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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys,
I did a bunch of Eqing in 3 media rooms yesterday as well as some distributed audio Eqing. I noticed that everytime I ran a sweep i saw about a 3-6db drop around 1.5-4Khz on the graph. Has anyone else experienced this using an analog RS meter?

L

 

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Hey Guys,
I did a bunch of Eqing in 3 media rooms yesterday as well as some distributed audio Eqing. I noticed that everytime I ran a sweep i saw about a 3-6db drop around 1.5-4Khz on the graph. Has anyone else experienced this using an analog RS meter?

L

Try doing an outdoor ground plane measurement.
 

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Just remember that anything above 2K is not going to be accurate as the RS meter is very poor above that.
 

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My understanding is the Digital RS meter is a little better (around 4k)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
yeah i delt with the 100-200hz range the best i could. the hp filter is set to 80z on those. I guess im gonna need a measurement mic one of these days. any recomendations on real full range measurement mics that arent made by behringer? lol.
 

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If your not intrested in Behringer then The Galaxy CM 140 is a much better meter and is good to about 10k and still not bad above that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I wish I knew this before I bought my RS meter only about 60.00 more then the RS meters. funny why everybody wouldnt go with this then.
 

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For some that $60 is why they dont. Give them a cheaper option and they go for it.
To really do full range readings correctly you really need the ECM8000
 

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Hey Guys,
I did a bunch of Eqing in 3 media rooms yesterday as well as some distributed audio Eqing. I noticed that everytime I ran a sweep i saw about a 3-6db drop around 1.5-4Khz on the graph. Has anyone else experienced this using an analog RS meter?
I assume the three different rooms all had different speakers, or at least they didn't all have the same speakers? Anytime readings from different speakers all looking the same, you can assume that what you're seeing is the response of the measurement mic, not the speakers.

Regards,
Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
yes, i failed to mention that. all rooms had different speakers and very different room geometry. i still noticed the same drops and peaks in the same range (around 200Hz and 2kHz). I am working for a company that does the odd high-end home theatre so I could see us wanting to have a very accurate meter or mic very soon down the road. I was looking at the earthworks microphones. If one has a bigger budget to get out of the $100 microphone range and get a calibrated mic, what do you guys recomend I get? I am from the recording industry and dont have alot a big vocab of measurement equipment.

thanks
 

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If one has a bigger budget to get out of the $100 microphone range and get a calibrated mic, what do you guys recomend I get?
Well, if you're going to be using REW as your measurement platform, then the ECM8000 is as good as anything. You can get them custom calibrated for ~$100 from our recommend vendor, Cross Spectrum. The nice thing about mic calibration is that it gets you accuracy without spending a fortune for a high-end mic. But I'm sure Herb will accept any amount you want to pay, if it makes you feel better. :D

Regards,
Wayne

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
haha yeah i guess im just from the recording world where everything should be as perfect as it can get before any software adjustments are made but if it works very accurately and is cheap thats even better!
 

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To drive the point home (perhaps needlessly so), before the advent of software like REW and TruRTA, stand-alone hardware RTAs from companies like AudioControl, Goldline and Klark Teknik were the standard. It would be silly to think these units came with super-accurate mics that cost thousands of dollars. No, they came with relatively inexpensive mics, and the mic calibration was built into the hardware itself.

So – as far as I know, expensive mics have never been needed for obtaining in-room frequency response.

Regards,
Wayne
 
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