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What would make one choose the Dayton over the Behringer, or vice versa?
Behringer: higher quality accessories (case, mic clip), lower output impedance so it will be easier for low-quality pre-amps to drive.

Dayton: generally flatter response, lower noise floor, better unit-to-unit consistency.

IMO, as long as you have a decent quality pre-amp, the Dayton wins.
 

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Behringer: higher quality accessories (case, mic clip), lower output impedance so it will be easier for low-quality pre-amps to drive.

Dayton: generally flatter response, lower noise floor, better unit-to-unit consistency.

IMO, as long as you have a decent quality pre-amp, the Dayton wins.
Thanks. I have a browser tab open now on my PayPal account.

And thanks for extending the discount!

Jeff
 

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Reason # 5009 why you should never trust an out-of-the box ECM8000 for critical measurements:



I'm selling this mic as a Premium+ for $65 since I can't bring myself to charge full price for this.

HTS members will get $5 off, leave your username in the "message to seller" box on the PayPal checkout page and I'll refund the $5.
 

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Hey all,

I do have a small bit of bad news: my costs have have been going up over the last 10 months or so - the wholesale prices for both the Behringer and Dayton mics have increased and there was an increase in USPS shipping rates back in January. I ate the costs, but with some other costs increasing, I am going to have to raise my calibrated mic pricing. The plan is to raise prices by $5 across the board for all my mics (but not the meter).

Two bits of good news: one, I'm going to wait until late May/early June to raise the prices. I'm announcing the increase early because I know that as a consumer myself, I hate when prices unexpectedly rise overnight, so as a believer in the "do unto others" mantra I am extending a courtesy that I would like to see vendors extend to me.

The second bit of good news: I've been offering a $5 discount for HTS members on the Dayton mics and I've occasionally offered discounts on the Behringer mics. I will carry the discount forward for the Dayton mics and I will offer a permanent $5 discount for HTS members on the Behringer mics as well, so in effect HTS members won't see a price increase for those mics.

Thanks guys, I appreciate the business and I appreciate HTS for giving me the opportunity to share.
 

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Hello

I have ECM8000 stock unit and I would like to upgrade it to some much better, say beyond 1db precision within 15Hz-25Khz.. I got a warm recommendation for the calibrated Dayton EMM-6

1) I do not see the specification though, is it really 1db precision?
2) It is possible to buy the mic here: http://www.parts-express.com/pe/show...number=390-801 for 48$, and then download the calibration file free of charge. Where is the difference .. from the Basic calibration?
3) I do not understand the application of different measurements (Basic+, Premium, Premium+) to Room EQWizard. How REW is going to use the calibration files? E.g. is it going to influence phase measurements, waterfalls in REW? How?
4) I have Tascam US-122, I hope it is still good for Dayton..

thanks,
Michael
 

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Hello

I have ECM8000 stock unit and I would like to upgrade it to some much better, say beyond 1db precision within 15Hz-25Khz.. I got a warm recommendation for the calibrated Dayton EMM-6

1) I do not see the specification though, is it really 1db precision?
2) It is possible to buy the mic here: http://www.parts-express.com/pe/show...number=390-801 for 48$, and then download the calibration file free of charge. Where is the difference .. from the Basic calibration?
3) I do not understand the application of different measurements (Basic+, Premium, Premium+) to Room EQWizard. How REW is going to use the calibration files? E.g. is it going to influence phase measurements, waterfalls in REW? How?
4) I have Tascam US-122, I hope it is still good for Dayton..

thanks,
Michael
Not Herb, but the "precision" comes from the calibration that he does, i.e. the precision is in the calibration file that he generates in that it precisely (within the stated tolerance) matches the response of the mic.

I have the Tascam, too, and just bought the Dayton Basic +. That level gives you calibration files for 0, 45 and 90 degrees. Zero and 90 are likely to be the only two that you use.

Jeff
 

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Thanks,
I understand.

I see yet that the .CAL files are different from the .FRD as they do not have the phase information.
Does it mean that going beyond Basic has no effect?

Also, what is the difference between this and the personal calibration Daytone gives away now (for free)?
 

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Hello

I have ECM8000 stock unit and I would like to upgrade it to some much better, say beyond 1db precision within 15Hz-25Khz.. I got a warm recommendation for the calibrated Dayton EMM-6

1) I do not see the specification though, is it really 1db precision?
If you mean 1 dB precision out-of-the-box without the use of a calibration file, you might get lucky and get an EMM-6 (or ECM8000) that flat, but it's been months since I've seen a Dayton (and years since I've seen a Behringer) with that kind of accuracy. There's a reason why pro mics from Earthworks, ACO Pacific, Bruel & Kjaer et all (which do have guaranteed +/- 1 dB or better accuracy) cost so much.

Now with a calibration file, yes, you can get accuracy in that ballpark.


2) It is possible to buy the mic here: http://www.parts-express.com/pe/show...number=390-801 for 48$, and then download the calibration file free of charge. Where is the difference .. from the Basic calibration?
There are two differences between the stock Dayton units and the calibration Daytons I sell:

1) The stock Dayton correction curve bandwidth is 20 Hz to 20 kHz, while my mics are calibrated from 5 Hz to 25 kHz.

2) I believe that my correction curves are more accurate than the stock curves (I have written up my procedures and some comparisons between my measurement results and the results generated by NIST-traceable labs in other threads).

