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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I know Harmony Remotes have a help button if something goes wrong.

But someone told be URC Remotes are Full Proof. This for a Condo with Renters.

So they are looking for a Full Proof Remote that does not make mistakes. I find that hard to believe right or am i wrong ?
 

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Do you mean fool proof? If so, then I would say no universal remote is completely fool proof. It does depend on which URC model you're looking at though. They have basic ones that can be programmed by the end user, and more advanced ones that require professional programming. How many devices do you need to control and what are they?
 

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Regardless of brand control options come down to the integrator's skill in programming the remote. I've seen perfect harmony programming and shoddy URC programming; same for control4 and other automation systems.

URC strikes a balance between ease of use and cost. A well programmed remote is intuitive and fast to respond. Commands are not skipped and they are executed consistently. There are a few things to take into consideration; if the equipment will be accessible to the end user or hidden away in a closet or if all equipment has discrete power and input codes.

Typically URC is a solid choice for no fuss ease of use. If you're working with an integrator you should have them show you a URC that's been programmed by them and decide if you think it is easy for someone, not familiar with your system, to operate.
 

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The post, from my understanding, isn't asking about set-up difficulty - but if the URC remotes have a 'help' button like the Harmony ONEs do in the event something doesn't turn on/go to the correct input etc. I have Harmony ONEs and love that button since sometimes you might have something obstructing one component and the code doesn't reach it - press 'help' and that usually fixes it then and there.
 

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I've reread the post and see your point.


A URC remote should be paired with an RF base station. The base station spans the gap of the room between the remote and equipment. That significantly reduces the chances of an IR misfire. If your equipment has an IR in on the back of the unit, most midrange and higher AVRs and most newer sony TVs do, you can eliminate the stick on flashers and further reduce the chance of a misfire. With proper programming we can repeatedly send necessary commands, like power state and input, to even further reduce the chance of an IR misfire. Proper programming will also take power/switching delay into account (time a device take after receiving a command till the device can receive another one) to even further eliminate the chance of a misfire.

To prevent all the delays and command repeats from overly slowing the activity jumps/macros we program variables to track device state (on/off and what the current activity is). This can help to prevent needless commands from being executed and delaying responsiveness.

Our all off (system power) button will have a macro to power all devices down and return the system variables to off (faults).

Now the need for a 'help' button is virtually eliminated and if something does fail we simply turn the system off and on again.

*HDMI-cec should always be turned off as usual.
 

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I have a URC MX-700 for 12 years, and it still works flawlessly. It controls 8 devices in my system but can do up to 20. This model is no longer made but they have remotes with similar capabilities. I just got a Harmony 650 for my bedroom set up. It was very easy to program and works as intended, howerver it isn't in the same league build quality wise. Re they foolproof? If you program it properly, and you don't abuse it, I can attest to their durability.
 

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I program many MX780's and 880's always with RF reception and emitters ... those remotes, written with proper macros are nearly flawless in operation ...

I have one client with 4 780's and 1 880... I have never, in the 2 yrs they have been in use , gone on a service related call for them - only to enhance the programming with fav channels and some new equipment additions -

I Highly recommend them - but only with qualified programming ....

I do not sell or service Logitechs anymore - they are too inconsistent....
 

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Exactly it comes down to how well the programming is written and if the installer does due diligence in trying to break the system.

A good remote is intuitive and operations are consistent.

I've seen very poorly programmed remotes that make URC seem like an overpriced universal from radio shack. I've also seen flawless imitation of CCP with smart macros that make you wonder why anyone would need more.

It really come down to the integrator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've reread the post and see your point.

A URC remote should be paired with an RF base station. The base station spans the gap of the room between the remote and equipment. That significantly reduces the chances of an IR misfire. If your equipment has an IR in on the back of the unit, most midrange and higher AVRs and most newer sony TVs do, you can eliminate the stick on flashers and further reduce the chance of a misfire. With proper programming we can repeatedly send necessary commands, like power state and input, to even further reduce the chance of an IR misfire. Proper programming will also take power/switching delay into account (time a device take after receiving a command till the device can receive another one) to even further eliminate the chance of a misfire.

To prevent all the delays and command repeats from overly slowing the activity jumps/macros we program variables to track device state (on/off and what the current activity is). This can help to prevent needless commands from being executed and delaying responsiveness.

Our all off (system power) button will have a macro to power all devices down and return the system variables to off (faults).

Now the need for a 'help' button is virtually eliminated and if something does fail we simply turn the system off and on again.

*HDMI-cec should always be turned off as usual.
Exactly the answer needed. Thanks so much.
 
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