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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello,
I am new to REW(version 5.0) and I would like to know if I can use REW for the following audio system:

1. PC(USB port) --> DAC --> PRE-AMPLIFIER --> AMPLIFIER --> LOUDSPEAKERS(left, right)
2. PC(USB port) <-- USB MICROPHONE(used only for room acoustics measurement purposes!)

Notice that the PC-FI system is equiped with neither internal PC sound card nor SPL meter.
My goal is to calibrate the audio system such that the room characteristics are compensated to my needs (i.e. listening purposes, not recording!).

Q1: Can I use the USB microphone (studio quality) for measuring SPL, or am I obliged to use a dedicated SPL meter?
Q2: Do I need an internal PC sound card to use REW or is the above audio system sufficient?
Q3: Assuming that the above system is acceptable, is the calibration/measurement/equalization process any different from what is stated in the help files?
 

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REW Author
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You can use that setup but you won't be able to do a loopback cal of the soundcard and hence won't be able to compensate for any roll-offs in the output chain or USB mic pre. Make doubly sure that you do not mix any of the mic input into the PC output, all monitoring must be off.

To calibrate REW's SPL meter without an external SPL meter just go through the process, make sure the test signal is at a comfortable measurement level and tell REW it is 75dB.
 

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Welcome to the Forum, paik!

Q1: I assume by “dedicated SPL meter” you’re talking about using it for measurements? That’s merely something we were able to come up with as a cost-effective means to measure subwoofers, which is a popular exercise for home theater users. However, it can’t deliver predictable results above about 3 kHz, so other options should be pursued if you’re interested in measuring full-range response. That said, the SPL meter is recommended for REW’s level-adjustment process that’s implemented pre-measurement.

Naturally, your results are only as good as the mic you use for measurement, and few mics deliver perfectly flat response - which is why we recommend custom calibration. “Studio quality” doesn’t necessarily mean the mic has perfectly flat response. Do you really want to equalize your system based on less-than-accurate measurements?

Regards,
Wayne

 
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