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Hi, I am putting my own acoustic stuffing material in a pair of non-DIY monitors (Behringer B2020P), but I don't know exactly how to place go about placing it and how much to use. Any advice?
 

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If its a ported box its best to line the cabinet walls only,if its a sealed box then loosely stuffing the volume with polyester batting is fine.
 

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Forgive the noob question. But what is the best stuffing. I have an old memory foam 2" egg crate topper that I imagine (there I go again) would be decent lining for a speaker cabinet. Any thoughts?

-Kyle
 

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Acoustic wadding is a very fine point. I've carried out tests and they all seemed to produce different types of sound quality. The white polyester wadding was the worse.

The best foam I’ve used is glass fibre foam. It is extremely effective.

Polyester/polyurethane foam blocks were only ok.

Long hair wool filling is probably second best to glass fibre foam.

The above were for Bass reflex and IB.

However, I would imagine in a transmission line, the foam block and long hair wool fillings would be best.

Subwoofers are definitely better with glass fibre filling.

These are my personal findings; however others may beg to differ?
 

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Intent determines what damping material is best. If one wants to remove internal reflections to minimize resonance than a high density material such as OC705 or 8lb mineral board is ideal. Sufficient use of such materials will eliminate any internal reflections caused by driver backwaves and/or modal behavior within a cabinet. This is application dependant - a typical sealed subwoofer may only need 2-4" on each side while a midrange cabinet would need to be stuff full to prevent any reflections.

Egg crate foam and poly fill have virtually no absorption ability and are not typically suited for such an application.
 

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Egg crate foam and poly fill have virtually no absorption ability and are not typically suited for such an application.
The Professionals disagree
How does damping work?

In a sealed enclosure the driver moves in and out some distance. Multiplying the displacement distance by the surface area allows us to determine the volume of air pushed. While the front side of the woofer pushes air molecules which fill our listening areas with sound, the air in a sealed enclosure is compressed and expanded with the inward and outward motion of the driver. To more simply describe the situation in the box, we see that the quantity of air molecules in the box is fixed (it's sealed), while the motion of the driver's cone changes the volume of the sealed box.

Going back to the ideal gas laws, when you compress a volume of air, the temperature will increase. Similarly, when you increase the enclosure volume of a sealed enclosure, the temperature will reduce.

We generally stuff low frequency enclosures with insulating materials, most commonly fiberglass. The idea is that the fibers or other material helps to absorb some percent of the heat generated by the compression of the air in the enclosure. This heat is then released during the expansion half of the cycle. This is known as isothermal operation (temperature stays the same). As stated earlier, all heat is not absorbed, but the degree to which this occurs is referred to as isothermal operation.

With some percentage of heat absorbed the trapped air does not change in pressure as much as an unstuffed volume. In fact, it behaves like a slightly larger volume. In theory, this phenomenon could provide an apparent increase in volume of ~40%. As noted by Vance Dickason in the Loudspeaker Design Cookbook, practical limits with real materials tend to max out at about a 20% apparent gain (going from memory here-number may be slightly diff). With a sealed system this results in a lower Fb and lower Qb.

When stuffing is placed in a sealed box there is also resistive damping to varying degrees depending on the material. In a very old message to the DIY Bass List by NHT founder/designer Ken Kantor he noted his observations that in a real box it is common to see roughly equal parts resistive damping and isothermal operation. (check the bottom of this page for an archive of one of these posts)

The following is an E-Mail addressed to the bass list on stuffing an enclosure. Ken Kantor is the former CEO & co-founder of NHT.

From: Ken Kantor
Date: 04 Apr 95 03:41:37 EDT
Subject: Stuffing Stuff

"In light of recent discussions, let me share some thoughts regarding cabinet stuffing. I'll do this from a practical point of view, partly because the physics side has been well articulated by Doug. The other reason I'll stay away from theory in that, in the matter of cabinet fill, theory has proven over the years to be of only limited help in real-world speaker design. I'll also confine most of my comments to issues related to sealed systems. Vented systems do share a
few of these same issues, but really the goals and the physics of stuffing a vented box are different.

Most professional designers would agree that practical experience, combined with trial and error, is best way to find the optimum stuffing material, quantity and method for a given design.
This is why good designers routinely experiment with fill in the development of a new system, ala Vance's data cited here. This particular information is a valid data point, but it is important
not to over-generalize. If you are designing a system that differs substantially in shape or volume or source impedance (passive crossover) from a known you will need to iterate for best
performance.