That said, the stock Dayton curves are certainly in the ballpark, so if all you need is 20 Hz to 20 kHz data for the lowest price, I would recommend just buying the stock Dayton straight from PE.

3) I do not understand the application of different measurements (Basic+, Premium, Premium+) to Room EQWizard. How REW is going to use the calibration files? E.g. is it going to influence phase measurements, waterfalls in REW? How?
Although both the EMM-6 and ECM8000 mics are marketed as "omnidirectional" microphones, they are only omnidirectional up to around 1-2 kHz. Above that, the frequency response of the mics will depend on the orientation of the mic with respect to the sound source (in particular the mics become less sensitive to higher frequencies as the mic is pointed away from the source). If you want to use the mic for loudspeaker measurements (where the mic is usually pointed directly at the speaker) or for low-frequency measurements (where the mics are truly omnidirectional) than the non-plus mics will work fine.

However in room acoustics applications where the mic is picking up sound waves that are bouncing off the walls/ceiling/floor and arriving at the mic in arbitrary directions, the additional frequency response correction curves allow the user greater flexibility in using the mics. For room-correction/room acoustics applications, I typically recommend pointing the microphone straight up at the ceiling (with a slight tilt toward the main speakers) and using the 90-degree correction curve.

4) I have Tascam US-122, I hope it is still good for Dayton..
The Tascam will be fine.
 

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Herb,

given that at 5Hz, the error range is 10db, what is the usable frequency range of EMM-6?
Also, taking humidity, temperature and other environmental factors, what would be the real-life precision of the calibrated EMM-6 across that range? Better than 3db? Better than 1db?
If I put the 'wind shield' on the mic, will it reflect the measurements?

thanks
 

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However in room acoustics applications where the mic is picking up sound waves that are bouncing off the walls/ceiling/floor and arriving at the mic in arbitrary directions, the additional frequency response correction curves allow the user greater flexibility in using the mics. For room-correction/room acoustics applications, I typically recommend pointing the microphone straight up at the ceiling (with a slight tilt toward the main speakers) and using the 90-degree correction curve.
Received your 8000 a couple of weeks back and I am having a blast using it. I am using the 90-degree correction curve and pointing the mic up with a slight tilt towards the speaker I am testing. I wonder what kind of inaccuracies in the higher frequencies, if any, are there with the interaction of a hard (low, about 7 feet) surface ceiling. Perhaps I should use the 45-degree curve instead?

-Tony
 

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Herb,

given that at 5Hz, the error range is 10db, what is the usable frequency range of EMM-6?
I'm not sure I understand the question. With a correction curve, the usaable range is 5 Hz to 25 kHz. Without a correction curve, it's probably something like 80 Hz to 6 kHz.

Also, taking humidity, temperature and other environmental factors, what would be the real-life precision of the calibrated EMM-6 across that range? Better than 3db? Better than 1db?
Environmental factors won't make a huge different unless you're using them in extremes (0 degrees F, 120 degrees F in the rain, etc). If you are using the mic in a standard comfortable environment (say 60-80 degrees F, 20-70% humidity), the differences in the mic response are on the order of tenths of decibiels.

If I put the 'wind shield' on the mic, will it reflect the measurements?
The windscreen changes the response by about 0.5 to 1 dB above ~ 12 kHz.
 

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Received your 8000 a couple of weeks back and I am having a blast using it. I am using the 90-degree correction curve and pointing the mic up with a slight tilt towards the speaker I am testing. I wonder what kind of inaccuracies in the higher frequencies, if any, are there with the interaction of a hard (low, about 7 feet) surface ceiling. Perhaps I should use the 45-degree curve instead?

-Tony
It's going to depend on how diffuse the sound field is in your room. If there's is a lot of energy coming from the ceiling, you might want to experiment with the 45 or 0 curves, but if the reflections are more random and coming in all directions, stick with the 90.

Experiment, and then figure out what sounds better to your ears.
 

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It's going to depend on how diffuse the sound field is in your room. If there's is a lot of energy coming from the ceiling, you might want to experiment with the 45 or 0 curves, but if the reflections are more random and coming in all directions, stick with the 90.

Experiment, and then figure out what sounds better to your ears.
Is the orientation/cal used driven by the measurement being taken, e.g. 0° for the FR of an individual speaker, but 90° for decay/RT?

Jeff
 

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How do I know how diffuse my room is or how much energy is coming from the ceiling? I don't want to trust my ears first, I want to know what is correct, then I can tell my ears that it is correct and then choose what sounds good to me.
 

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How do I know how diffuse my room is or how much energy is coming from the ceiling? I don't want to trust my ears first, I want to know what is correct, then I can tell my ears that it is correct and then choose what sounds good to me.
Diffuse means that reflections have an equal probability of coming from any direction and it's a matter of how reflective the surfaces in your room are. If you have an empty four-sided with a floor and ceiling, and all 6 surfaces are acoustically "hard" you can consider that to be a diffuse environment (for the pendants out there, I'm simplifying) where reflections will be bouncing around between the surfaces in all directions. At the other extreme, if the four walls and floor are completely covered in absorptive material (thick carpet, thick curtains, etc) but the ceiling is still acoustically hard, most of the reflections in the room will be coming from the ceiling and the room is not diffuse.

The 0-degree curve should be used when the mic is pointed in the direction of the sound source (or the reflection source if it's known and dominant). As the source of reflections become more spread out, you move toward the off-axis correction curves.
 
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