Home Theater Forum and Systems banner

21 - 30 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Yeah, those look awesome. Please describe the veneering and finishing process. I'd love to try the high gloss look with similar veneer.
The veneer is the 2ply, 10 mil Santos Rosewood from Tapeease.com, ordered with a color variation. I carefully picked ou the sections of the veneer so that matched vertically on the box before cutting them out. That's how I got the stripe to line up vertically up the front, for example. This is not book matched or special order veneer. I prepared the mdf by sanding and filling as need be to make a good flat surface and then applied a coat of Zinser sanding sealer (dewaxed shellac) to seal the surface a bit. Then sanded a bit with 240grit before applying standard contact cement for an adhesive, I believe it was one coat on the veneer and two to the mdf. I used wax paper in 2-3 pieces as a separator so the veneer could be moved and shifted into place (the stripe was aligned properly and therewas a little overlap along all sides). Then I removed the wax paper at one end to stick the veneer in place and worked from that end with a J roller to apply the veneer, removing wax paper as I went. Then I trimmed the veneer back with a router and flush trim bit and sanded a little as needed for a perfect match at the corners. Then the veneer was carefully sanded with 240-400-600 grit to prepare it for further finish.

For the veneer finish, I started with a coat of tung oil, because it sealed the grain, but didn't darken is as much as other materials. After that came about 4 layers of the Zinser Sanding sealer, sanded smooth with 240-400 grit sandpaper. Santos Rosewood is an oily wood, so it is a bit of a chore to seal in the oil. After that, I applied 2-4 coats of Old Master Poly with a painting pad. To get the flat smooth finish, I applied relatively thick coats, leaving the surface sitting horizontal for a couple hours after each application so it would dry flat, with not pad marks, as if it was sprayed on. I roughed up the surface between coats with either 600grit or super fine synthetic steel wool.

For the gloss black finish, I started by sanding the mdf as smooth as I could get it, especially the edges, with 120-240 grit. Then I applied a few coats of Zinser Sanding sealer to help seal the mdf, sanding in between, followed by several coats of Rustoleum professional primer, again lightly sanding in between. After a thourough dry time, next came the gloss black enamel Rustoleum Professional coats, 4-6 total, with 2 light coats on each application, allowing the paint to dry between one set of light coats and the next set. I aso sandded enough to rough the surface in between the pairs of light coats. You have to let everything dry by 3-4 times what the manufacturer suggests between major coats, in my experience, except where they are referring to the short time window between short light recoats. Once you are beyond the initial light recoat window, usually after about an hour, you have to let the paint dry a good 4-6 days, in my expereince, otherwise you can get checking in the paint with the next coat. I generally used the super fine synthetic steel wool pads to rough the surface between these coats. In some cases, I added a Rustoleum clear enamel over the gloss black to protect it, however, I found this last clear coat tended to add some roughness to the finish that the straight gloss black did not have, so I stopped doing that. All these coats take a long time to completely dry. I can tell you that as much as 2 weeks after the last coat, I could still get impressions in the paint if I set it down on something with a texture or put too much pressure on it.

The whole finishing process probably stretched out over 6-8 weeks!

I hope this all makes sense, because I'm too lazy to proof read this all over again.

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
By the campus eh?

How many hours do you estimate that you have in those? Sorry to bombard you with questions. Great job on this finish and uniqueness. I would love to listen to them sometime.
I really can't guess how much time the whole project took, but the finish was the hardest and longest part, probably taking 6-8 weeks or so.

I live about 3 miles from campus. Let me know when you will be in town and we can try to work something out.

BTW, there are plans for a DIY meet in Lexington, KY a week from Sunday, and as of now, I plan to come and bring these. http://www.pesupport.com/cgi-bin/config.pl?read=383022

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
The PE veneer is a bit expensive, IMHO. I buy all of my veneer from Tape-Ease. They have great customer service and great prices.
Wow you're not kidding, I can get enough veneer to do both my speakers from Tape ease cheaper than I can get a 2' x 4' sheet which won't cover one speaker, from PE.

If I want to do a dark black, (where you can barely see the grain) should I use a wood like white ash, (my thoughts being it wouldnt color the outcome of the stain??) or a darker veneer?? I'm afraid if I use a brown tinted would it would discolor the pure black I want to achieve.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
I had typed up a response but it seems to have disappeared!

Anyway, for black I just use red oak veneer and then use a flat black spray lacquer that you can buy under the Ace Hardware brand name. It comes in a spray can and actually gives you a pretty good finish. I usually do 2-3 coats and it results in a bit of an egg shell finish. It's not shiny, but has just enough sheen to not look flat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Rodney,

They have a very flat frequency response and the dynamics are just awesome! These are the first "audiophile" quality speakers I've ever heard that could also make you feel like you were watching Phantom of the Opera live on stage at the Fox Theater in Atlanta. Just truly a goosebump type of experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
Although its not a speaker cabinet, I thought I'd post this finish as it can be applied to anything.

My dear loving wife wanted a wall unit/display unit, all I had on hand was a mismatch of Baltic pine, radiata pine, hoop pine, Tassie Oak and MDF. So after putting it all together I needed to find away to make it look uniform and semi-antique looking.
First thing was to find a paint that represented the lightest color of the timber grain you want to replicate. In this case it is a Wattyl color called Cane . One or two coats of this all over:
basecoat.jpg

Then comes the finish, I had 500ml of Wattyls' "choc chip" (chocolate brown)made up, I mixed this 1:1:1 with water and some additive called scumble. With this wet mix I simply brushed it on then dry brushed a wood grain like finish. The scumble slows the drying time of the paint allowing you to do larger area's and come back if something doesn't quite look right. When I was happy with the finish I let it dry and then gave it one coat of Cabbot's polyurethane (the Cabbots stuff is strong enough for floor finishes). This gave it quite a gloss and should protect it for years to come.

finishedside.jpg
finishedfront.jpg

Although for speakers you'd probably want a nice smooth finish, for funiture I found leaving dust and small lumps on the surface gave it a nice antiquey look. Each to their own though.:R
 
21 - 30 of 30 Posts
Top