In my practice, adjusting the filling is the last step in getting the bass right, and is used mostly to fine-tune the system Qtc and resonance. As increasing amounts of polyester are added to a
sealed box, the resonance and Q gradually go down. This can be shown mathematically to be due in roughly equal parts to the effects of simple resistive damping and isothermal conversion. At some point, a minimum is reached, and further material simply reverses the trend by taking up volume. During the filling process the impedance curve is constantly monitored, and
convergence to optimum usually takes only a short time. Filling also has the important effect of reducing internal reflections, to reduce standing waves and comb filtering. However, the amount of filling has comparatively little effect on its efficacy in this regard.

[Side Note- it is a common misconception, I believe, that professional designers rely heavily on LEAP and SPICE and CALSOD to define their designs a priori. On the contrary, professional designers use these modeling tools mostly to guide and optimize revisions. Unlike DIY designs, a typical commercial 2-way will go through perhaps 3 revs of each driver, 2 to 4 box trials, and easily a dozen+ crossover changes.]

Lining the walls of a vented enclosure to reduce internal reflections, or filling a transmission line to absorb the back wave, highly absorptive wool or fiberglass are ideal. However, these materials will not generally provide the desired results in a sealed system. It is true that they will provide more reflection absorption than polyester, but the later is quite good in this regard in the critical midrange. In a sealed system you don't want absorption at lower frequencies anyway; you want damping and isothermal conversion. I have tried "all-out" efforts using fiberglass lining and
polyester fill to achieve the best of both worlds. I found the results to offer little practical benefit over polyester alone, but its worth looking into.

All NHT systems now use polyester fill, of one variety or another. We used to use fiberglass in our vented designs, but found a Danish polyester that mimicked the properties of
fiberglass very closely. I don't know if this kind of polyester is available to hobbyists. Excluding this special poly, there are essentially two kinds of fiber available: pillow stuffing,
and audio-spec polyester. The later type allegedly has hollow core fibers, but I have been unable to verify this with my keen eyesight! Sorry, but forget the pillow type. Sure, it's easy
to get. If you use enough, it will damp the midrange, and that's better than an empty box (by a lot). But it will have little effect on the lower frequencies.

Well, that's pretty much all I know about stuffing speakers."

_________________________________________

In another message Ken Kantor added (excerpted):
"Exact enclosure volume is not critical, and stuffing can be added or subtracted to fine tune the response. I recommend adjusting the stuffing by monitoring the impedance versus frequency of the sealed box system. Add stuffing to lower the frequency where the impedance is highest. When that impedance peak starts to rise in frequency, you have added too much. The NHT/SW3p uses 820g of acoustic polyester stuffing with the 1259, but your enclosure may do better with slightly different amount."
Tom Nousaine says.....
http://web.archive.org/web/20041027051204/http://www.integracaraudio.com/caraudio/resources/fiberfill/

Aloha,
WB
 

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The experts quoted here seem to primarily be focused on effective volume not acoustic signal absorption which is what I am referring too. These are two completely separate issues.

Of course, there are some potential negative effects from use of materials as I discuss alluded to within the quotes. The main potential issue is critical damping of a sealed midrange enclosures. Critical damping will cause an attenuation of lower frequency response, but critical damping can be fully remedied via equalization or crossover design.

In the end for acoustic signal absorption, which results in cabinet resonances, there is no superior alternative and materials such as egg crate foam and polyfill are virtually useless.
 

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The experts quoted here seem to primarily be focused on effective volume not acoustic signal absorption which is what I refer.
The effective volume increase is a function of the absorption of the acoustic signal.

Proper use of materials I recommended will typically result in critical damping of midrange enclosures,
Critical damping of an enclosure can be accomplished using any number of damping materials. And the effects of the damping material can be measured by comparative impedance sweeps.

In the end for acoustic signal absorption, which results in cabinet resonances, there is no superior alternative and materials such as egg crate foam and polyfill are virtually useless.
And the proof for this claim is in what peer reviewed research?
 

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The effective volume increase is a function of the absorption of the acoustic signal.
The effective cabinet increase is not due to absorption, but changed internal thermal characteristics of the cabinet.

Critical damping of an enclosure can be accomplished using any number of damping materials. And the effects of the damping material can be measured by comparative impedance sweeps.
A material must have sufficient absorption characteristics for a given cabinet size to cause critical damping.

And the proof for this claim is in what peer reviewed research?
Measured absorption coefficients by credible sources such as NRC labs.
 
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