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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did a search here for the 160s but it showed no results. The living room is 18x12 and will have minimal light after i get the blackout curtains and or window film to block the light. It looks like at 18 feet i will have about a 115 inch screen. what would be some good options that involve little to no mixing other than at the paint store.

any help and input is greatly appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Your pj is too bright. If i were you, i 'd be looking for something like N7 (or even lower) shade of gray to paint my wall. If your room is light controlled, i can't see why not..
I do not know what N7 is but i assume they will at the paint store. With the projector being too bright should i:

turn down the brightness all the way

allow all or just some of the light through the windows

a combination of the two

Or none of those the N7 or lower paint will compensate for the pj brightness.
 

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I did a search here for the 160s but it showed no results. The living room is 18x12 and will have minimal light after i get the blackout curtains and or window film to block the light. It looks like at 18 feet i will have about a 115 inch screen. what would be some good options that involve little to no mixing other than at the paint store.

any help and input is greatly appreciated
Welcome to HTS! :wave:

I can't find any in-depth reviews of this PJ to base a screen recommendation on so I'm just going to go with the values from the projectorcentral calculator. In video/games mode with the PJ 18 feet from the screen (116" diagonal 16:9) they say you should expect to get 25 fc of image brightness; you are going to get a bit less than that when using 16:9 mode as that mode blocks pixels to achieve that image ratio; your PJ has a native aspect ratio of 4:3. Also keep in mind that as the lamp ages this value could drop by half.

This PJ is relatively low resolution at 800x600 and the contrast of 3000:1 was determined by the Full On/Off method meaning you will never see this high a ratio when watching movies or playing games.

I'm going to recommend Sherwin-Williams ProClassic interior latex Series B20 in satin finish tinted to SW-'Unique Gray' which is an N8 level of gray as the best all-around screen choice for you. This paint is designed to be rolled on, but you can also use a HVLP spray gun as well. The N8 gray will give you some help in getting better perceived image contrast and also help absorb any ambient light.

Most paint stores don't know a thing about N levels of gray. The 'Unique Gray' color mentioned above is a Sherwin-Williams color so you should have no difficulty getting it made at a Sherwin-Williams store. BTW, Sherwin-Williams is having a 30% off sale for the rest of December!
 

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I do not know what N7 is but i assume they will at the paint store. With the projector being too bright should i:

turn down the brightness all the way

allow all or just some of the light through the windows

a combination of the two

Or none of those the N7 or lower paint will compensate for the pj brightness.
Take a look on this thread:

http://www.hometheatershack.com/for...s-simple-off-shelf-solutions-3.html#post40435


For better viewing experience you should cut off all the surrounding light from any source. A N7 gray paint will block much of the extra luminosity. You can always consider buying a ND2 (~50%) or ND4 (~70%) filter in order to reduce the output light from your pj. If you opt for the latter solution, you have to go to a white or light gray screen (N9-N9,5).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This PJ is relatively low resolution at 800x600 and the contrast of 3000:1 was determined by the Full On/Off method meaning you will never see this high a ratio when watching movies or playing games.

I'm going to recommend Sherwin-Williams ProClassic interior latex Series B20 in satin finish tinted to SW-'Unique Gray' which is an N8 level of gray as the best all-around screen choice for you. This paint is designed to be rolled on, but you can also use a HVLP spray gun as well. The N8 gray will give you some help in getting better perceived image contrast and also help absorb any ambient light.

Most paint stores don't know a thing about N levels of gray. The 'Unique Gray' color mentioned above is a Sherwin-Williams color so you should have no difficulty getting it made at a Sherwin-Williams store. BTW, Sherwin-Williams is having a 30% off sale for the rest of December![/QUOTE]

The sherwin Williams sounds like a good choice. i have seen people post a few different ways to do this. Should i do primer and if so how many applications and do i sand in between applications. how many applications and should i sand the paint itself or just roll it on and leave it. now for the frame, i do not own a saw and I am not good at making proper cuts let alone the mitered or whatever the corner cuts are called. Is there an easy way to do this and it still look good?
 

