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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello

I have been checking some site where to buy a driver to build my first Subwoofer. Since I live in Europa and all sites I have checked are abroad, I am trying to find salers in europe.

If someone knowns... I will be pleased.

But my question is more.... What is the difference between a Bass driver and Woofer Driver?
Can I build a Subwoofer with a Bass driver?

I am asking because I found a site in denmark and in the range they have: Bass range.

Thansk to all
Akasha
 

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There are subwoofers and woofers. A subwoofer plays the lowest frequencies, from less than 20 hz to 120hz. A woofer plays higher frequencies, 40 hz to 1000 hz or higher. "Bass driver" is a general term and usually refers to a woofer.
Welllllll......maybe and maybe not.

Woofers are bass drivers. Bass drivers are woofers. Both are designed to be good at reproducing the bass frequencies of music, defined, generally, as the bottom-3 octaves* from 20 - 160Hz. The definition of a subwoofer (and its driver(s)) is more vague, but certainly SWs apply their efforts to the lower half of the bass range, that being 20 - around 60Hz, and some of them have useful energy below 20Hz.

Lower-frequency drivers that are useful in the midrange, and 1000HZ is certainly MR, are bass/midrange drivers, often called, inaccurately IMO, midbass drivers. I believe the latter label is inaccurate and even misleading, as midbass is just ONE octave of the bass frequencies. I believe 'bass/midrange' (B/MR) is a more-useful label.

I think 'bass driver' and 'woofer' are the same kinds of drivers with different labels. A subwoofer driver is a special woofer designed for the lowest half (and below) of the bass frequencies.

NOT to confuse you but perhaps to illustrate the vagueness of all these terms, SWs can indeed be built with plain-old-ordinary 'woofers', and if designed correctly can work VERY well in the 2 octaves from around 15Hz thru 60Hz. My supersubwoofers...

...are built with Sonic Craft's SC300 bass drivers (they're NOT 'subwoofer' drivers) and sound fabulous in the 14 - 60Hz range.


* An octave is a doubling of frequency, so low bass is 20 - 40Hz, midbass is 40 - 80Hz, and upperbass is 80 - 160Hz. The typical 3/4-size upright bass's lowest string, the E, has a fundamental frequency of 42HZ. Full-size basses used in symphony orchestras have string extenders so that they can reach low-C, the opening tone of Richard Strauss's Also Sprach Zarathustra, used in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Great post....

And you speakers are great.
I want to build a subwoofer for my home cinema.
I know that I want kind of a horn sub... simple... not very complicated. or simply a sub that I can feel the movie... explosions... things like that. And also for music... right now my stereo leacks Bass..

So for start I want something simple... that can do the job in the begining... and then start to explore more the speakers building.



Akasha
 

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'And you speakers are great.' TY; I spent a lot of time (but, interestingly, not lots of money--sometimes DIY projects work that way) on them. They look a little better now since I painted them wall color; I'll be putting simple cloth grilles on them too...but I sure like the looks of all those drivers. :bigsmile:

'I know that I want kind of a horn sub... simple... not very complicated." IMO, those are contradicting terms. Horn subs are NOT simple. If you want to build a simple SW, simply use a solid box and a plate amp.
 

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I just want to inject this so theres less confusion. A "woofer" is a generic term for the type of driver it is, not at all necessarily what it plays. there are sub-woofers, mid-woofers, full range-woofers, and a few others i cant think of right now.

Figuring out if something will work in a certain setup takes sometime and a bit of help to get what you want/expect.

"I know that I want kind of a horn sub... simple... not very complicated."
ummm they are not that simple.... unless you mean you want a ported sub? I wouldent suggest a horn for a first build.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok.
I agree a horn is not simple.
Can I do something with a subwoofer like this? AW3000 in the pdf file

55l box.? with our without vent?

Akasha
 

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I just want to inject this so theres less confusion. A "woofer" is a generic term for the type of driver it is, not at all necessarily what it plays. there are sub-woofers, mid-woofers, full range-woofers, and a few others i cant think of right now.
I agree with this statement, The term "woofer" is just simply the speaker or driver that plays sound with the exception of tweeters.
 

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These woofers don't make great subwoofers... I modeled them in my box building program and when its sealed the f3( -3db point) is at about 75 Hz and for a ported box that size the f3 on a 25 Hz tune is about 45 Hz. These drivers don't have enough excursion to be good subwoofers imo. 6.4mm is really small.
 

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"full range-woofers"? THERE's a contradiction in terms that I hadn't seen. 'Woofers' are drivers designed to reproduce bass frequencies. If a driver is 'full-range', itself an impossibility*, it's NOT a woofer.

* 'Tain't a driver around that will properly reproduce the full range of 20Hz - 20KHz, in my and many others' opinions. Certainly there are extended-range drivers, but they're not 'full', as they require, generally, tweeters for the top-2 octaves and have little output in the bottom octave. A normal bass/midrange driver will 'do' maybe-6 octaves (40Hz to 2.5KHz). An extended-range driver might add another octave into the treble and still sound pretty good.
 

