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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen many equalizers for cars (I'm looking mostly for sub eq'ing) but I haven't seen any that are auto like the Antimode and others in the ht scene. Are there any that can do it similar to the way the Antimode does, or are there only manual ones?

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There are auto eq's in some of the head units... such as my Pioneer 3300 has it, but it is not going to have very good resolution and probably nothing like what you are looking for in the lower end.

I am not all that familiar with the Anitmode, but can it be 12v powered?
 

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Until just a couple weeks ago I was using the ms8 by JBL. By far the best auto eq set it & forget it solution for most users. Now I have the new pioneer deh-80prs radio, also has auto eq & does an admirable job IF you take the time to install your equipment properly and set things up. Still quite a bit of tweaking to do afterwards but it gets me 80-90% of where i like it with the auto feature.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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The JBL MS-8 is one of the most popular right now. Alpine has the PXE-H660, which is quite a bit cheaper and still does auto-tuning. There are some other good choices too, like the Audison BitOne and Rockford Fosgate 3Sixty.2, and upcoming 3Sixty.3 (if it is ever released). I don't think they offer auto tuning though... maybe the 3Sixty.3?
 

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The JBL MS-8 is one of the most popular right now. Alpine has the PXE-H660, which is quite a bit cheaper and still does auto-tuning. There are some other good choices too, like the Audison BitOne and Rockford Fosgate 3Sixty.2, and upcoming 3Sixty.3 (if it is ever released). I don't think they offer auto tuning though... maybe the 3Sixty.3?
I have the .3 and there is no auto-tune. Maybe in a future update, but I wouldn't hold my breath.

I just got the PXA-H800. Going to install tomorrow.
 

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I've seen many equalizers for cars (I'm looking mostly for sub eq'ing) but I haven't seen any that are auto like the Antimode and others in the ht scene. Are there any that can do it similar to the way the Antimode does, or are there only manual ones?

Sent from my iPhone using HTShack
Like Sonnie said, I doubt any auto-EQ is going to do much on the low end. You really need to get a calibrated mic and an RTA for that.

Even then, I doubt there would be much to tune other than adjusting the levels relative to your other speakers. I have a Rockford T0 sub in a sealed box. When I went to tune it I noticed there was already a smooth transition from each frequency. I don't know how you guys tune subs, as it seems most HTS users are all about subs, but for my car I just use a bass control knob and do it by ear.

I tried making everything flat once because 1/2 the people out there think flat is the best/most accurate but it sounded horrible. I found the best sound to be a smooth transition from each freq/octave with a dip in the mids. This might be blasphemy, but tuning with an A-weighted filter and 1/3 octave pink noise made the best settings I've found yet.
 

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I've used both the Pioneer and Alpine auto tunes. I feel that the Pioneer does a better job - The alpine one is a bit finicky and doesn't lend itself to adjustment after it runs.

Another option is a ms8, which sits between your source and amps/speakers and does the processing. This plus double din nav units is what I recommend to those who want sound quality without sacrificing gimmicky head units.
 

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I tried making everything flat once because 1/2 the people out there think flat is the best/most accurate but it sounded horrible. I found the best sound to be a smooth transition from each freq/octave with a dip in the mids. This might be blasphemy, but tuning with an A-weighted filter and 1/3 octave pink noise made the best settings I've found yet.
Flat frequency response in a car might sound better if the acoustics weren't so horrible. With all that window real estate, those mid frequencies bouncing back and forth will drive you crazy. It does sound like blasphemy until you think about it, but for the environment you are working with, it ends up making quite a bit of sense to pull back on the mid frequencies.
 

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I've actually made a recent discovery. I switched from the 360.3 (31-ban PEQ) to a BitOne (GEQ). The GEQ allowed for fine adjustments without affecting neighboring bands and in minimal time. I tried flat, A-weighted, and a number of target curves. My finding were that while some sounded better than others, they didn't sound "right." Also, I captured ideal curves and upon later rechecking their accuracy found that they were off despite "identical" mic placement. This brought the epiphany that going for a super perfect curve was impossible. I tried using averaging, but the results sounded the same and the repeatability of curve was still off.

My best tune ever was a 7 band PEQ on my HU using a Radioshack A-W SPL meter. Super fine tuning (31 band PEQ) produced and artificial sound despite using more bands and EQ type.

It's the "broad strokes" in tuning that produce smooth sound. This also explains why I can accomplish much more in a car with a 2 or 3 band PEQ. Going for flat "in theory" works, but sounds like (in a car at least). I think the tuning-by-ear people are on to something. This leads to the inevitable "smiley face" tune that the flat theorists despise.

Speaker type and placement is the most important. Ultra-tuning is minutia.

Took me almost 2 years who know how many hours to figure this out.


Next step, but the 360.3 back in (better control module, software, and hardware imo), level set speakers, A-W weighted tun for mids and highs, bass by ear, DONE.
 

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I've actually made a recent discovery. I switched from the 360.3 (31-ban PEQ) to a BitOne (GEQ). The GEQ allowed for fine adjustments without affecting neighboring bands and in minimal time. I tried flat, A-weighted, and a number of target curves. My finding were that while some sounded better than others, they didn't sound "right." Also, I captured ideal curves and upon later rechecking their accuracy found that they were off despite "identical" mic placement. This brought the epiphany that going for a super perfect curve was impossible. I tried using averaging, but the results sounded the same and the repeatability of curve was still off.

My best tune ever was a 7 band PEQ on my HU using a Radioshack A-W SPL meter. Super fine tuning (31 band PEQ) produced and artificial sound despite using more bands and EQ type.

It's the "broad strokes" in tuning that produce smooth sound. This also explains why I can accomplish much more in a car with a 2 or 3 band PEQ. Going for flat "in theory" works, but sounds like (in a car at least). I think the tuning-by-ear people are on to something. This leads to the inevitable "smiley face" tune that the flat theorists despise.

Speaker type and placement is the most important. Ultra-tuning is minutia.

Took me almost 2 years who know how many hours to figure this out.


Next step, but the 360.3 back in (better control module, software, and hardware imo), level set speakers, A-W weighted tun for mids and highs, bass by ear, DONE.
Good points all. Yes, with the the "small room with many, many reflections" environment inside a car, it makes sense that most fine-tuning will have the desired effect only at one point, a sweet spot of only a couple of inches, making the system sound worse everywhere else. The broad strokes approach wins. Thanks for sharing your experience.

Now if someone could just come up with completely transparent broadband sound absorbing material that you could apply to the insides of your car windows legally, it would be a whole new ballgame.:ponder:
 

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Good points all. Yes, with the the "small room with many, many reflections" environment inside a car, it makes sense that most fine-tuning will have the desired effect only at one point, a sweet spot of only a couple of inches, making the system sound worse everywhere else. The broad strokes approach wins. Thanks for sharing your experience.

Now if someone could just come up with completely transparent broadband sound absorbing material that you could apply to the insides of your car windows legally, it would be a whole new ballgame.:ponder:
Hahahahahah :D
 
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