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The sherwin Williams sounds like a good choice. i have seen people post a few different ways to do this. Should i do primer and if so how many applications and do i sand in between applications. how many applications and should i sand the paint itself or just roll it on and leave it.
I assume you are going to paint an area of your existing wall to use as a screen and not go with a separate panel made of another material such as MDF or Sintra. If such is the case then you should inspect your wall for dings, divots and other imperfections and fix those before painting. While the SW ProClassic Series B20 paint in a light neutral gray satin finish doesn't usually hot spot (we have only had one report of this happening) it IS a paint with some noticeable gloss to it that will tend to make surface imperfections show up much more than a flat finish paint would. If you have to fix any problems of this sort you should prime before painting. Kilz 2 is a popular primer.

If the wall is in good shape and the exiting paint has a flat finish and is either a white, or very light color, then you might get away with painting directly over it, but priming first is the safest way to go.

If you are rolling your primer/paint on then sanding the primer between coats will give the absolute smoothest finish before applying the gray finish paint, but unless you are getting a very rough texture with the primer for some reason sanding really isn't necessary. Use 1/4" or 3/16" nap roller covers (the shorter the better). If you do decide to sand the primer you should wait at least 24 hours after the paint is dry to the touch before sanding otherwise the sandpaper or sanding sponge will tend to gouge out the uncured paint rather than just removing the high points.

now for the frame, i do not own a saw and I am not good at making proper cuts let alone the mitered or whatever the corner cuts are called. Is there an easy way to do this and it still look good?
This really does come down to personal preference. If you want to get the look of a screen that is framed like a large picture then you must use some form of framing that has real thickness to it, but a number of folks have simply used a flat black adhesive-backed tape to achieve a similar look, at least from the front. There is real velvet tape, but that is quite expensive; Mech (one of the administrators here) recommended another kind of fabric tape for doing this, but I forget what it was called. If he (or someone else that remembers what this tape is called) doesn't jump in here with that info we'll have to ring his bell and shoot him a private message about it. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would do a board but i cannot find one in the size i need locally at the price i am looking for. (under 50.00)
I am attempting to sand the wall down but even with an electric sander it seems to be taking a long time. there is an excessive amount of texture on the wall. must this texture be removed or can i apply enough primer to cover it to smooth.
 

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I would do a board but i cannot find one in the size i need locally at the price i am looking for. (under 50.00)
I am attempting to sand the wall down but even with an electric sander it seems to be taking a long time. there is an excessive amount of texture on the wall. must this texture be removed or can i apply enough primer to cover it to smooth.
OK, a lot of texture is bad, and even worse if there are a number of different textures in the screen area. If the texture can't be sanded out easily it might be time to re-mud the wall (I assume it is made with drywall). My understanding is that it really isn't that difficult to do, but I have never done it myself so someone else would have to answer any mudding questions you might have.

Primer is not drywall mud or spackling compound and it will not fill in any but the smallest, shallowest texture on a wall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
OK, a lot of texture is bad, and even worse if there are a number of different textures in the screen area. If the texture can't be sanded out easily it might be time to re-mud the wall (I assume it is made with drywall). My understanding is that it really isn't that difficult to do, but I have never done it myself so someone else would have to answer any mudding questions you might have.

Primer is not drywall mud or spackling compound and it will not fill in any but the smallest, shallowest texture on a wall.
that sounds much faster and putting on mud is easy. maybe i was using the wrong sanding pad on my electric sander. within 30-45 seconds the sanding pad was smooth and seemed to just remove the paint and leave the texture behind rougher than it was before.
 

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that sounds much faster and putting on mud is easy. maybe i was using the wrong sanding pad on my electric sander. within 30-45 seconds the sanding pad was smooth and seemed to just remove the paint and leave the texture behind rougher than it was before.
It sounds like you may have worked with drywall before, that's good. It sounds like your sandpaper was clogging up. If you use regular sandpaper to sand paint or drywall with it's best to use "open coat" paper which has larger spaces between pieces of grit so it tends not to fill up with particles of the sanded item as quickly. The special sanding screens they make for sanding drywall itself are actually screens where the wire of the screen has grit bonded to it. The same reasoning applies, the drywall dust falls through the holes in the screen and doesn't get clogged between them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have tried multiple coats of mud and primer, both thin and thick and this does not seem to be working for me. It looks fine when still wet but when it dries there are little holes that pop up all over the screen area that look like a thumb tack has been pushed in thousands of times. It seems my mudding techniques are not good enough to do this right so i am considering other options.

what i am wanting to try is this www.carlofet.com/projector-screen-materials/prowhite-projector-screen-materials.html. this is not the type that has to be streched. i was wanting to use staples and or some sort of adhesive like liquid nails to hang it on the wall and use a felt tape as the border. has anybody tried this and if so what would be the best adhesive to use to hold it.
 

