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Re: Cross-Spectrum Microphone Calibration Service

Over the past week I made another attempt to get phase data for my measurement mics with no success. In the case of BSWA, in what I can only guess is a language-barrier problem, no matter how many times I ask for "phase response" and "phase data" for the MP201, they keep sending me frequency response curves. :(
BSWA finally got back to me with a phase curve (theoretical I suspect) for the MP201 microphone. I'm going to have to spend some time experimenting to see if it's useful, but if it is, I may be adding microphone phase measurements to my repertoire.
 

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Re: Cross-Spectrum Microphone Calibration Service

One other thing - when ordering the calibrated ECM8000s, I've gotten a lot of requests from people (most in this forum) for calibrations down to 10 Hz and up to 25 kHz. My normal default was to do 20Hz to 20kHz, but with so many people asking for the extended frequency response, and me having problems trying to keep track of those requests, I am now generating 10 Hz to 25 kHz FR by default for calibrated ECM8000s.. If you want 10Hz to 25kHz you no longer have to ask, it will come that way.

For microphones sent to me for calibration, those will continue to be 20 to 20 so you'll have to ask for the extended response.

I will also continue to perform 5 Hz calibrations and freq responses at up to additional 2 angles at no charge for the $85 and $100 mics, but again you'll have to ask for those. Also note that asking for those additional measurements may delay your order.
 

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Re: Cross-Spectrum Microphone Calibration Service

so I've been asked here and other places whether ECM8000 have a lot of unit-to-unit variation and I usually answer by pointing to a plot done by someone else that shows a bunch of units compared with each other.

I finally got around to putting together a plot of mics I've sold - this is about 40 mics and represents about 1/3 of the ECM8000's I've measured over the last year (with the bulk of them mics from the newest Behringer run with the serial numbers). Thought people might be interested in seeing it:



Another interesting observation: based on the last bunch of mics I received it seems that the high-frequency variation is based on the location of the mic capsule in the end of the wand - the greater the capsule is recessed compared with another unit, the larger the difference.
 

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Re: Cross-Spectrum Microphone Calibration Service

Good stuff. Looks like the unit to unit variation has a range of around 6db or more on both ends of the spectrum.:gulp:. Calibrating your ECM or buying one with the calibration done already seems like a necessary evil.
 

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Re: Cross-Spectrum Microphone Calibration Service

This data needs to be made into a sticky to emphasize the importance of having some actual reference data rather than making assumptions regarding the response of a mic.
 

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Re: Cross-Spectrum Microphone Calibration Service

This data needs to be made into a sticky to emphasize the importance of having some actual reference data rather than making assumptions regarding the response of a mic.
So long as you keep the title intact, feel free to use/distribute the plot for whatever.
 

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Re: Cross-Spectrum Microphone Calibration Service

I've gotten a couple of inquiries about sound level meter measurements, so let me formalize the policy:

I will perform on-axis and random incidence (free field) measurements of any SLM for $60 (which includes return shipping). That will include measurements at A/C/flat weighting as desired (one, or all of the above). This will use the same free-field testing method as my mic meaurements and will be non-NIST traceable. You can see a sample report of a sound meter calibration here (C-weighting only in this example). The typical report will be given for 10Hz to 25kHz but I'll go down to 5Hz upon request.

If you have a sound level meter with a 1/2-inch microphone (like the Galaxy CM-140, Tenma/Extech/etc lines or any number of meters, but not the Radio Shack meters) I can also perform a NIST traceable calibration and adjustment of the meter at 125 Hz, 250 Hz, 500 Hz and 1000 Hz and 74/84/94/104/114 dB. If the pressure field-to-free field adjustment data is available, I can also give you data at 2000 Hz and 4000 Hz. The price for this service is $30, including return shipping. You get a much simplified report showing the 20 (or 30) data points plotted against the ANSI limits and a table with the relative levels.

The price for the combined free-field measurements and the calibration-level adjustment is $75 - that is, that's the price for mere mortals. If you mention Home Theater Shack when you contact me, I'll do everything for $65 (return shipping included). As with the mic cal, I should be able to turn around the unit in 48-hours after receiving it.

For those that don't want to part with their meter, you can buy an acoustic calibrator (that typically calibrate at one or two levels and one or two frequencies) for a couple of hundred bucks.

One thing to be aware of - the absolute calibration level of your meter will drift with changing temperature, humidity and altitude, so don't expect that any adjustment I can do will be spot on for ever. If you are really looking for your meter to be calibrated to a high degree of accuracy on a regular basis, it might be worthwhile to invest in an acoustic calibrator.
 

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Re: Cross-Spectrum Microphone Calibration Service

Hello,
First, I have to say that my english is not fluent and I will try to do my best to improve it : I apologize for that :hide:
second, it's my first post, and I expect to be in the "tolerance 0" of this forum, because I did'nt understand the entire rules that I agreed ...
Third: thank you Herb for your explanations, even though I don't understand every thing.

My questions to Herb:
I have a microphone from my pioneer audio/video multi-channel receiver with mcacc auto-calibration system.
Q1:Is-it possible to send you this microphone (the only one I have) to have a file of its calibration (10-25KHz) to use it with REW software ?
Q2: when you wrote "65$ for the combined free-field measurements and the calibration-level adjustment ", is it the same price when the microphone comes from France ? (that's why my english is not good :duh:)
Q3: is there somewhere an explanation about a "NIST traceable calibration" ? because in the example of calibration it's written that's it's not a NIST traceable calibration. So what a Nist Traceable calibration has special ? is it a certificate which proves that the calibration is under NIST standard and is as "true" as possible ?

Sorry for this questions so simple compared the others you debate here.
 

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Re: Cross-Spectrum Microphone Calibration Service

Sorry Tchao, I didn't see this post.

