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Hi guys,

As I understand it pro audio amplifiers do not have volume regulators but attentuators, that is, they control the amount of amplification done, as opposed to normal amps where you dampen the gain.

Wouldn't this mean, that the attentuators should be at max the whole time to get the most out of the amplifier? And just regulate the input level to the amp with something else, such as the receiver or an active crossover (or in my case, a signal converter (samson s-convert)).

Or am I wrong?

Because I'm concerned that if I have the attentuators at 12 o clock, the subs won't get getting the full power out of the EP2500 even though it's receiving a full low level signal. :help:
 

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Wouldn't this mean, that the attentuators should be at max the whole time to get the most out of the amplifier? And just regulate the input level to the amp with something else, such as the receiver or an active crossover (or in my case, a signal converter (samson s-convert)).
You're right, that's what I read on my amp manual (Samson Servo 600) ...to get all benefits of the amp, the gain/volume has to be fully opened (that's what I'm doing) :yes:
 

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Hi guys,

As I understand it pro audio amplifiers do not have volume regulators but attentuators, that is, they control the amount of amplification done, as opposed to normal amps where you dampen the gain.

Wouldn't this mean, that the attentuators should be at max the whole time to get the most out of the amplifier? And just regulate the input level to the amp with something else, such as the receiver or an active crossover (or in my case, a signal converter (samson s-convert)).

Or am I wrong?

Because I'm concerned that if I have the attentuators at 12 o clock, the subs won't get getting the full power out of the EP2500 even though it's receiving a full low level signal. :help:
Frankly, they need to be set where your system works best. They work effectively as gain controls. They do not 'limit' anything. You will get full power if the line signal is of sufficient level. But if you set the gains to full open on many pro amps, you can often end up with audible hiss, especially with mids and highs.

-Chris
 

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You should not set your gains wide open, it is not a power output control, the gain control on your amp adjust the input sensitivity to match that of the head unit. Turning the gain up does not mean more power, just more noise. The object is to match the amps input sensitivity to the output of your head unit or Avr. The easiest way without useing test equipment is to turn the master up to about 90% and then start bringing up the gain on the amp until it starts to distort, be carefull not to do this to long, and then back off the gain just a bit. That is where it should be at least it is when doing it by ear.:yes:
 
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