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I possess the Pioneer VSX-1017TXV receiver. I'm building a pair of Dayton III speakers for my mains and I'm starting to worry about my receiver driving those 4 ohm speakers. I have a 6 channel setup no sub. The receiver can be switched to handle 6 ohm and 8 ohm speakers and I've read that it will handle them by switching to 6 ohm; however I've also read otherwise. I would hate to lose a practically brand new receiver because of this. Any help will be appreciated!!
 

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That can be an issue. I've been driving 4 Ohm speakers with a receiver that is only rated to drive 6 Ohms. I haven't run into any issues. I read something once that receiver manufacturers often won't rate a receiver for 4 Ohm speakers because there is some additional safety requirement. I don't know if that is true or not. If it is, it is possible that many amps can run 4 Ohm speakers safely even though they may not be rated for it. Perhaps someone else can chime in and refute or confirm and expand on this.
 

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There is often some factor of safety built in to amp specs and rarely will an amp fry right away if it is driving too much current. That being said more current = more heat and heat is what kills electronics. Your Pioneer was not designed to handle the thermal loads of 4 ohm speakers. Whether this means it will burn out in one year or twenty is hard to say and would depend on the design of the reciever, you listening habits, etc.

All this being said unless I was sure it could handle it I wouldn't do it with a new reciever.
 
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So if the heat would be the problem could I find a way to install a silent fan or two inside the receiver's chassis?Right over the vent. I could have the fans mounted inside and have an outboard switch to turn them on outside the case. I would make it to where if needed they can be removed without ever telling they were there.(meaning no screws and/or making any permanent change to the chassis) because I would hate to lose my warranty:sad: This would be the same concept as putting fans into a computer's chassis, which I have done before.
I believe if heat is the main concern it is tweakable to work. I've noticed that receiver needs a fan anyway. It stays pretty warm.

Any input on this suggestion would be awesome.
 
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