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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, I'm new here. English is not my primary language so please be patient :innocent:

I've just bought two behringer deq2496 and an ecm8000 mic to calibrate my home theater.
One deq will be used for the front speakers and the other for sub and center speaker. Since I'm 100% newbie about this, I'd like to start with the sub and leave the other deq in a closet for now.
So, what do I have to do now? I've read in the manual that the DEQ has a real time analysys feature and an Auto-EQ function: do I have to use them?

Thank you, and sorry for the "low-level" questions, but as I said I'm just entering in this world.

Bye
Francesco
 

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Welcome to the Forum, Francesco!


I've read in the manual that the DEQ has a real time analysys feature and an Auto-EQ function: do I have to use them?
You can try to use the auto EQ function, but sometimes those things don’t work so well, especially at low frequencies. For the sub, it would be best to use our free Room EQ Wizard software program and equalize it manually. You already have a measurement mic; all you’d need is an SPL meter and suitable USB sound card to use the program.

Regards,
Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well, after asking for a soundcard with xlr mic input... I've just placed an order for a behringer uca202 soundcard and a behringer xenyx 502, lol :D
I've seen that other people use this combo, which is even cheaper than a dedicated soundcard, and I can use the uca202 as a normal soundcard for my netbook.
 

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Use REW to figure out what needs to be adjusted.

The auto EQ feature on the DEQ is more suited for live/PA sound equalizing at best,and it only uses the graphic EQ for adjustment which isn't precise enough for the lower end.
 

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I think you'll find that even the deq manual does not recommend auto eq under 80 hz..from memory that is.

Also you will have to try the different equalizer types from the pull down menu, offhand I can't tell you which one it is. REW will give a Q value of 0.5 say, of course when you plug it into the deq you will 'convert' it mentally to 1/2. Similarly with 0.75 etc etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for your reply.
I've installed REW and made some measurements. After that I used the PEQ function on the behringer to insert the suggested filters, but sometimes I cannot set the precise frequencies (ie: rew tells me to make a change at, say, 35hz but the PEQ only has 30hz or 40hz). Is there a way to solve this problem?
Should I use other features, like FBD?

Thank you :)
 

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there should not be such a big difference between what REW says and what you can actually input on the deq.

The deq has a 'coarse' frequency setting and a 'fine' setting. You need to press the big knob to switch between the two.

Example....if you are in 'coarse' mode, the frequency will change very quickly when you rotate the knob. If you get to (say) 40 hz in your example, and the next frequency gives you 30 hz (say), then you need to press the big knob and then you could go from 40 hz to 38 hz (say).

Try it, it is easy once you know how.
 

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It worked, now I can be more accurate when setting up filters :D
Yeah, the manual is not much help with stuff like that eh?? It presumes an existing level of knowledge, which I certainly did not have when I first bought it.

Haha, it was actually the cat brushing up against the big button that first alerted me! else I would prob have never found it.

Just make sure you use the right equalizer type in REW (very close but not exact) and you'll be set to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I've read here on the forums that selecting the FBQ2496 will be fine except for the automatic filters export from REW to the DEQ, which is not a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well, it seems to me that my subwoofer sounds much better now. Still a lot of work to do, I think, but I'm happy with the results. I've noticed that the volume is lower than before and I've had to turn the volume control to compensate. Is it normal? Have I done something wrong?
 

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sounds better is always a good start don't you think?

you might learn how to post graphs, people can better help you then.

ultimately it is the sound YOU like not someone else or some ideal 'on a graph'.

And, without seeing anything we are only left with our interpretation of what you wrote...which may not be what you meant!

Anyway, it is always possible that you have tamed a large peak, and so now have to raise the overall level to compensate.

whatever, tons of answers, before and after would help.

the main thing is that you are happier now than before, and since you have only just started there could be much further improvements yet.
 

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Welcome to the Forum, Francesco!


You can try to use the auto EQ function, but sometimes those things don’t work so well, especially at low frequencies. For the sub, it would be best to use our free Room EQ Wizard software program and equalize it manually. You already have a measurement mic; all you’d need is an SPL meter and suitable USB sound card to use the program.

Regards,
Wayne
Hi all, I am new here and will introduce myself in a seperate post. However, I picked up on this post because of the reference to the Behringer Ultracurve, which we have incoporated into a PA system. Although we have the ECM8000 measurement mic I am interested to know how an SPL meter can help with the room setup?

Thanks

Andy
 

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Hi Andy,

“Room set up” is not the same for a PA system as it is for a home theater (and this is a home theater forum). In a home theater, the SPL meter is used, along with a “rotating” pink noise signal, to match the volume levels of the front speakers and rear surround speakers. Naturally, that exercise is unnecessary with a PA system. With a PA system, the primary use for a SPL meter is to check how loud the system is being run.

Regards,
Wayne
 

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Hi Andy,

“Room set up” is not the same for a PA system as it is for a home theater (and this is a home theater forum). In a home theater, the SPL meter is used, along with a “rotating” pink noise signal, to match the volume levels of the front speakers and rear surround speakers. Naturally, that exercise is unnecessary with a PA system. With a PA system, the primary use for a SPL meter is to check how loud the system is being run.

Regards,
Wayne
Hi Wayne,

Many thanks for your prompt reply.

Ok, so for trying to EQ our PA install, we will not need to incorporate an SPL meter, but I am hoping the the Room EQ Wizard will help us to understand where our missing frequencies are?

I am going to map our system as a diagram and then will post a new thread indicating what we have tried so far in the hope that somebody will be able to provide some ideas, etc.

Andy
 
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