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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

Like many of you year, I'm about to finish my basement and turn it in to somewhat of a movie room. Although not a dedicated home theatre room, it will have 7.1 surround sound and a 110" inch projection screen (from an Optoma HD20).

With that said, I need to reduce the amount of sound that travels through the floor to the main level. I wanted to see what successes any of you have had to in that regard. Here are a few things I've yet to determine:

1) Not sure whether it will be a drywall ceiling or suspended tile ceilng. I like the look of drywall best, but with all my pipes in the ceiling (water, gas, etc) suspended may be best for any issues that arise later
2) Either way, I'm guessing that stuffing the celing with insulation is an obvious way to go. However, what thickness do I use? Will R19 be enough? Is R30 too much and would I be paying for more thickness which won't do much more than R19?
3) I've also read about MLV. Does anyone have experience with it? Does it really reduce by 30db? Should I stuff with insulation first followed by MLV?

Sorry for all the questions, but I'm trying to be as thorough as possible as I know it helps to respond. Any and all help appreciated! Thanks
 

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Here is what I did for my ceilings:

Cut 3/8 foam insulation to fit between the joists and installed it (this was to cover any nail / screw protrusions from the floor above)

Cut 5/8 sheetrock to fit between the joists. I put a layer of GG on and installed them by cutting furring strips and screwing the furring strips to the joists

As I was using Whisperclips and res channel and needed to recess them a bit to conserve ceiling height, I cut 2x4 blocks to fit between the joists and nailed those up

Then, I put R19 insulation up

I then installed the whisperclips and channel, made the 1st layer OSB, and then the 2nd layer 5/8 sheetrock with a layer of GG between the 1st and 2nd layer.

The biggest thing is to add as much mass as you can to help deaden the transmission of footsteps on the floor above.

I tried to document that process as much as I could if you want to read more......
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ALM - Thanks for the reply. I've read a little about your build but will have to search for that phase. Thanks for the heads up.

Brad - Thanks for the link! That was a great read. However, my issue (or concern) is almost the opposite. A lot that I read is based on reducing the noise from above you (walking around, creaking, etc.). My MAIN concern is keeping the noise that I create below the floor above. When I watch a movie (or according to my wife, any time I turn the blasted projector on), I want to keep the noise from drifting upstairs. So are the same principles applied to keeping the noise from lifting as it is to keeping the noise from above falling?
 

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HI Osuguy,
Here's another page from the same site:
http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/soundproofing101/room-within-a-room/
It is the same principle if you want to keep your sound in or unwanted sound out; decoupling and adding mass will do the same. You will, no doubt have to do the most work with your low end, so upstairs does not shake,rattle and roll, with your subwoofer. Also making sure you have low end damping in your room will assist the sound quality in your room as well as keep the room modes from making things worse outside.
Any and all penetrations between floors, even a hole the size of a dime will cause problems so sealing and decoupling are key. Pay attention to electrical and mechanical/plumbing pathways for sound to travel.
Cruise around their site and read some of the other pages they have there.
Good Luck
 
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