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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good morning

My setup currently consist of an anthem MRX300 powered by 2 X QSC RMX850 for main and center and a EP4000 for the sub connected with RCA to 1/4 cables

I was thinking with the idea of buying 3 art Cleanbox pro to convert the unbalance signal to a balance one with xlr but came across the DI4000 from Behringer

my question: Can the DI4000 be use instead the art cleanbox in the same capacity ?

Alain
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It will, but what’s the point? There’s no benefit to converting to balanced, unless your amp is a long distance from the signal source.

Regards,
Wayne
Hi Wayne

I read this on another website which got me thinking because with my MRX300 at -25db i am not noticing any difference in sound volume level with or without the QSC :

An S-Convert can solve input/output level problems for level matching consumer and professional audio equipment. For example, if you use an RCA to XLR cable from your receiver/preamp to your amplifier, you will notice a drop of a few dBs. The biggest advantage that XLR offers is grounding and less noise problems. A lot of time, when you connect an RCA device to an XLR device, the level may not be sufficient and you need to increase the output level of the source to match the input level of the destination.

This is from the Manual:

Quote:
S-convert provides a convenient solution for matching levels and interfacing audio devices, either on stage or in the studio. The S convert is a specially designed miniature level matching device that allows you to convert stereo –10dBV (RCA) signals like those from consumer CD players and cassette recorders, to +4 dBu (XLR) signals like those from professional mixers, outboard effects processors and DAT machines to name some. The S-convert works in both directions and features male and female XLR connectors for the balanced +4dBu inputs and outputs, along with RCA connectors for the unbalanced –10dBV inputs and outputs. The addition of +4 and –10 LEVEL controls allows you to use S-convert to calibrate your signals to an exact level.
 

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Hi Wayne

I read this on another website which got me thinking because with my MRX300 at -25db i am not noticing any difference in sound volume level with or without the QSC :
Don’t understand what you mean by that. Since you’re using the QSCs for the main speakers, what does “without the QSC” mean? You turned it off? Of course I’m sure that’s not it because that would definitely hear a difference in sound volume. :D


An S-Convert can solve input/output level problems for level matching consumer and professional audio equipment. For example, if you use an RCA to XLR cable from your receiver/preamp to your amplifier, you will notice a drop of a few dBs.
Okay, you’re talking about a signal booster, not just an unbalanced to balanced converter (as your first post seemed to indicate). If that’s the case this Behringer is not a good option. It doesn’t have a variable level control like the Art Cleanbox and S-Convert, only a button that boosts a huge 20 dB.


The biggest advantage that XLR offers is grounding and less noise problems.
As a blanket statement this isn’t necessarily true. Keep in mind that the S-Convert is a pro audio product, and as such was designed for professional applications and situations. For reasons I won’t go into here, in professional environments balanced signals are always preferable to unbalanced. In home audio, at least when decent equipment is involved, the background noise levels are pretty near dead silent to begin with. Converting to XLR isn’t going to get an improvement on “dead silent.” Especially using a device that isn’t even as quiet as your other equipment to begin with. Both the Art and Samson spec S/N at 90 dB, while your Anthem is 102 dB and the QSC is 100 dB. So to get a “quiet” XLR signal you’re going in with a 10 dB penalty.

Then there is the issue with signal boosting in general. Any such device doesn’t just boost the maximum output. It’s boosting the entire operating range, including the noise floor, right along with it. So the trade off with an artificial signal boost is increased background noise. If you haven't seen it already, I suggest reviewing my dissertation on gain structure, which you can find in my signature.

All that said, I really can’t see what you hope to gain with a signal booster. Anthem’s manual says its pre-amp outputs are nearly 5 Vrms, while the RMX 850 only needs 1.15 Vrms to drive it to max. So your pre-amp has easily 4 times the voltage needed to drive your amps. If anything, you could probably use a signal attenuator!

Regards,
Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you very much for your explanation Wayne.
 
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