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Hello -

I inherited a Bose Acoustimass 10 Series III system that has 5 surround sound double cube swivel speakers, and a subwoofer. I am trying to understand the best way to connect this Bose subwoofer to the receiver I just purchases used, a Yamaha RX-V471. The input connector type on the subwoofer is a 15 pin (8 over 7 under) male d-sub, and the output for the subwoofer on the receiver is a single female RCA type connection.

Ideally, I need a cable with a 15 pin female d-sub connector on one end and a single male RCA subwoofer connector on the other. I can find such a cable on ebay, but they are much more expensive than I was anticipating, $50-$100, i.e. search "BOSE ACOUSTIMASS 6/10/15 SUBWOOFER TO RECEIVER SPEAKER CABLES" on ebay for an example.

Is there a more economical way to set this up by using several cheaper adapters/cables, without compromising the sound quality, i.e. something like a 15 pin d-sub to vga adapter and a vga to RCA cable?

I'm not too savvy in this area - please let me know if anyone has a good, cheaper solution.

Thanks very much.
 

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The Bose Acoustimass 10 Series III connection cable is proprietary, you would need to know the designation of the individual pins to be able to create your own cable.

The pinout shown here is for the Bose Acoustimass 10, I have no way of knowing if the Bose Acoustimass 10 Series III is the same.

6AC4306.jpg
 

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....Ideally, I need a cable with a 15 pin female d-sub connector on one end and a single male RCA subwoofer connector on the other.
NO, that cable arrangement would not work, it would only carry the LFE (sub signal).
The Bose proprietary cable carries all of the surround sound (LFE + mains + surround signals). The connection cable end that plugs into the AVR would need 1 RCA cable connetor (for the AVRs LFE terminal) + several sets of standard speaker wires (for the AVRs main/surround speaker terminals).

If you have some skills, you can easily use a standard RCA cable + some standard speaker wire that would connect to the AVR. Then strip off the ends of all wires that would go into the Bose connection and insert the bare ends into the proper holes.
or
You could use a standard D-sub connector/cable that would plug into the Bose. Then strip the other ends to bare wire. The standard speaker terminals would use the bare wires, but the LFE connection would necessitate soldering on an RCA connector.
 

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If you have some skills, you can easily use a standard RCA cable + some standard speaker wire that would connect to the AVR. Then strip off the ends of all wires that would go into the Bose connection and insert the bare ends into the proper holes.
Thanks for the quick reply. It is probably obvious that I have no experience with this, apologies.

I think I understand your reply for the most part. I have two questions:

1. In order to "insert the bare ends into the proper holes" on the subwoofer, how do I do that since the connection type is male? Just get a female adapter? And if so how do I get the wires to stay in?
2. What size/guage wire will I need to use for the main and surround connections (should the same type of wire used for the other speakers fit into the d-sub connection?... seems like they might not fit, but I don't know)?

Thanks again for the input and baring with my incompetence.
 

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1. A female connector would be great. Soldering the bare wires into the holes would be best. For temp testing, the bare wire can be doubled up and stuffed into the holes.
2. Size of speaker wire has mostly to do with the distance that the wire needs to run. The longer the wire, the bigger it needs to be. 16 gauge is probably the most universal.

If this equipent is something special to you, you may not want to try any of this DIY. If you don't care if any of this equipment breaks (catches on fire), then this could be a fun DIY experience. You really need to be certain of what goes where.... positives, negatives, grounds, pins, tips, shields....
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You could use a standard D-sub connector/cable that would plug into the Bose. Then strip the other ends to bare wire.
I went to a couple electronic stores today to get a standard d-sub connector/cable to give this a try, but got a lot of funny looks trying to find a d-sub 15 pin 8 over 7 under setup that would work for speakers. I am having trouble finding anything online now either. Is this something I should be able to find? Could you post a link of an example if so?

Thanks!
 

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Sounds like the experienced consensus is to buy one already made. My only concern about the one linked in on ebay is whether the wiring is of proper quality. I have little experience, but doesn't the wire on that product look thinner than normal speaker wire?
 

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It may not be a terrible idea to call Bose and ask what one of the cables cost to get it from there.
Definitely not a terrible idea. I just called them and they were very helpful. A new cable would have cost $75, but they actually have an adapter cable with the d-sub connection on one end and box with 6 regular speaker wiring ends on the other, so I can just use regular wiring from that to the AVR. Cost less than $20 after shipping and taxes.

Thanks for the good suggestion, and thanks to everyone for the input!
 

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Have you listened to this sub somewhere? Is it a sub that you don't mind putting this much effort into? I suspect you can get a similar sub for the cost of the cable is they are that expensive. My advice is to get a regular sub with RCA connectors.
 

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He got the whole system for free sans the cable he is asking about.
The Bose is a speaker system, it won't work correctly if you substitute "regular" speakers or sub.
 

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He got the whole system for free sans the cable he is asking about. The Bose is a speaker system, it won't work correctly if you substitute "regular" speakers or sub.
The AM system used a fixed crossover. Putting a new sub in and powering the cubes off the avr would work. Just be sure to run the room correction on the avr and you'll be fine.
 
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