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Discussion Starter #1
I hope this is the right place. Can anyone tell me the purpose of having 2 pair of 5 way binding post? What is a 5 way binding post? If I have a speaker cable that (of course has -/+) banana clip at receiver output, however when it gets to the speaker it splits off with 2+ and 2-, why? Surely the same signal is being sent to both. I am sure I have said enough or maybe I haven't, but if I keep on I will start spitting out all kinds of gibberish.
 

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Why thy call it a "5 way binding post" I'm not sure but the 2 sets of posts on the speaker is so you can "bi-amp" them, meaning that you can drive the highs and lows separately with different amps but you need proper crossovers and other equipment to do it properly and it rairly makes a noticeable difference.
Leave the jumpers in place between the posts and you will be fine, just use the top or bottom set of posts only.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Why would a cable be manufactured with one end with 1 pair and the other with 2 pair.
 

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The cable is to bi-wire the speakers. ie single end at amplifier and dual end at terminal posts on speaker.
Again the chances of hearing a difference is probably very slim.
Search the Audio forums and youl get people swearing by it and people swearing at them saying it's rubbish. :unbelievable:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The cable is to bi-wire the speakers. ie single end at amplifier and dual end at terminal posts on speaker.
Again the chances of hearing a difference is probably very slim.
Search the Audio forums and youl get people swearing by it and people swearing at them saying it's rubbish.
This then is totally different from biamping? Regardless, isn't the crossover done at the speaker not the receiver? With my Onkyo, its manual says I can bi-amp, but I would think you need 2 separate amps to accomplish this.
Is this right or wrong?The same signal is present on both pairs at the speaker end, in a biwire situation, (I assume) so what is it that would make the signal an clearer.
 

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Elite Shackster , HTS Moderator Emeritus
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Audioholics had an article where they analyzed the transfer function of regular versus biwire. Search for it there, it's a good read. Basically, the extra resistance and damping factor of the separate CAN have an impact, but when compared in magnitude to all the other factors contributing to the sound, the impact is trace at best.

As for 5 way binding posts: they are called that because you can wire them with:
1) Banana plugs
2) Spade Lugs
3) Pig tails
4) Bare wire
5) ??? got nuthin, but that's the origin of the name.
 

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Let's go one level deeper... (pardon the repetition)

2-pair of binding posts (I'm ignoring 5-way)
Presumably each pair is connected to either woofer or tweeter (in a 2-way) crossovers. This gives you two options:
- bi-wire the pair
- bi-amp the speaker

Bi-wiring is just running two conductors instead of one larger one between amp and speaker, like the cable you mention. As was stated, it has the least potential value, can be done regardless the number of binding posts, and should be considered on par with elevators that keep your wires off the floor.

Bi-amping will use a separate amplifier for low and high range drivers, but it has two variants:
- crossover before the amp
- crossover after the amp (your option with these speakers and the Onkyo receiver)

An advantage can be gained by performing the crossover function at the pre-amp stage, but the listening effect will be small. The two amp channels only carry the program desired from the drivers they drive, so there are no crossover losses. Amp power can be tailored to each driver; woofers need a lot more power than tweeters. But this is a relatively recent development...

Your Onkyo has an option that allows you to bi-amp the speakers the old fashioned way, by retaining the crossovers and attendant losses. The amp's 7 channels can be configured for a 7.1 surround, or as 5.1 with 2 free channels. These two amp channels can be a "zone B" program in another room, or they can be paired up with the existing L-R front channels. In this last case, you can use the pairs of L and R amps to bi-amp your speaker.

The only advantage is a bit more headroom as the high-range channel will have the power draw of a surround at best, and so not load down the receiver power supply. If you're not running out of power now, you'll see no advantage.

I hope this helps,
Frank
 
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