much deeper than the 50 Hz limit we measured. The peak at 60 Hz probably contributed to this impression. Bass was reasonably tight, never mushy or loose.

Frequency Response, Bass Extension

The DM 3/7 frequency response profile follows a common pattern for speakers. A slight dip in response at and below 1 IHz relaxes the midrange somewhat. On either side, the bass and treble frequencies rise gradually. Highs peak in the case of the DM 3/7's at 4 KHz, falling off beyond that. The falloff results partly from the amount of off-axis angling required for a deep soundstage. Bass response rises toward the low-frequency peak at 60 Hz, and extends to a steep drop off at 50 Hz. Room modes undoubtedly contribute to that drop off being above the 40 Hz spec. The upper mids are lacking the often-heard peak at 2 KHz, a frequency range commonly emphasized for the amount of detail it tends to reveal. The DM 3/7's have slight peaks above and below that frequency, giving them a distinctive tone while still being generously detailed. I found that tonality refreshing, perhaps a contributor to the Dynaudio signature sound. The 2 KHz peak often found in other speakers is easily overdone and can be a sure fatigue-button if emphasized even slightly too much. The DM 3/7's gave no hint of fatigue tendency, were extremely easy on the ears.



Room EQ Wizard MDAT file for download: View attachment Dynaudio DM 3_7 final for download.mdat

The DM 3/7's could pump out some serious deep bass. Perhaps they over-reach a bit for the two small woofers used in the design, thus the bottoming incident already mentioned. Short of that, they seemed in tight control and gave no other indication of being close to losing that control. The amount of bass seemed just right, solid without over-emphasis. The big bass drum on The Spirit Remains felt tight and controlled.

The ringing of acoustical guitar strings through Ode to a Butterfly stood out as an example of accurate tonality. Vocals, as on "Breezin' Along with the Breeze," were warm and detailed, with a hint of sharpness but still very easy, very real and accurate. The brass section performing the Star Trek Main Theme was commanding and clear, tonally accurate.

The deep lead vocal on the marvelous These Bones track was warm and resonant while only slightly peaky. Melody Gardot's voice, singing Baby I'm a Fool, was more tightly controlled than many speakers are able to hold it, still warm and personal, not overly resonant.

Soundstage and Imaging

The soundstage projected by the DM 3/7's was first-rate, completely natural and arresting in its sense of reality, exceptionally sharp and clear. Imaging was tight - roughly baseball size - and almost completely free from smearing and wandering on odd tones and sibilants. The DM 3/7's projected a deep soundstage - for our tastes the "spark of life" of a soundstage and one of our primary setup goals - and the depth detail and acuity were of a caliber I have heard from only a handful of speakers. Throughout Ode to a Butterfly, first song on our track list, the impression of precise placement and distance to the mandolin, fiddle, guitar, and standup bass almost distracted me from the music itself. I usually listen to about one-third to one-half of that track and skip ahead. I listened to the entire track with the DM 3/7's.

Chant, with its spacious ambiance, gave us a good chance to hear how open and wide the soundstage really was. The DM 3/7's did not seem to push at the walls for more space, rather were very comfortable with using all the space available for their soundstage. The trumpet on Your Latest Trick was real enough to occupy its own space in the room.

Power Handling

The DM 3/7's performed SO well that it was a disappointment when the drivers bottomed out on the deep booms at the beginning of the Cincinnati Pops' Star Wars theme. It was not pretty. The "boom" was more of a "boom-crunch" as the bass driver - one or both, we could not tell for sure - bottomed out in its magnet/support structure. One could not help but cringe.

It was interesting to note individual reactions to this. With one of the group, a very black-and-white kind of person, you could almost see the mental check marks for good performance in other categories being erased because of the fault. Can't handle the bass? Then no check marks for YOU. Being a shades-of-gray kind of person, I noted it and continued to enjoy the DM3/7's other qualities.

