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Discussion Starter #1
After lining the wall behind my screen with 703 and putting my grill-cloth proscenium wall sections in place, I can see the yellow through the grilles in various places under certain lighting conditions. Some searches have revealed a number of solutions to the issue, from covering in felt (which I would think would effect the performance to some degree) to covering in another layer of grille cloth (more costly). I did not find any threads that broached the subject of the quickest/cheapest option - black spray paint. I tested a small area of one 703 panel and it doesn't appear to change the texture in any appreciable way, which leads me to believe it will not affect the sound, but before I ruin $150 worth of panels to save $50 in grille cloth I thought I'd post here and see if anyone had any reasons this might be a bad idea. Any replies appreciated.
Thanks!
Stan
 

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Painting 703 will change the HF adsorption so if you are using it only for the low end, it shouldn't be a problem but if you're using it for first reflection points, it's not recommended.

Bob
 

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What about using cheap fabric??? ... I know speaker fabric is $10/yd, I remember reading that you can use muslim that cost less than $3/yd :yes:
 

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Pretty much any fabric with a loose weave such that you can blow through it, will work. The normal practice is to cover the 703 with white cotton batten first so the yellow color doesn't show through.

Bob
 

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Black muslin is very inexpensive and will do basically nothing to change the performance of the 703

Bryan
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Mounting 703 to wall, gap or no gap?

Thanks for the replies! No paint, got my cloth in a box and ready to go, but today I've stumbled on two different installations where people have left a 1" or 2" gap between the insulation and the wall. Though space is tight, I have room to do this if necessary, but I haven't seen an explanation of *why* this was done. Can anyone shed any light on this?

I was going to run 3 ferring strips from ceiling to floor and sandwich the OC between them and the wall, but I can bolt the panels to the FRONT of the strips (which would have the added advantage of removing from the equation the small amount of reflected area presented by the wood itself, as well as saving me time needed to paint it) leaving a 2" gap between the strips and the wall. Would this be preferable?

Thanks again for the help!
 

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Spacing insulation off the wall with firring will help by extending the depth of frequencies that it can absorb.

Bryan
 
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