Home Theater Forum and Systems banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi All!

First of all, I'd like to thank everyone, especially Mr. Bryan.

I am not good at English. Please understand.
I have been reading almost 30 months in this forums and get a lot of good information.
I listen mostly hi-fi music.
Now I'm studying room acoustics and REW 5.0 and tuning my room.
Please let me know what do I do my REW results, especially if something looks wrong.
Comments on my REW results would be very much appreciated.
Thanks!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Picture is also attached.

Picture is also attached.
 

Attachments

·
HTS Senior Moderator
Joined
·
5,288 Posts
Can we turn you 90 degrees?

Sitting as you are is very problematic - seating against a wall, and glass at that, very non-symmetric left to right overall as the plots show, etc.

Bryan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thank you so much for your quick reply.

I have two question.
1. Which is better? (turn right or turn left)
2. If I turn 90 degrees, there are two different sidewall each other.
(one is glass window and the other is gypsum board.)
How can I overcome between the differences? (1st & 2nd reflection, etc.)

Regards
Accuton140
 

·
HTS Senior Moderator
Joined
·
5,288 Posts
I was thinking of facing you so that the glass is on your left. That would give more space behind you. The glass and the wall are both going to be different regardless of orientation. Both will need reflection panels so they will act more similar than different except in the bottom end. I think giving you more space behind will more than offset this.

Bryan
 

·
HTS Senior Moderator
Joined
·
5,288 Posts
The sofa needs to come forward more but the basic layout is better.

Side wall reflections still need to be addressed. The diffusion/diffraction behind you is going to do more harm than good being that close - there's simply not enough room to allow it to work. Besides, in that smaller room, bass control behind you would do a lot more good.

Bryan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Dear Bryan!

Thank you very much for your quick response.
Your comments are helping me a lot.

I'm not good at English.
Your kind understanding would be appreciated.

Drawings are modified according to your comments.
How about?
(Picture is attached)

And I have a few question.

1. The front rounded wall is not in the center.
Does not cause any problems with balance & etc?

2. Do the rounded front wall may play a role as a polycylindrical diffuser?

3. How should I do the distance between the couch and the rearwall?

4. The back wall of the left and right are different types(shapes).
I do not know about the effects.

I would appreciate it if you could explain to me easily.


Best Regards,
accuton140
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Agree with above, having glass behind you would be very detrimental... if you were forced to do it, there should be some sound-absorptive directly behind you, and a fair amount.

Do you have the option to put some absorptive material/foam on the glass at all?

Have you considered facing your couch towards the glass? You will lose overall spaciousness and sense of volume, but you would gain an even/semi-symmetrical distribution of absorption coefficients?

Something you will be battling no matter what your orientation is the parallel walls, and increased possibility of standing waves/flutter/creep/etc. Unless you can treat those glass panels... boy, that's tricky problem! : )
 

·
HTS Senior Moderator
Joined
·
5,288 Posts
One way or the other we need to deal with the glass. While not optimal to have it on one side and not the other, at least with this orientation, you have more space behind you for better bass response.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
@bpape - Do you know of any transparent treatments for glass? I don't think I have myself... I've seen translucent foam (if you want to call it that) but nothing transparent.

I've wondered this in the past : Would it be possible to make an absorber (panel/other) that acts like a cavity absorber for the high-end frequencies but instead of making a cavity/cave shaped object make it look like bubble wrap without the bubbles, in other words like a screen of used paper towel roles piled up, but very small in diamer... use the wall they are placed up against as the third-boundary in the "cave" to retain visibility (like through glass?). Ok, sorry, I'm crazy. : D
 

·
HTS Senior Moderator
Joined
·
5,288 Posts
Nothing that I'm aware of that would actually have an beneficial acoustical properties.

Sorry - not getting the DIY idea and what you're trying to do. Remember that whatever you do (assuming a standard type absorber) must be porous and be able to convert sound waves (motion) into heat thereby absorbing it. Anything that will not do that will be a combination of very very narrow in range and/or simply reflective but without being a true diffuser.

Bryan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Agreed about the above.

So far as room arangments, striclty because of spacial confinments, having the space behind you, I agree, is much better... I still think it's rough having glass to one side, especially a full wall instead of just a window.

Maybe too simple, but there's the meh option of adding some thicker curtains to that wall, at least that way they would not be installed permanently.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top