Through that passage, the volume level was set to vary between 90 and 95 dB SPL (c-weighted, slow averaging), occasionally peaking at 100 dB. Yes, we were pushing them a bit, but the DM 3/7's were the only speakers we evaluated that bottomed out on that passage.

The Port of Morrow segment of our medley track accidentally got a 6 dB boost in the compilation process. It ended up being a good, rocking power-handling test, so it was left that way. The DM 3/7's had not trouble with the boosted volume, handled it easily as though to make up for the bass-handling faux pas of a few moments earlier.

Performance Close to the Front Wall:

Up on the Cedar Creek Cinema stage (Sonnie's home theater), the DM 3/7's sounded OK, but not great. The high frequencies seem veiled and the bass was quite boomy. Even with fairly quick placement there and only a little fine tuning, it was apparent that a nice soundstage and good imaging were possible, although depth of soundstage was not apparent at that location. All-in-all they performed fairly well there, although that performance fell far short of what they would do later at their optimal location closer to the listener.

Physical and Visual

They definitely have the Dynaudio look. They are not huge speakers, and will fit nicely in practically any room. The front face leans back slightly and hits the Listening Position just right from the distance we set them at. The finish is adequate. Dynaudio's laminate finishes look a little fakey to me, but fit and finish are always top-grade, so it is only a minor point, and will not matter in the least to many.

Overall Listening Experience

The surest sign that I - along with others in the group - can use as an indication of overall speaker quality in satisfying one's individual preferences comes at the end of the evaluation. It is time to surrender the listening position to the next evaluator, and you just do not want to stop. What you want to do is run grab an armfull of CDs or crrrrrrank up your music server and make up an excuse to keep on listening, like nearing the end of a great first date and thinking of more things to talk about so it can be drawn out as long as possible. My first date with the DM 3/7's was something like that.

The DM 3/7's almost completely disappeared in the soundstage on most songs, and on a few, like Joan of Arc, managed it altogether. The tang of each cymbal strike seemed so clear and truthful that it served as a clarity polygraph for the speakers.

The latter part of the session was dampened somewhat by the bottoming-out of the woofers. I found myself riding the volume control with caution to prevent it from happening again. Other than that one incident, the performance of the DM 3/7's reminded me of the title of a favorite Radiohead song: Everything In Its Right Place.

What These Speakers Are Best For

You name it. They even got some Dillinger Escape Plan very-complex-very-heavy metal loudly thrown at them at one point, in defiance of our track list. No apologies from us or from the DM 3/7's, they did not mind it one bit.

The DM 3/7's handle the delicate and the powerful equally well. If lots of deep bass at extreme volumes is a high priority, the bass-handling capacity of the two 6.7-inch woofers might be a limitation. Other than that, they got high marks from me in every category.

EDIT POST NUMBER 3, NOT THIS POST!
EDIT POST NUMBER 3, NOT THIS POST!
EDIT POST NUMBER 3, NOT THIS POST!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Configuration/Specifications
  • Design: 2-Way rear-ported bass-reflex with two mid/bass drivers and one dome tweeter
  • Frequency Response: 40 Hz – 23 kHz (± 3 dB)
  • IEC Power Handling: > 200 W
  • Sensitivity: 86 dB (2.83 V/1 m)
  • Impedance: 4 Ohms
  • Woofer Size: 6.7”
  • Tweeter Size: 1.1”
  • Crossover: 1800 Hz
  • Dimensions: 37.9” H x 8.1” W x 10.7” D
  • Weight (Each): ~40 lbs. (18.0 kg)
  • MSRP (Pair): $1,995
The Dynaudio DM 3/7 features two 6.7 inch (17 cm) MSP (magnesium silicate polymer) mid/bass drivers equipped with large 3 inch (75 mm) diameter aluminum voice coils and rigid, low-resonance die-cast aluminum driver baskets, one tweeter featuring a specially-coated 1.1 inch (28 mm) diameter textile dome, an ultra-lightweight aluminum voice coil, ferro-fluid damping and a powerful magnet, a 1-inch (25mm) front baffle, and a rear port for bass tuning.

