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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have my THX certified Panasonic plasma(not ISF calibrated) adjusted correctly using the TV's user controls and the Spears and Munsil test disc.When I put in the WALL E Blu-ray and go into the video calibration section offered on the disc,my contrast setting is the only setting that is incorrect,according to the disc,and I have to use the Oppo players contrast adjustment and set it to +3 to get it to the right setting.When I do that everything is set correctly according to the Disney disc calibration.

Now,when I'm done watching the movie should I return the setting back to where I had it correctly adjusted before or should I leave it and that be the correct setting to use from now on?

Are these included calibration tests just for adjusting to the individual movie or are they meant to be used as an overall calibration?
 

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Hmmm... why should any individual disk require a different calibration than any other?
 

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Hmmm... why should any individual disk require a different calibration than any other?
If you study the history of the THX Digital Mastering Program you will find that it specified a series of reference test signals be included with the video program throughout its mastering process. These test signals would serve as a reference for grading and encoding technicians working on the program. This began back in the days of laserdisc and VHS, and continues through to today. The engineers or technicians are still responsible to make the program look the way the program producer desires. Sometimes there may be slight variations in a given program incorporated to suit the people working on the project. In theory, it's best at the consumer end to readjust picture settings for a given THX Certified program using the test signals included on the encoded medium.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you study the history of the THX Digital Mastering Program you will find that it specified a series of reference test signals be included with the video program throughout its mastering process. These test signals would serve as a reference for grading and encoding technicians working on the program. This began back in the days of laserdisc and VHS, and continues through to today. The engineers or technicians are still responsible to make the program look the way the program producer desires. Sometimes there may be slight variations in a given program incorporated to suit the people working on the project. In theory, it's best at the consumer end to readjust picture settings for a given THX Certified program using the test signals included on the encoded medium.
So that being said,then I should adjust my settings per the disc if it includes it's own test signals and then use my normal calibration settings on all the others that don't include their own calibration set.

Thanks guys:T
 

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So, you're saying the THX Optimizer found on various discs are different?
 

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So, you're saying the THX Optimizer found on various discs are different?
It's my understanding that there may be subtle variations from one program to another and the test signals that accompany the program would reflect such variations. These test patterns accompany the program throughout every step in its mastering and the manufacture of the optical disc. As you may know, THX Ltd. is very protective of their intellectual property. They don't publish their methodologies in detail. Only participants in their certification programs are privy to more details, and they are bound by non-disclosure agreements.
 

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I think the THX Optimizer is not the best way to calibrate a system or display, Your much better off using Avia or Digital video essentials. I always find that after using the THX Optimizer any dark scenes are too dark and its tough to see anything going on in the shadows. Using DVE or Avia I find I get much better results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think the THX Optimizer is not the best way to calibrate a system or display, Your much better off using Avia or Digital video essentials. I always find that after using the THX Optimizer any dark scenes are too dark and its tough to see anything going on in the shadows. Using DVE or Avia I find I get much better results.
When I had my previous TV and had it calibrated with the older DVE and then would look at the THX optomizer on the DVD's that I owned, I always had to adjust the brightness/black level up to get it correct.

With the THX certified panasonic,right out of the box without any adjustment to the THX mode, it was correct looking at the THX optimizer,but now that I have calibrated the THX picture mode with the Spears and Munsil disc I doubt that that would be the case without having to readjust the brightness level.I'll have to check and see.
 

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It's my understanding that there may be subtle variations from one program to another and the test signals that accompany the program would reflect such variations. These test patterns accompany the program throughout every step in its mastering and the manufacture of the optical disc. As you may know, THX Ltd. is very protective of their intellectual property. They don't publish their methodologies in detail. Only participants in their certification programs are privy to more details, and they are bound by non-disclosure agreements.
Strangely enough, I'm a graduate of their certification programs and don't remember hearing this detail. Admittedly, I might have missed this part, as I was very green when I went through and could only soak up so much at one time.
I think the THX Optimizer is not the best way to calibrate a system or display, Your much better off using Avia or Digital video essentials. I always find that after using the THX Optimizer any dark scenes are too dark and its tough to see anything going on in the shadows. Using DVE or Avia I find I get much better results.
I too prefer DVE over the THX Optimizer, but mainly for ease of use and the myriad of additional patterns beyond the basic 5 controls. I also attributed the darkness in scenes after calibrating with the Optimizer to indicate my gamma was not ideal. At the time, I was working on a CRT and didn't have sufficient knowledge of the service menu items to mess with the gamma. I also have never been a big fan of the DVD player I was using at the time, and thanks to the TV design had to reach compromise settings between calibrating to the DVD player and making broadcast (cable) watchable.
 
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