Home Theater Forum and Systems banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
This set is so new I was unable to find a professional review which divulges the optimal settings. If you're unable to find one as well, then I'd suggest using a calibration disk like the ones described here.
Thanks for the response, just received the Disney W.O.W. disc. planned to calibrate the tv this weekend. Which mode setting I should use? (vivid, cinema, user, standard etc...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,261 Posts
It doesn't matter too much which mode you start with (except that you may be further away from where you'll end up). It also depends on the TV because there's no standard calibration for those modes. I would start with "user" so that you can return to the others for reference or for fun. The Disney disk holds its own against others of its type, and I think you'll be very pleased with the results. In case they don't tell you, set your lighting to be the same as that under which you view movies.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
It doesn't matter too much which mode you start with (except that you may be further away from where you'll end up). It also depends on the TV because there's no standard calibration for those modes. I would start with "user" so that you can return to the others for reference or for fun. The Disney disk holds its own against others of its type, and I think you'll be very pleased with the results. In case they don't tell you, set your lighting to be the same as that under which you view movies.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Okay I calibrated the tv with the disc, I'm having a hard time setting the backlight. Just don't know which is the correct setting and how i would know is the backlight is correct?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,261 Posts
If there's no instruction or calibration on the disc itself, check to see if anything is mentioned in the disc's user manual. If not, or if no manual, then the following advice from this setup article should work:
"For critical viewing, or watching at night, the idea is to get the best black levels, while still creating a watchable image. Once the you set contrast and brightness correctly, turn the backlight control all the way down. This will likely be too dark for most viewing. Turn it up to the point where it looks the best."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,261 Posts
One place to start is tweaktv.com.
Okay I calibrated the tv with the disc, I'm having a hard time setting the backlight. Just don't know which is the correct setting and how i would know is the backlight is correct?
Another option... did you try Leonard's suggestion above for TweakTV?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Another option... did you try Leonard's suggestion above for TweakTV?
Yes I did tried Leonard option but they don't have that model. But I did tried using the Disney W.O.W disc, it did helped. But I think I should go with a professional calibrator. What do you think? I'm wandering is there a difference calibrating a 1080p tv and a 4k tv?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,261 Posts
Go with a professional calibration if you don't mind paying for one., or if you're one of those people (like me) that just needs to know it's right. I'm afraid this is taking us out of my knowledge comfort zone, so I hope someone with more experience will comment.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,557 Posts
Hi mvigo,

I'm in the final stages of securing a THX Video (calibration) certification, just to frame my comments. Taking calibration settings posted on the net and applying to your television is practically the same as taking a lock combination posted on the net and attempting to open a lock at your home. Unfortunately, it doesn't work to be very beneficial.

Working through some of your questions:

1) To set your backlight, you'll need some gear to measure the ft lambert (light output) of your screen in both day and night situations. In leu of hiring a professional who has the gear, you'll need to attempt to set this by judging what feels good to your eyes.

2)You can get the foundations of a decent grayscale (which is akin to properly setting up a canvas before you paint) by using the cinema or movie mode on your set (which will get you much closer to proper calibration levels than any of the other modes) and using your WOW disc to set brightness (the blacks), contrast (the whites), sharpness, making sure your TV is in 1-to-1 pixel mode. If your TV has a blue mode, use it to set blue. If your TV doesn't have a blue mode, then see if you disc has a pair of blue filter glasses. If it doesn't buy the Spears and Munsil HD calibration disc (Amazon.com) and use the blue filter glasses provided with the disc. You can also use the glasses to see if tint needs a tweak (it likely won't).

3)Turn off or minimize frame interpolation (smooth motion) modes.

4) Look at some reference material with good flesh tones (not animation, or green tint film like the Matrix) and see how flesh tones look. If they look natural, then you're in the ballpark.

Honestly, you can't really do a whole lot more with out a professional and professional calibration equipment. While I'm not entirely familiar with the menu options with your set, there's a good chance that a professional would be able to get your TV much closer to an ideal state than any of the available calibration discs. But, if that's not a an option, then use the Spears and Munsil disc and tweak it on your own --- don't plug in calibration numbers off the net.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Todd for the info. I'm going to give a shot this wknd and spent sometime. I'm a little confuse with the other settings like dynamic range, gamma, etc.... how do I know what is the right settings for that. And also are you a professional calibrator?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,557 Posts
Sure thing, Miguel.

Dynamic Range is in reference to the contrast ratio (the lightest vs darkest imaging capabilities of your set). You'll get that dialed in by properly using the the dark and light pluge patterns on the disc. Getting those darks (brightness) and whites (contrast ratio) set correctly are big chunk of getting your TV performing to industry standards (don't forget, get your TV into a cinema or movie mode and then set those values...I'd do it once in a darkened room and then create a separate user mode by redo-ing the calibration in a lit room). Gamma is rather complicated in explanation but essential controls the overall accuracy of a television's greyscale output (which is easiest described as the TV's canvas that it paints color on). In general, you want your TV's gamma to be set around "2.2"... however, just because your TV has a 2.2 setting doesn't mean that's what it's actually achieving (that's where a pro calibrator can help with the proper measurement tools).

The Spears and Munsil disc is nice because it comes with a little guide book that will guide you through the steps you need to take (and helping you to decipher the patterns on the disc). If you don't want to spend $400-$450 for a pro calibration, Spears and Munsil will get you in the general vicinity of a properly calibrated image.

As for myself, I'm close to having the professional tag... just recently completed a 3-day training with THX, passed two exams, and am in the process of submitting actual field calibrations for evaluation by THX. So...very soon! ;-)
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top