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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I'm not sure if pre-packaged mics are "calibrated" for the auto-EQ software they're used with. Ultimately, I'd like to set up my system using REW with a calibrated mic, but am still too early on the REW learning curve.

Running EMO-Q on my Emotiva UMC-1 yields acceptable results. But that's it, just acceptable. A lot tweaking and adjusting ensues. My perfectionist side wonders if a better mic would make a significant difference. Can I expect better results substituting a high quality mic/preamp combo in place of the pre-packaged puck? Is it possible to hook up a mic/preamp combo to the traditional AVR's mic input without blowing anything up?

I'm thinking that the pre-packaged mics do NOT require phantom power. If that's the case, I could connect my Dayton EMM-6 mic to the Emotiva's mic input through a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 audio interface, which supplies the required phantom power. Of course, I'd also need an appropriate adapter cable to get from the Scarlett's 1/4" TRS output to the Emotiva's 1/8" input).
 

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Hello all,

I'm not sure if pre-packaged mics are "calibrated" for the auto-EQ software they're used with.
They are. Not to have them at least generally calibrated would be self-defeating.
Ultimately, I'd like to set up my system using REW with a calibrated mic, but am still too early on the REW learning curve.
You and just about everybody...
Of course, the mic and REW will get you information only, to do anything with it will take some form of equalizer you can adjust. REW is not an equalizer, its a measurement system only.
Running EMO-Q on my Emotiva UMC-1 yields acceptable results. But that's it, just acceptable. A lot tweaking and adjusting ensues.
Likely you're up against the limited capabilities of their auto-eq system itself.
My perfectionist side wonders if a better mic would make a significant difference. Can I expect better results substituting a high quality mic/preamp combo in place of the pre-packaged puck? Is it possible to hook up a mic/preamp combo to the traditional AVR's mic input without blowing anything up?
Can't speak to the Emotiva, but you certainly cannot do that with a Denon or Onkyo AVR. The included mic is calibrated to the system, and is what works. The only option for a better mic is with the Audyssey Pro kit, which only some better AVRs can work with (not the newest Onkyos...dumb, and off topic). The kit comes with the mic, software including a calibration file for the mic, and a preamp made for the purpose. It doesn't connect to the AVR via the same connector the basic included mic does, and the software offers greater detail and flexibility. I know that's not what you have, just saying...
I'm thinking that the pre-packaged mics do NOT require phantom power.
Yes, they all do, but not in the way you know phantom power from the typical mic and preamp. The included mics are not compatible with the typical mic preamps.
If that's the case, I could connect my Dayton EMM-6 mic to the Emotiva's mic input through a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 audio interface, which supplies the required phantom power. Of course, I'd also need an appropriate adapter cable to get from the Scarlett's 1/4" TRS output to the Emotiva's 1/8" input).
Highly doubt that will work at all, for many reason, including with the Scarlett, you're already at the wrong level for the system's input...

And with phantom power coming back into your Scarlet's output, things may become smoke-emitting.

Your best bet to achieve better results is either a better auto-eq system (Audyssey XT32 with SubEQ HT comes to mind), or hand-tweak things with an outboard parametric EQ, REW and a real measurement mic and preamp...but there's that learning curve again.

You could also...dare I say it...hire a professional...(gasp!) who has the gear and has already climbed the learning curve. They're worth the money, it's just that people think of home theater as a DIY hobby, and so ignore the higher value of a professional audio calibration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the general connectivity info and suggestions for alternatives. Also, a big thank you for explaining phantom power and saving me from potentially frying my processor!

You and just about everybody...
Of course, the mic and REW will get you information only, to do anything with it will take some form of equalizer you can adjust. REW is not an equalizer, its a measurement system only.
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< snip >
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You could also...dare I say it...hire a professional...(gasp!) who has the gear and has already climbed the learning curve. They're worth the money, it's just that people think of home theater as a DIY hobby, and so ignore the higher value of a professional audio calibration.
Well said. Results using the REW tool are only as good as the user's expertise. Graph interpretation is but one example. I agree the cost of a professional HT consultant/acoustician should be treated as an investment. At the very least, services rendered should fall in the same category as the addition of a new component (especially room treatment products).

I aspire to become one of those professionals. Stay tuned :R

Your best bet to achieve better results is either a better auto-eq system (Audyssey XT32 with SubEQ HT comes to mind), or hand-tweak things with an outboard parametric EQ, REW and a real measurement mic and preamp...but there's that learning curve again.
Yeah, once again, you get what you pay for. In this case, the best way to optimal results is not through shortcuts. Distractions prevent me from putting in the required effort at the moment; so I'll settle for manual setup using an SPL meter, test tones, and whatever control I can wrestle from the Emotiva's graphic EQ and bass management.

But wait, I think there's still an easy way out! For roughly $300 I could try one of those new fancy thing-a-mah-jigs known as a miniDSP DIRAC for HT. Hmmmmm. They may even have a trial software download. :ponder:
 
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