Link to manufacturer's web site.

Setup and Placement Flexibility

Getting the DM 3/7's placed for top performance was fairly easy, one of the easiest of the speaker models evaluated. They only took a few minutes, moving very little from the room's favorite placement spots for cone speakers, mainly needing proper toe-in adjustment. Listening position flexibility was quite relaxed, the soundstage shifted only a little with normal head movement.

Impressions

Since first hearing the Dynaudio models at the Rocky Mountain Audio Fest in Denver a few weeks ago, I had looked forward to spending more time with them during this evaluation. The high-end quality first grabbed my attention, not quite as forward as some of the models we were hearing over the weekend, very easy-going. Easy-going might be the best overall description for the way the Dynaudio's performed. Everything they did, they did well and made it seem easy, with the exception of the drivers bottoming out with deep bass - more on this later. I knew in seconds I was going to really like the DM 3/7's.

Bass response was strong, deep, and solid. It seemed much deeper than the 50 Hz limit we measured. The peak at 60 Hz probably contributed to this impression. Bass was reasonably tight, never mushy or loose.

Frequency Response, Bass Extension

The DM 3/7 frequency response profile follows a common pattern for speakers. A slight dip in response at and below 1 kHz relaxes the midrange somewhat. On either side, the bass and treble frequencies rise gradually. Highs peak in the case of the DM 3/7's at 4 kHz, falling off beyond that. The falloff results partly from the amount of off-axis angling required for a deep soundstage. Bass response rises toward the low-frequency peak at 60 Hz, and extends to a steep drop off at 50 Hz. Room modes undoubtedly contribute to that drop off being above the 40 Hz spec, and cause the notches at 80 and 100 Hz, affecting all models similarly. The upper mids are lacking the often-heard peak at 2 kHz, a frequency range commonly emphasized for the amount of detail it tends to reveal. The DM 3/7's have slight peaks above and below that frequency, giving them a distinctive tone while still being generously detailed. I found that tonality refreshing, perhaps a contributor to the Dynaudio signature sound. The 2 kHz peak often found in other speakers is easily overdone and can be a sure fatigue-button if emphasized even slightly too much. The DM 3/7's gave no hint of fatigue tendency, were extremely easy on the ears, the overall treble profile being just laid back enough to produce that easy-going Dynaudio tonality without going dull.



Room EQ Wizard MDAT file for download: View attachment 44920

The DM 3/7's could pump out some serious deep bass. Perhaps they over-reach a bit for the two small woofers used in the design, thus the bottoming incident already mentioned. Short of that, they seemed in tight control and gave no other indication of being close to losing that control. The amount of bass seemed just right, solid without over-emphasis. The big bass drum on The Spirit Remains felt tight and controlled.

The ringing of acoustical guitar strings through Ode to a Butterfly stood out as an example of accurate tonality. Vocals, as on "Breezin' Along with the Breeze," were warm and detailed, with a hint of sharpness but still very easy, very real and accurate. The brass section performing the Star Trek Main Theme was commanding and clear, tonally accurate.

The deep lead vocal on the marvelous These Bones track was warm and resonant while only slightly peaky. Melody Gardot's voice, singing Baby I'm a Fool, was more tightly controlled than many speakers are able to hold it, still warm and personal, not overly resonant.

Soundstage and Imaging

The soundstage projected by the DM 3/7's was first-rate, completely natural and arresting in its sense of reality, exceptionally sharp and clear. Imaging was tight - roughly baseball size for a recorded point source - and almost completely free from smearing and wandering on odd tones and sibilants. The DM 3/7's projected a deep soundstage - for our tastes the "spark of life" of a soundstage and one of our primary setup goals - and the depth detail and acuity were of a caliber I have heard from only a handful of speakers. Throughout Ode to a Butterfly, first song on our track list, the impression of precise placement and distance to the mandolin, fiddle, guitar, and standup bass almost distracted me from the music itself. I usually listen to about one-third to one-half of that track and skip ahead. I listened to the entire track with the DM 3/7's.