Hello,

My questions to Herb:
I have a microphone from my pioneer audio/video multi-channel receiver with mcacc auto-calibration system.
Q1:Is-it possible to send you this microphone (the only one I have) to have a file of its calibration (10-25KHz) to use it with REW software ?
I don't know - if the microphone has conventional power and signal connections, then yes, but if it uses some propriety Pioneer connection, then no.

Q2: when you wrote "65$ for the combined free-field measurements and the calibration-level adjustment ", is it the same price when the microphone comes from France ? (that's why my english is not good :duh:)
I would have to charge extra for the international shipping. And don't worry about your English, it's much better than my French ;)

Q3: is there somewhere an explanation about a "NIST traceable calibration" ? because in the example of calibration it's written that's it's not a NIST traceable calibration. So what a Nist Traceable calibration has special ? is it a certificate which proves that the calibration is under NIST standard and is as "true" as possible ?
In short, NIST-traceable basically means that the process and techniques used in the calibration can be traced back to techniques outlined in standards recognized by the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (usually ANSI, IEC, ISO, ASTM, etc standards) and the instrumentation used in the process have been calibrated by NIST or a NIST-accredited laboratory. Essentially is means that the NIST-traceable calibration would hold up in a court of law.

Now the processes I use for the calibration are consistent with IEC 60268 methods and the equipment I use have been calibrated by NIST-traceable labs. If I wanted to go through the process of performing a statistical analysis of my methods using NVLAP methods I could probably assert NIST-traceability, but I don't want to deal with the potential liability issues so I just slap "not NIST traceable" on the reports to reduce the chance of lawsuits.

The point calibrations at 125, 250, 500 and 1000 Hz use an acoustic calibrator that meets ANSI S1.40 and has been calibrated by an accredited 3rd party lab so I have to problem asserting NIST traceability for those measurements.
 

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Re: Cross-Spectrum Microphone Calibration Service

Just as an FYI, it took me a while but I finally have inventory again for the "full" calibrated units so I'm back to same-day shipping for orders placed before 1pm eastern time. I have a limited number of the "basic" calibration so I imagine those will get backordered pretty quickly.

Please note that "special orders" (extended freq response, multiple angles, etc) will still take 4-5 business days to ship.

Also, summer tends to be a busy time for my noise control-consulting business. If you want to send me a mic to cal but you need it back quickly, please contact me, before you mail it so I can see if I can fit it into my schedule. If you just send it, it may be a week or so before I can get it back to you.
 

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Re: Cross-Spectrum Microphone Calibration Service

This is very useful info Anechoic! Thanks for all the info and link to the acoustic calibrator.

I'm looking for a link to your site (for purchase of a calibrated mic) but cannot seem to find it in your alias pop-up.
 

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Re: Cross-Spectrum Microphone Calibration Service

I added it to my profile so when you click on "Visit Anechoic's homepage!" under "Anechoic" it goes to that page. Is that what you meant?
 

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Re: Cross-Spectrum Microphone Calibration Service

I added it to my profile so when you click on "Visit Anechoic's homepage!" under "Anechoic" it goes to that page. Is that what you meant?
Yep! :bigsmile: Thanks a lot, this was what I was looking for in the first place and could not find a link.

Thanks!
Ray
 

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Re: Cross-Spectrum Microphone Calibration Service

Sorry Tchao, I didn't see this post.

No problem !

I don't know - if the microphone has conventional power and signal connections, then yes, but if it uses some propriety Pioneer connection, then no.
it's a microphone with a jack connexion and no power, only the jack connexion. I tried it with REW, it works well, but without a calibration file it's not really usefull ...
thank you for the answers, I will contact you by email as "Tchao", just to have the link of this conversation.

Bye :wave:
 

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Anechoic,

Hi! Just placed an order for a full spectrum ECM8000. Just a question, I also have a dbx RTA-M mic. Is it worth getting this one calibrated (would it be more accurate than the ECM8000)? Just wondering if the capsule in the dbx is better than the Behringer version.

Thanks,
Ray
 

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Anechoic,

Hi! Just placed an order for a full spectrum ECM8000. Just a question, I also have a dbx RTA-M mic. Is it worth getting this one calibrated (would it be more accurate than the ECM8000)? Just wondering if the capsule in the dbx is better than the Behringer version.

Thanks,
Ray
Just got your order and I'll be shipping it shortly.

As for the RTA-M, I've measured a few of them (in fact I own one that came with my Sencore RTA) and they're more consistent from unit-to-unit but they still have the upper frequency diffraction bump that most mics have, although it's higher in frequency than the ECM800's because of the smaller diameter of the ECM8k.

I haven't taken one apart, but I would be surprised if the RTA-M and the ECM8000 used different mic capsules (or at least unrelated capsules). I suspect that dbx's OEM is more careful in assembling the units which accounts for their better consistency. But that's speculation on my part.
 

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Just got your order and I'll be shipping it shortly.

As for the RTA-M, I've measured a few of them (in fact I own one that came with my Sencore RTA) and they're more consistent from unit-to-unit but they still have the upper frequency diffraction bump that most mics have, although it's higher in frequency than the ECM800's because of the smaller diameter of the ECM8k.

I haven't taken one apart, but I would be surprised if the RTA-M and the ECM8000 used different mic capsules (or at least unrelated capsules). I suspect that dbx's OEM is more careful in assembling the units which accounts for their better consistency. But that's speculation on my part.
Thanks Anechoic!!! I'll let you know when I receive the mic. As far as the RTA-M, is the price of calibration the same as the ECM8000? I think it would still be nice to have it calibrated if I plan to use it at all. If you need to PM me the info (not sure if price/etc allowed in thread forums), that would be fine.

Ray
 
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