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Woofers are bass drivers. Bass drivers are woofers. Both are designed to be good at reproducing the bass frequencies of music, defined, generally, as the bottom-3 octaves* from 20 - 160 Hz
Welllllll......maybe and maybe not. :bigsmile: A woofer with a Fs of 40hz won't be playing anything in the 20hz range. A subwoofer will though.
 

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This drivers looks really weird when I model it as well. It doesn't work out any better than the other one. I went and checked out the companies website and even their 400+ euro sub isn't very good for Home theatre use. What other brands are available to you?
 

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Quote:
Woofers are bass drivers. Bass drivers are woofers. Both are designed to be good at reproducing the bass frequencies of music, defined, generally, as the bottom-3 octaves* from 20 - 160 Hz
"Welllllll......maybe and maybe not. A woofer with a Fs of 40hz won't be playing anything in the 20hz range. A subwoofer will though."

Mike, I didn't write that all woofers have or must have energy into the bottom octave, I was defining the term 'bass', and I agree with your statement if you change the 'anything' to something like 'much at all'.

Back to the OP's question about definitions. The 3 drivers in a 3-way system are dedicated to bass, midrange, and treble. When multiway speakers became popular, the colloquial terms became woofer for the bass driver and tweeter for the treble driver. The term 'squawker' for the MR driver never became popular.

I still say that bass drivers are woofers, that woofers are bass drivers, and that subwoofer drivers are a subset of bass drivers/woofers. And I still don't like the term midbass as it tries to describe a bass/midrange driver...speaking of which...here's one that sounds incredibly good and is incredibly inexpensive at $10 each, Sonic Craft's 6-1/2" B/MR unit that I have christened the JG65 after its designer, Jeffrey Glowacki.


There are 16 in my OBLAs.

I subseqently used the four 12" woofers in these plus 4 more in the supersubwoofers pictured above. The good-looking, final versions of these will have 9, 10, or 11 JG65s in line plus, probably, a line of inexpensive tweeters alongside. I keep waffling on the number of drivers to use*--a dozen seems like overkill as the upper third or half will be WAY above my sitting position, but my ceiling slopes upward and away from the speakers...

...so a line of 'only' 9 would be a little short. They'll all wire in series/parallel OKly, with 9 back to the driver's 4 Ohms, 10 creating 10 Ohms, 11 creating 11 Ohms (wired in 6 and 5), and 12 back down to 5-1/3 Ohms. All of these are easily driven by the tubed SETs I have.

* I have LOTS of these and won't have to buy more no matter how many I put in my finished OBLAs.
 

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Mike, I didn't write that all woofers have or must have energy into the bottom octave, I was defining the term 'bass', and I agree with your statement if you change the 'anything' to something like 'much at all'.
Agreed. ""A woofer with a Fs of 40hz won't be playing 'much at all' in the 20hz range"" would have been a more accurate statement.
 

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Nice pics, but I can only see a woofer in one of the photos.......heh heh

Whilst we're at this, can someone explain to me the problem with ported subwoofers with a signal lower than the port frequency, and how it can damage the driver.

I understand that the driver 'unloads' and can go into uncontrolled motion with hopefully only unpleasant noises being the result, nothing worse we hope. So that is not my question.

If, as we have kinda concluded here that woofer/subwoofer is down to different meanings and definitions only, then equally we cannot go below the port frequency with either a woofer or subwoofer.

OK then, go into any store around and look at some of the speakers available. The chances are that quite a few of the models. either 'full range' floorstanders or bookshelves or what have you, will be ported designs. And further to that, the overwhelming vast majority of people that buy them will do NO sort of signal filtering when using them. In other words, all of these ported woofers will be exposed to many frequencies below that of the port frequency, and with presumably no ill effects. (manufacturers would not continue to build a type of speaker that was continually being repaired under warranty etc etc)

If the above is true, then why when looking at ported designs for subwoofers are we always being warned about the risks of driving them below the port frequency, and often see discussions on how to combat that, usually high pass filters.

I'm probably missing some little obvious thing, can someone point it out please?
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
google search rythmikaudio
Servo control is another option and easy in the right size box you build. Excuse my jump into all the help. Taskmaster
 

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I'm probably missing some little obvious thing, can someone point it out please?
Below the box Fb the port radiation is out of phase, response drops like a stone, encouraging you to turn it up, while excursion goes off the charts, and driver destruction results. The simple cure is not to send signals below Fb to the cab, and that's the purpose of a high pass filter. In a typical x.1 system high passing the L/R/C signal is accomplished by the receiver. When excursion is excessive there is a warning signal, ie., distortion. Those who choose not to turn it down when it sounds bad get blown drivers, but it's not like they weren't warned. :huh:
 
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