Chant, with its spacious ambiance, gave us a good chance to hear how open and wide the soundstage really was. The DM 3/7's did not seem to push at the walls for more space, rather were very comfortable with using all the space available for their soundstage. The trumpet on Your Latest Trick was real enough to occupy its own space in the room.

Power Handling

The DM 3/7's performed SO well that it was a disappointment when the drivers bottomed out on the deep booms at the beginning of the Cincinnati Pops' Star Trek theme. It was not pretty. The "boom" was more of a "boom-crunch" as the bass driver - one or both, we could not tell for sure - bottomed out in its magnet/support structure. One could not help but cringe.

It was interesting to note individual reactions to this. With one of the group, a very black-and-white kind of person, you could almost see the mental check marks for good performance in other categories being erased because of the fault. Can't handle the bass? Then no check marks for YOU. Being a shades-of-gray kind of person, I noted it and continued to enjoy the DM3/7's other qualities.

Through that passage, the volume level was set to vary between 90 and 95 dB SPL (c-weighted, slow averaging), occasionally peaking at 100 dB. Yes, we were pushing them a bit, but the DM 3/7's were the only speakers we evaluated that bottomed out on that passage.

The Port of Morrow segment of our medley track accidentally got a 6 dB boost in the compilation process. It ended up being a good, rocking power-handling test, so it was left that way. The DM 3/7's had not trouble with the boosted volume, handled it easily as though to make up for the bass-handling faux pas of a few moments earlier.

Performance Close to the Front Wall:

Up on the Cedar Creek Cinema stage (Sonnie's home theater), the DM 3/7's sounded OK, but not great. The high frequencies seem veiled and the bass was quite boomy. Even with fairly quick placement there and only a little fine tuning, it was apparent that a nice soundstage and good imaging were possible, although depth of soundstage was not apparent at that location. All-in-all they performed fairly well there, although that performance fell far short of what they would do later at their optimal location closer to the listener.

Physical and Visual

They definitely have the Dynaudio look. They are not huge speakers, and will fit nicely in practically any room. The front face leans back slightly and hits the Listening Position just right from the distance we set them at. The finish is adequate. Dynaudio's laminate finishes look a little fakey to me, but fit and finish are always top-grade, so it is only a minor point, and will not matter in the least to many.

Overall Listening Experience

The surest sign that I - along with others in the group - can use as an indication of overall speaker quality in satisfying one's individual preferences comes at the end of the evaluation. It is time to surrender the listening position to the next evaluator, and you just do not want to stop. What you want to do is run grab an armful of CDs or crrrrrrank up your music server and make up an excuse to keep on listening, like nearing the end of a great first date and thinking of more things to talk about so it can be drawn out as long as possible. My first date with the DM 3/7's was something like that.

The DM 3/7's almost completely disappeared in the soundstage on most songs, and on a few, like Joan of Arc, managed it altogether. The tang of each cymbal strike seemed so clear and truthful that it served as a clarity polygraph for the speakers.

The latter part of the session was dampened somewhat by the bottoming-out of the woofers. I found myself riding the volume control with caution to prevent it from happening again. Other than that one incident, the performance of the DM 3/7's reminded me of the title of a favorite Radiohead song: Everything In Its Right Place.

What These Speakers Are Best For

You name it. They even got some Dillinger Escape Plan very-complex-very-heavy metal loudly thrown at them at one point, in defiance of our track list. No apologies from us or from the DM 3/7's, they did not mind it one bit.

The DM 3/7's handle the delicate and the powerful equally well. If lots of deep bass at extreme volumes is a high priority, the bass-handling capacity of the two 6.7-inch woofers might be a limitation. Other than that, they got high marks from me in every category.