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I have tried multiple coats of mud and primer, both thin and thick and this does not seem to be working for me. It looks fine when still wet but when it dries there are little holes that pop up all over the screen area that look like a thumb tack has been pushed in thousands of times. It seems my mudding techniques are not good enough to do this right so i am considering other options.

what i am wanting to try is this www.carlofet.com/projector-screen-materials/prowhite-projector-screen-materials.html. this is not the type that has to be streched. i was wanting to use staples and or some sort of adhesive like liquid nails to hang it on the wall and use a felt tape as the border. has anybody tried this and if so what would be the best adhesive to use to hold it.
I would be concerned about an adhesive on the back changing the appearance of the front of the screen causing a blotched image, but this is just a guess since I haven't tried it.

You might like to read Working with Rough Walls... a Screen from Nothing for some other ideas. Wbassett had a similar problem and used liner paper to cover the screen area before painting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I would be concerned about an adhesive on the back changing the appearance of the front of the screen causing a blotched image, but this is just a guess since I haven't tried it.

You might like to read Working with Rough Walls... a Screen from Nothing for some other ideas. Wbassett had a similar problem and used liner paper to cover the screen area before painting.
thank you for the link. this will help me out a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
i took that projector back and got the epson 8350. for the most part i got the surface flat and smooth, and put several layers of killz on it. after the first layer of the sherwin williams paint i noticed the "sparkling" look did not go away after 24 hours like before. looking at the paint can i realized that i do not have latex but oil based paint. is this fixable or do i need to start all over?

This PJ is relatively low resolution at 800x600 and the contrast of 3000:1 was determined by the Full On/Off method meaning you will never see this high a ratio when watching movies or playing games.

I'm going to recommend Sherwin-Williams ProClassic interior latex Series B20 in satin finish tinted to SW-'Unique Gray' which is an N8 level of gray as the best all-around screen choice for you. This paint is designed to be rolled on, but you can also use a HVLP spray gun as well. The N8 gray will give you some help in getting better perceived image contrast and also help absorb any ambient light.

Most paint stores don't know a thing about N levels of gray. The 'Unique Gray' color mentioned above is a Sherwin-Williams color so you should have no difficulty getting it made at a Sherwin-Williams store. BTW, Sherwin-Williams is having a 30% off sale for the rest of December!
The sherwin Williams sounds like a good choice. i have seen people post a few different ways to do this. Should i do primer and if so how many applications and do i sand in between applications. how many applications and should i sand the paint itself or just roll it on and leave it. now for the frame, i do not own a saw and I am not good at making proper cuts let alone the mitered or whatever the corner cuts are called. Is there an easy way to do this and it still look good?[/QUOTE]
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
the sherwin williams matte made it look like there was glitter on the wall. when i went back to the sherwin williams store and told them this they told me never use matte for a projector. they gave me flat and after 1 application of the flat it looks much better. i can see faces and details that were not there with the matte paint.
not sure if it was something i did wrong or the wrong paint was given to me.
 

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the sherwin williams matte made it look like there was glitter on the wall. when i went back to the sherwin williams store and told them this they told me never use matte for a projector. they gave me flat and after 1 application of the flat it looks much better. i can see faces and details that were not there with the matte paint.
not sure if it was something i did wrong or the wrong paint was given to me.
Something isn't adding up here, there should be practically no difference between flat and matte finishes, and a true matte finish paint will NEVER appear to glitter. The first thing that pops into my head is that someone at Sherwin-Williams was covering up for making a mistake and selling you the wrong finish paint the first time.

Could you post the exact names and stock numbers of the paint you got in matte and then the one you got in flat?

Glad you seem to have gotten a screen to your liking. :T
 
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