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When you "bitstream" the audio (the bits stream off the disc to the receiver with no manipulation) you will not be able to hear the menu sounds or any "secondary audio" tracks, which are used by some commentaries. With modern players, there's no audible difference between having the receiver do the decoding and having the player do it, except for the lights on the receiver.
 

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When you pay premium prices for modern audio/video equipment, the expense is no longer in the digital components: they're mostly what are called "already solved problems". You're primarily paying for other things -- like the quality of the physical construction and discrete components, the durability of the mechanical parts, the salaries of the engineers who designed it, whose logo is on the front panel, etc.

You can't really compare a receiver like the AVR4520 with a BD player, though. They have quite different design goals. A more appropriate comparison would be between the $2000 Denon DBP-A100 universal disc player and the $200 Samsung player. That Denon player most likely will last quite a lot longer than the Samsung will, but for the discs they both can play, you won't be able to hear any difference between their digital outputs. Although their component parts are physically different, the algorithms they have to use to decode the audio and video data coming off the discs are the same. Sadly, given the rapid changes in the Blu-ray player marketplace, both in the encryption algorithms required by the studios and in non-disc functionality, the Denon player is going to lose value quickly. Denon has already reduced its list price dramatically: it used to be almost $3K.

Also, don't forget that the prices of limited-run high-end components have to include a larger fraction of overhead costs than do the prices of mass-produced products, just because there are so many fewer units being produced to recover comparable expenses. That's one of the reasons, for example, that the Marantz AV8801 costs so much more than the Denon AVR-4520, even though the primary difference between them (so far as audio is concerned) is that the 4520 includes amps but the 8801 doesn't. They expect to produce many more receivers than pre/pros.
 
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