Leonard Caillouet (lcaillo)

The DM 3/7 was physically one of the less imposing speakers in the group. Prior to listening, I had little expectation, other than by reputation the company has produced well regarded products for quite some time. The size and design did not suggest a particularly unique nor "big" sound, though the apparent quality of the build is very high. I had not heard any of their speakers in a few years and then only once. I was previously impressed but not wowed.

When we started with the speakers on the stage, the results were much as expected. The bass was a bit exaggerated, but not oppressive. The imaging was actually quite good in the midrange and highs, considering the position and early reflections off of the screen at center front. Almost immediately, however, something caught my attention in the sound. This was going to be a speaker that I wanted more of. I probably spent a bit more of my fair share of time listening in this position, even though we were trying to keep the stage position short.

Once the speakers were moved to a more optimum listening position, they ended up near the spot that most of the other speakers sounded best. They took very little time to place in the optimum location. The bass settled in and became very detailed and precise and the lower mid and down now produced a very solid and stable image. The bass goes solidly down to the specified limit, with surprising clarity and detail. For an inefficient speaker, they produce a surprisingly dynamic sound, effortless right up to their limit. That limit was extreme excursion at very low frequencies where we bottomed the woofer on the opening to the Star Trek track. A disappointment, but we were stretching the speakers intentionally. Obviously this limit is the result of the small drivers and cabinet, as well as the low sensitivity. The compromise, however, was acceptable from my perspective. I rarely listen at the levels that a certain Alabama red neck does, and my soft spot for loudspeakers is detail and a smooth silky sound. There was no shortage of either in these.

One area where I am particularly demanding is lower midrange and mid bass. Even on the stage, the detail in the mids and mid bass was quite pleasing and called for more listening. Once we placed the speakers properly, it was apparent that there was something special here. While the speakers were easy to position, getting just the right toe angle revealed a level of detail and imaging precision in the mid bass that I really loved. Lower strings on an acoustic guitar, higher notes on a string bass, or the tone of a cello were all very precise and musical. There was no thinking or listening effort needed to know just where the instruments were placed in the sound field. Top to bottom the character of the speaker was intact. Dr. John's piano on "One Way Ticket" tends to move around over several octaves, partly due to the recording and partly due to changes in speaker dynamics and tonal character across a large bandwidth (relatively speaking with respect to audio). For the first time in a while, I got a solid location on the piano and slight movement of the image as he moved up or down the keys that was more proportional to what one would hear live sitting right next to the piano.

Vocal harmonies were distinct. Ability to reveal vocal detail is superb. On "Reasons Why" there is a male and female harmony that is very hard to reproduce. On the DM 3/7 the distinct character of each came through, with the voices independently placed in the sound stage. The guitar and percussion on this track were the most detailed, yet delicate, with pinpoint precise imaging.

I have heard "Last Chance Texaco hundreds of times. It was one of my standards for auditioning speakers when I was in the audio business. Rickie Lee has a very complex voice and there is nice image detail on the very best speakers. On lesser products, it can get a little muddy and indistinct. Some speakers don't get muddy at the cost of excessive detail with overshoot or ringing. These performed superbly on this track, among the best I have heard. the subtle trembling in her voice was perfect. The edge on Donald Fagen's voice was so real it brought me back to hearing it live, yet there was none of the annoying resonance on his drone that some speakers add.

Silk and delicacy, glass-like transparency, an musicality describe these speakers. A superb combination of design and execution, in my opinion. These begged for more time listening.


Joe Alexander (ALMFamily)

For appearance, the Dynaudios have a standard box shape and appear to be shorter and thinner than many of the other brands I have seen making them more flexible from a location standpoint. The finish would work well for a home theater use as well.

