Home Theater Forum and Systems banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been following some of the sub-woofer horn threads here and have been quite fascinated by the results. I recently came across CSS's new TRIO12 Bass Horn Kit* and have been wondering if anyone has built it yet what their impressions are.

On the chance that someone has... I have a few questions.

1) I'm comfortable with power tools from years of building houses and kitchen cabinets but those seem pretty simple in comparison. Is this kit something a novice can do?

2) The PDF from the web site states: "...for most builders, using standard 3/4" MDF or birch-ply is probably out of the question. The box, internal baffles and bracing would weigh a ton." What would be used instead? I'm not overly concerned about weight as I would assemble it in place.

3) The diagrams show the opening in the long side side. Could the opening be at the "top" instead?

4) I know this is a long shot but if there is anyone in the Okanagan that has built this, could I come by and check it out?

Thanks in advance for any responses!

*http://creativesound.ca/details.php?model=TRIO12HORNKIT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
Hey there!

I am one of the people who did the Prototype testing on the original unit. The horn put out more bass than a room full of enthusiasts knew what to do with. One guy stood up and said, "I haven't heard [Organ music] sound like that since I was in front of the original organ.

It is very natural, Almost too clean. When using it with synthetic bass instead of real bass, it can actually seem to be overpowering. I managed to clear the room in about 30 seconds when I put on a bass track that is centered around 25hz. lol.

A few guys stuck around for the subwoofer testing, and i'm absolutely brutal on subwoofers. I had the floor of the building (wooden floor) oscillating to the beat a good .25 inches. All that on a single 12" woofer, and about 30w of power.

FWIW the room was roughly 30x17" with windows down one side, and a slanted wooden ceiling. (kind of like a cabin) I could see people cringing as the bass levels got uncomfortable to them.

Almost as much extension as my SDX 15 LLT (14 cubes internal tuned to ~16hz) But definitely more authority. Which i have to say, is impressive for a 12" driver. The horn itself is very optimized though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,397 Posts
1) I'm comfortable with power tools from years of building houses and kitchen cabinets but those seem pretty simple in comparison. Is this kit something a novice can do?

2) The PDF from the web site states: "...for most builders, using standard 3/4" MDF or birch-ply is probably out of the question. The box, internal baffles and bracing would weigh a ton." What would be used instead? I'm not overly concerned about weight as I would assemble it in place.

3) The diagrams show the opening in the long side side. Could the opening be at the "top" instead?
1. Follow the plans exactly and you won't have a problem.

2. The horn plans are designed for 1/2" material.

3. I'm not sure about this one, hopefully the designer will chime in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
I can Answer 3 for you, Yes it can be altered as to where to mouth is. The current position is the most optimized however, and performance may change slightly due to alteration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Yes it can be altered as to where to mouth is. The current position is the most optimized however, and performance may change slightly due to alteration.
Thanks. My question was based on using it in a room that is roughly 15'x20'. If one of these is enough (and from your previous response I'm sure it is) then the mouth is fine where the plans put it and there's no need for me to change it.

I'm toying with the idea of building it into a riser though. How much space would be required in front of the mouth? (or how close can my front row of seating be to it?) Are there any issues with putting a grill on it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
580 Posts
I may be able to add a bit of information.

I designed the box.


Yes you can change the orientation of the mouth.

The prototype had the mouth on the end . It should stay the same surface area.

As for building it.

If you have built cabinets and such you are well on the way to it's creation.

There are a few 45 degree angles. But almost all the rest can be done by simple butting them together and being liberal with the recommended adhesive. In this case PL premium. Has stupendous gap filling properties.

As for building it It is recommended that you use 1/2" material. It will weigh in at about 189 lbs with the driver. Not a toy.

Material can be as inexpensive as OSB if you so desire. That is what the prototype was made from as a point of construction. Makes a great riser. WE were walking on top of it quite a bit. I'm not to small of a guy. I weigh 240lbs and I walked on the sub with no flexure in the panels. I actually spent more money on adhesive then I did on sheeting. OSB is plenty strong enough if you follow intelligent bracing methods as shown in the build manual.

Mark
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
I may be able to add a bit of information.

I designed the box.


Yes you can change the orientation of the mouth.

The prototype had the mouth on the end . It should stay the same surface area.

As for building it.

If you have built cabinets and such you are well on the way to it's creation.

There are a few 45 degree angles. But almost all the rest can be done by simple butting them together and being liberal with the recommended adhesive. In this case PL premium. Has stupendous gap filling properties.

As for building it It is recommended that you use 1/2" material. It will weigh in at about 189 lbs with the driver. Not a toy.

Material can be as inexpensive as OSB if you so desire. That is what the prototype was made from as a point of construction. Makes a great riser. WE were walking on top of it quite a bit. I'm not to small of a guy. I weigh 240lbs and I walked on the sub with no flexure in the panels. I actually spent more money on adhesive then I did on sheeting. OSB is plenty strong enough if you follow intelligent bracing methods as shown in the build manual.

Mark

! ITS ME!!! LOL! I'm the guy laying down on that subwoofer. I told you I knew it first hand. lol.:rofl:
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top