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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I sold my Denon 4306 to a friend, and he is now having problems where the receiver shuts off after just a second or two at high volumes. I have tried a few things, and I can say that it happens with different sources, on different HDMI inputs, with and without the subwoofer on. just wondering if it might be a setting, or if it is something else whether someone could point me to a likely culprit. Thanks in advance.

George
 

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Usually caused by a couple strands of speaker wire touching the wrong terminals on the back of the receiver. Also, what are his speakers? If they have low impedance (4 ohm) they are harder to drive and may cause receiver to go into protection mode at high volumes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
He has new Def Tech speakers. Looks like all 8 ohm impedance. I will have him check the connections. Thanks.
 

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He says he checked the connections and they all look good. Next step? I was thinking about having him disconnect the speakers one at a time and see if he still gets the problem, to see if it is one of his connections and he missed it. Barring that, could it be something blown in the receiver?
 

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Does seem a little odd. I assume it is going into Protection Mode when it shuts off? Really does sound like a loose wire or strand touching. Has he checked the connections at the speaker as well as the receiver?
Is it getting hot? In a cabinet with little ventilation? If everything else is good, could be the protection circuit is faulty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah, looks like protection mode. He says he checked the connections. He has it in a pretty tight spot, but it doesn't seem to have had enough time to overheat before it cuts out. He has def tech fronts with the subs in them. Currently he is running both speaker wire and RCA to them. Does he need to worry about crossover levels maybe? Also, should the fronts be set to small? Thanks.
 

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George,

I understand you as I sold a friend a Marantz 5004. Same complaint. When I have visited him I have learnt that high level means maximum, with horrible distortions he never noticed. In addition the main music played was mp3, a killer for amps and speakers. Mostly, the amp went into protection, when he was excited and drunk. And the speakers were power hungry with a 86 db sensivity. Are you in the same situation?
tba
 

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Not sure if this will help but I just had a very similar problem. At high volume maybe half or a little louder my Yamaha would shut down. First thing I checked were the connections both on the spkrs and on the rcvr. I had some loose banana plugs. The next day tried the system out again it was better but it still shut down. I then tried to isolate where the problem was located. You can either play one speaker at a time or do it in groups.( turn the volume up to where it was shutting down ) I did front L/R/C then SR and finally SB. I found one of my Surround back speakers kept causing the rcvr to shut down. At normal levels you would never notice there is a problem it plays great. I ran the test tone from the rcvr and found the tweeter in one of them was going bad. I swapped tweeters to see if it was either the x-over or the tweeter, in my case the sound was the same the tweeter is bad. This may not be your problem but it might help you find the problem.
 

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nef477 is probably on to something. Sometimes when a speaker blows the voice coil can get a small hole in it causing + & - lines to short. Depending where the damage is; the circuit may ground when the driver exertion is high (high volume causes woofer to move farther away from the cabinet).
 

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hi, its because for all SS amps/ recievers once they exceed a certain level of their performance. they will auto shut down into a thermal mood. this is what we call clipping point. Prolong will only cause more injuries to the amp..of course, wirings do play a part too..
 

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hi, its because for all SS amps/ recievers once they exceed a certain level of their performance. they will auto shut down into a thermal mood. this is what we call clipping point. Prolong will only cause more injuries to the amp..of course, wirings do play a part too..
Clipping doesn't directly cause excessive heat or send an amp into protect mode. Clipping means the sign wave's amplitude exceeds the capability of the amp or, more typically, the speakers. Clipping does cause many bad things but typically those negative consequences are visited on the drivers/speakers as opposed to the amplifier

For am amp to got into thermal protect the amp will have to be running very hot. Typically well over 120°F. Thermal protect wouldn't trip as soon as a certain volume was reached.

Protect mode is there to protect the amp form a short circuit that can and will directly damage the amplifier.
 

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Clipping doesn't directly cause excessive heat or send an amp into protect mode. Clipping means the sign wave's amplitude exceeds the capability of the amp or, more typically, the speakers. Clipping does cause many bad things but typically those negative consequences are visited on the drivers/speakers as opposed to the amplifier

For am amp to got into thermal protect the amp will have to be running very hot. Typically well over 120°F. Thermal protect wouldn't trip as soon as a certain volume was reached.

Protect mode is there to protect the amp form a short circuit that can and will directly damage the amplifier.
i know if u read clearly... i wrote something like exceed its performance . n my wrong too as my English is bad .should be hibernation mode, not thermal.

Sent from my GT-N7105 using Tapatalk
 
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