When these were placed on the stage, the first thing I heard was that being on the stage really kills any depth although at that location the Dynaudios did project a wide soundstage. They did have very nice low end extension – I was getting some vibration in the chair which was pleasantly surprising. Directionality was off by having them on the stage as sitting up presented a better on axis feel. Female vocals seemed to lack a “live” feel – they sound veiled which I attribute to the lack of depth in the soundstage.

When these were moved to the floor, the instrument imaging was pinpoint - moving them down to the floor really deepened the soundstage giving that "live" feel I really enjoy and they also maintained the width they showed while on the stage. On the "Ode to a Butterfly" track, the different instruments imaged perfectly with each coming from a different location in the soundfield. That imaging was consistent through the entire listening session - instrument clarity was excellent for all instruments and instrument imaging separated really well throughout my entire listening session. Vocal and low end imaging was tight to the middle and low end was really clean. Vocal dynamics were handled well with no signs of compression until you really pushed the volume, but the vocals just don’t quite have the open, airy sound I like, although it was so close to that sound that I could own a set of these and be a happy man.

Overall, a great speaker - the Dynaudios have everything I look for in a speaker with the clarity and "live" feel to the sound. The only real issue I had with these was that they are lower sensitivity speakers, and there were points where I turned the volume up a bit and there was some compression and signs of strain, but that was at a level that I would not normally listen to music.


Sonnie Parker (Sonnie)

Okay... I am raising my hand. I am the ******* who listens to loud music, and then when speakers bottom out, I toss them. If you ever passed through Alabama back in the 80's... I was the guy who had three 18's in my vehicle and was rattling your windows... yeah, the one you were shaking your head at in either amazement (cause you know you wanted to bump like I was bumpin') or in disgust (cause you know how silly it was). I think I have mellowed out a bit since then... although I do have eight 18's in my HT room... at least they are not in my truck.

Yes, I was about ready to ditch the Dynaudios because they bottom out, and NOT while I was in the listening position, thank you. However, they only bottomed on that one song, and I believe it was only the left speaker. These were a demo or review pair, so we cannot discount the possibility that they had been damaged. Nonetheless, on all the other music I listened to, including other songs with low bass, they did very well.

There is no doubt these have a big sound, despite their small size. I did think the bass near the front wall was a bit heavy, but still good, and I could live with these in that location for HT, but would have to pull them out for music, as I would any of the speakers in this event or the previous event. Overall, when placed in their best location for my room, they produced a very nice soundstage and near pinpoint imaging. They are definitely a speaker to like... however, I think I would be trying to figure out a way to move up to the Excite model, even though their price tag is considerably more.
 

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Excellent Wayne... most excellent! :hail:

Leonardo and Joseph... please put your name above your comments. I will move each of your write-ups over into each post accordingly and place them under your name there.
 

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Joe's Impressions

For appearance, the Dynaudios have a standard box shape and appear to be shorter and thinner than many of the other brands I have seen making them more flexible from a location standpoint. The finish would work well for a home theater use as well.

When these were placed on the stage, the first thing I heard was that being on the stage really kills any depth although at that location the Dynaudios did project a wide soundstage. They did have very nice low end extension – I was getting some vibration in the chair which was pleasantly surprising. Directionality was off by having them on the stage as sitting up presented a better on axis feel. Female vocals seemed to lack a “live” feel – they sound veiled which I attribute to the lack of depth in the soundstage.

When these were moved to the floor, the instrument imaging was pinpoint - moving them down to the floor really deepened the soundstage giving that "live" feel I really enjoy and they also maintained the width they showed while on the stage. On the "Ode to a Butterfly" track, the different instruments imaged perfectly with each coming from a different location in the soundfield. That imaging was consistent through the entire listening session - instrument clarity was excellent for all instruments and instrument imaging separated really well throughout my entire listening session. Vocal and low end imaging was tight to the middle and low end was really clean. Vocal dynamics were handled well with no signs of compression until you really pushed the volume, but the vocals just don’t quite have the open, airy sound I like although it was so close to that sound that I could own a set of these and be a happy man.

