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Discussion Starter #1
I happened across the Material Safety Data Sheet for Auto Air Aluminum (#4101).

I found several things I didn't expect:

Formula: "Aqueous dispersion of organic pigment and acrylic polymer".

Hazardous Ingredients: "Not a hazardous material as outlined by the OSHA Hazard Communication standards."

Respiratory Protection: "No special respiratory equipment is recommended under normal conditions of anticipated use with adequate ventilation. If mist are generated, wear a NIOSH/MSHA approved respirator."

If I remember my basic chemistry; Aluminum and other metals are inorganic compounds. This leads me to conclude that Auto Air contains no aluminum?

I would also conclude that a standard, well fitting, non cartridge, painters particulate mask would be more than adequate protection while spraying BW?

What am I missing?

Matt
 

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If I remember my basic chemistry; Aluminum and other metals are inorganic compounds. This leads me to conclude that Auto Air contains no aluminum?



Matt
and a hearty welome to the shack from me aswell :yes:

i'm not exaclty sure why AAA is shown as an organic pigment.

i think it may relate to the aluminium flakes needing a coating of some sort to render them inert and non reactive :dontknow:
.... the coating being organic.
 

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Right, the carrier which holds the Al in suspension is a clear acrylic polymer. (organic)

But their description of the Al pigment as 'organic' is wrong.
 

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yes - the wording they have used does not seem entirely correct.

maybe they should refer to the pigment as:

1) organically coated aluminium flake

or

2) inorganic/organic hybrid compound

:scratch:
 

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Respiratory Protection: "No special respiratory equipment is recommended under normal conditions of anticipated use with adequate ventilation. If mist are generated, wear a NIOSH/MSHA approved respirator."

As far as this is concerned, if you don't spray AAA you don't need "special respiratory equipment", but if a mist is generated (spray) use a respirator, not a dust mask.

This also depends on the users outlook on safety needs as well. The body has natural defenses against air-borne particles, and I was of the opinion that since I wasn't doing this day in and day out I wouldn't need protection; you know - that whole "be a man" thing. I learned the hard way when I sprayed my Silver Fire screen without ANY breathing protection (and yes, that was incredibly stupid!) that what you can't see CAN hurt you. No damage was done to my lungs (that I know of :rolleyes:), but I spent a very unpleasant 8 hours with breathing difficulty. And that was with a MICA-based mix. Mica is non-reactive, aluminum is quite reactive.

The bottom-line is use the best breathing protection you have available to spray ANY aluminium-bearing paint if a mist is produced. Also, the more ventilation the better too.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks to all for your comments and for welcoming me to the Shack.

I have been lurking for quite a while, but this was my first post here.

I guess what still surprises me about the MSDS for AAA is that there is no mention of aluminum at all.

Given that this sheet is a government mandate (OSHA) I would have thought that the fact that it contains aluminum would be a required disclosure.

Also surprising, at least to me, is that the general impression left by the MSDS is that AAA is extremely safe and no precautions beyond those used for normal latex paint are necessary.

As I really don't want a lung full of ground aluminum I will follow Mech's and Harp's examples and use a respirator rather than a painters mask.

Your responses are timely, because I am nearing the time when I will be priming/painting (spraying) my DIY screen.

One question I would like to ask relative to the use of Kilz 2 or Kilz Premium: Are these recommended for BW because they are superior to other white primers or because they are an integral part of the final properties of the screen?

The reason I ask is that Kilz does not have a particularly stellar reputation with my screen substrate, but several of the Zinsser products do. I could start with the Zinsser and then cover that with the Kilz if that is the preferred method?

Again thanks to all for your help.

Matt
 

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One question I would like to ask relative to the use of Kilz 2 or Kilz Premium: Are these recommended for BW because they are superior to other white primers or because they are an integral part of the final properties of the screen?

The reason I ask is that Kilz does not have a particularly stellar reputation with my screen substrate, but several of the Zinsser products do. I could start with the Zinsser and then cover that with the Kilz if that is the preferred method?

Again thanks to all for your help.

Matt
Whatever primer you want to use should be fine. I guess we recommend Kilz because that's what we use. :dunno: I've seen the Zinsser before but never bought any. The only reason we prime is so that the paint adheres properly. As far as I'm concerned any primer would do. Quantum used a completely different primer for his.

I'm going to shoot Auto Air an email regarding their MSDS. It may be awhile though. I emailed them for the MSDS way back when and IIRC it took over a week for them to get back to me.
 

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The Zinsser primers are fine. I prefer the Bulls Eye® WATER-BASE to the Bulls Eye 1-2-3®; it is almost neutral in shade, covers better, and has a bit of a sheen to it.

May I ask what substrate you are using Matt?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
My substrate is clear, self leveling epoxy, poured over 2" high density extruded polystyrene that was glued to a wood frame made from poplar.

This is the statement, from an individual that has used and primed a lot of epoxy: "I used Kilz II on the interior - and did have some problems with it peeling in places that I didn't sand as thoroughly. I called the Kilz people and they were horrified that I was using it over epoxy......They did say however that their own tests indicated that it was not real good to use over epoxy."

When the folks that make Kilz use the terms horrified and epoxy in the same sentence it get's my attention!:yikes:

The Bulls Eye 1-2-3 Primer sealer (acrylic latex) by Zinsser has been tested and works well even on epoxy that is not completely cured. Since the brand of white primer apparently does not diminish or alter the characteristics of the completed screen I am going to use the Bulls Eye instead of Kilz.

Matt
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This is just a follow up to my original post concerning the Material Safety Data Sheet for Auto Air Aluminum Base.

As of early January 2009 they have indeed substantially modified this document (See attachment).

So after more than 2 1/2 years they finally have a MSDS that is accurate. This really makes me wonder if these disclosures have any value at all relative to safety.

Matt
 

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Thanks for the follow-up. :T

As for myself, I take all the OSHA stuff with a large grain of salt. Most of these precautions apply to chronic exposure which doesn't apply to most hobby use. It is good to know about them though.

Basically, common sense tells you to take adequate precautions when spraying almost any material in an enclosed space; even more so if that material contains small particulates that may go air-borne.
 
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