Home Theater Forum and Systems banner
21 - 26 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Here's a thread to talk about the various books and other references that are found to be informative and useful.

As a start, I'd recommed a really handy lateral-thinking guide to mixing (and recording).
"Mixing With Your Mind", Michael Stavrou, hardcover 300pp.

Stav covers a while range of topics from speaker positioning, mic positioning and 'chasing the flame' and processing during mixing (ever tried reverse-compression on a vocal track?). It makes for a great read and there will be something in there that you will probably want to try at the next recording session.

It now even has its own web site http://www.mixingwithyourmind.com/

I haven't read the book "mixing with your mind" but we used to get a magazine here in New Zealand called Audio Technology, which Michael Stavrou used to write articles for, and I have used many of these as references over the years. Excellent stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
The latest one I've read and highly recommend is: The Science of Sound Recording, By Jay Kadis.
http://www.focalpress.com/books/details/9780240821542/

This gives basic science used in the chain of sound engineering for recording.

Description

The Science of Sound Recording will provide you with more than just an introduction to sound and recording, it will allow you to dive right into some of the technical areas that often appear overwhelming to anyone without an electrical engineering or physics background.

The Science of Sound Recording helps you build a basic foundation of scientific principles, explaining how recording really works. Packed with valuable must know information, illustrations and examples of 'worked through' equations this book introduces the theory behind sound recording practices in a logical and practical way while placing an emphasis on the concepts of measurement as they relate to sound recording, physical principles of mechanics and acoustics, biophysics of hearing, introduction to electronics, analog and digital recording theory and how science determines mixing techniques.

Contents

Chapter 1: Metrology and physics

Chapter 2: Sound

Chapter 3: Hearing

Chapter 4: Electronics

Chapter 5: Microphones

Chapter 6: Amplifiers

Chapter 7: Analog recording

Chapter 8: Digital recording

Chapter 9: Mixing

Author Bio

As a Lecturer and Audio Engineer for the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Stanford University, Jay Kadis has written and performed with several bands, including Urban Renewal and Offbeats. He has built home studios, recorded and produced dozens of albums, and designed electronic devices for neurological research and sound recording.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
A book that I am now enjoying which was recently released is "The Audio Expert" by Ethan Winer. It covers a lot of subject material, and encompasses Ethan's many years working in the audio field.

The subjects covered are well-presented, but are not so complex that an engineering degree is required to understand the concepts.

I have a number of the excellent books recommended here by other members, and consider Ethan's book to be a valuable addition to my reference library.

Starliner
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Is there much available in the way of Audiobooks or Podcasts on the subjects of Live Sound and Mixing, etc.? Couldn't see much in the iTunes store.
I spend a lot of time in the car and would like to use that time more constructively!
More than happy to purchase if the material is worthwhile.
 
21 - 26 of 26 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top