Overall, a great speaker - the Dynaudios have everything I look for in a speaker with the clarity and "live" feel to the sound. The only real issue I had with these was that they are lower sensitivity speakers, and there were points where I turned the volume up a bit and there was some compression and signs of strain, but that was at a level that I would not normally listen to music.
 

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I guess we are waiting on mine and Leonard's observations. Mine will be pretty short, as it was my intentions to leave most of it you guys.
 

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Leonard's Impressions

The DM 3/7 was physically one of the less imposing speakers in the group. Prior to listening, I had little expectation, other than by reputation the company has produced well regarded products for quite some time. The size and design did not suggest a particularly unique nor "big" sound, though the apparent quality of the build is very high. I had not heard any of their speakers in a few years and then only once. I was previously impressed but not wowed.

When we started with the speakers on the stage, the results were much as expected. The bass was a bit exaggerated, but not oppressive. The imaging was actually quite good in the midrange and highs, considering the position and early reflections off of the screen at center front. Almost immediately, however, something caught my attention in the sound. This was going to be a speaker that I wanted more of. I probably spent a bit more of my fair share of time listening in this position, even though we were trying to keep the stage position short.

Once the speakers were moved to a more optimum listening position, they ended up near the spot that most of the other speakers sounded best. They took very little time to place in the optimum location. The bass settled in and became very detailed and precise and the lower mid and down now produced a very solid and stable image. The bass goes solidly down to the specified limit, with surprising clarity and detail. For an inefficient speaker, they produce a surprisingly dynamic sound, effortless right up to their limit. That limit was extreme excursion at very low frequencies where we bottomed the woofer on the opening to the Star Trek track. A disappointment, but we were stretching the speakers intentionally. Obviously this limit is the result of the small drivers and cabinet, as well as the low sensitivity. The compromise, however, was acceptable from my perspective. I rarely listen at the levels that a certain Alabama red neck does, and my soft spot for loudspeakers is detail and a smooth silky sound. There was no shortage of either in these.

One area where I am particularly demanding is lower midrange and mid bass. Even on the stage, the detail in the mids and mid bass was quite pleasing and called for more listening. Once we placed the speakers properly, it was apparent that there was something special here. While the speakers were easy to position, getting just the right toe angle revealed a level of detail and imaging precision in the mid bass that I really loved. Lower strings on an acoustic guitar, higher notes on a string bass, or the tone of a cello were all very precise and musical. There was no thinking or listening effort needed to know just where the instruments were placed in the sound field. Top to bottom the character of the speaker was intact. Dr. John's piano on "One Way Ticket" tends to move around over several octaves, partly due to the recording and partly due to changes in speaker dynamics and tonal character across a large bandwidth (relatively speaking with respect to audio). For the first time in a while, I got a solid location on the piano and slight movement of the image as he moved up or down the keys that was more proportional to what one would hear live sitting right next to the piano.

Vocal harmonies were distinct. Ability to reveal vocal detail is superb. On "Reasons Why" there is a male and female harmony that is very hard to reproduce. On the DM 3/7 the distinct character of each came through, with the voices independently placed in the sound stage. The guitar and percussion on this track were the most detailed, yet delicate, with pinpoint precise imaging.

I have heard "Last Chance Texaco hundreds of times. It was one of my standards for auditioning speakers when I was in the audio business. Rickie Lee has a very complex voice and there is nice image detail on the very best speakers. On lesser products, it can get a little muddy and indistinct. Some speakers don't get muddy at the cost of excessive detail with overshoot or ringing. These performed superbly on this track, among the best I have heard. the subtle trembling in her voice was perfect. The edge on Donald Fagen's voice was so real it brought me back to hearing it live, yet there was none of the annoying resonance on his drone that some speakers add.

Silk and delicacy, glass-like transparency, an musicality describe these speakers. A superb combination of design and execution, in my opinion. These begged for more time listening.
 
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