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Discussion Starter #21
I feel like a **** fool right now. I'm at joAnn'e blowing on fabric. There's not too many options besides burlap and see-thru fabric that can pass the blow test. I want something beter looking than burlap and is in a reddish burgundy color.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
chanille Nhan, it's what we ended up with on my tube traps...it will pass your er "blow test" ..... :wtf:
Hey, I was advised to do so (blow test).

But isn't your tubes wrapped in some kind of plasticky material below the chenille? I'll have to look into getting some... I'l stop by JoAnn's again and ask :p
 

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I feel like a **** fool right now. I'm at joAnn'e blowing on fabric. There's not too many options besides burlap and see-thru fabric that can pass the blow test. I want something beter looking than burlap and is in a reddish burgundy color.
Funny stuff - now get to work.
 

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Dazian fabric makes a nice looking acoustic cloth called Expo and it's one third the cost of GOM. I did my theater in Black and Deep Burgundy and I'm happy with it. Another thing that is important is that it's fire retardent and fire rated.

Nhan, I'll bring over some of my Dazian Expo leftovers on Saturday when I come by.


Mike

Website for Dazian but I see that Expo is being discontinued:
http://www.dazian.com/cgi-bin/page.pl?action=show_style&style_id=417&group_id=

they probably have a replacement if you call them.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Dazian fabric makes a nice looking acoustic cloth called Expo and it's one third the cost of GOM. I did my theater in Black and Deep Burgundy and I'm happy with it. Another thing that is important is that it's fire retardent and fire rated.

Nhan, I'll bring over some of my Dazian Expo leftovers on Saturday when I come by.


Mike

Website for Dazian but I see that Expo is being discontinued:
http://www.dazian.com/cgi-bin/page.pl?action=show_style&style_id=417&group_id=

they probably have a replacement if you call them.
Thanks, Mike. I look forward to it.
 

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Hey, I was advised to do so (blow test).

But isn't your tubes wrapped in some kind of plasticky material below the chenille? I'll have to look into getting some... I'l stop by JoAnn's again and ask :p
There is aluminum paper on half the tube so I can choose reflective or not, and then a layer of normal window screen underneath the chenille...
 

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Part One

Nhan,

I have returned from my fun great DIY adventures with Mfeust (Mark). The visit with Mark and Cindy was very enjoyable. We made the panels, dialed in his 2ch system, audition the Neo 2x's in his home, listend to some great music, eat some fantastic meals, drank some awesome wines and had thoroughly chilled out time. My wife and I always appreciate the five star hospitality bestowed on us whenever we are at Casa da Feustal.

I tried something new this time. Instead of wrapping and gluing the batting entirely around the panel, we just glued it to the front and back surfaces. The excess material was tucked easily and neatly between the inside frame and panel using a 8" plaster tape blade. It went pretty quickly. So Nhan, even if you have your fames built you can still use the batting material. The total cost of making the six panels - ridgid fiberglass, batting, wood - came in just under $130. My labor cost - priceless, if I say so myself. :trumpet: :biglaugh:

The final sleeves have yet to be determined but I am sure it will be fantastic.

Here are some promised pictures of the build out. In the next post, I will show you pictures of what Mark and his wife are planning for at least one and possibly two additional panels.











More to come,
Lou
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Looks like you had a great time, Lou! Thanks for the advice and pics.

I have a horizontal support member in each panel. I will probably remove it, since it's pretty sturdy after I reinforced the corners with steel brackets. It'll make working with the insulation and batting much easier. Thanks for the suggestion on just gluing it to the back and front of the insulation.

Also, I thought about your idea of suspending it from the wall. I bought an aluminum pipe (instead of the suggested water pipes) to work with. What did you use to attach those to the frame and wall? I bought some 6-inch wood screws and then enclosing those screws with the aluminum cylinder for visual purpose (copper pipes would work, too, and are inexpensive, but they are more prone to oxidation). Maybe if you can share your method, I won't have to reinvent the wheel :D
 

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Part Two

Now on to the next part of the journey - final fabric sleeves.

Mark is married to a wonder and creative artist. Go here to see what I am talking about [url=http://feustelfinearts.com/murals.html/]LINK[/URL]

They are thinking about using Japanese Shibori hand dyed fabric to cover 1-3 of the panels. Here are some examples of what can be done. The first one is one by an artist friend of Mark and Cindy -











As you can see, the possibilities are endless. This dying process can be performed on silk, cotton and some wools. Mark will submit pictures of the finished product when they are completed.

I hope the information supplied is in some way helpful to all you DIYer and remember to have fun while you are doing the project. :thumbsup:

Lou
 

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Looks like you had a great time, Lou! Thanks for the advice and pics.

I have a horizontal support member in each panel. I will probably remove it, since it's pretty sturdy after I reinforced the corners with steel brackets. It'll make working with the insulation and batting much easier. Thanks for the suggestion on just gluing it to the back and front of the insulation.

Also, I thought about your idea of suspending it from the wall. I bought an aluminum pipe (instead of the suggested water pipes) to work with. What did you use to attach those to the frame and wall? I bought some 6-inch wood screws and then enclosing those screws with the aluminum cylinder for visual purpose (copper pipes would work, too, and are inexpensive, but they are more prone to oxidation). Maybe if you can share your method, I won't have to reinvent the wheel :D
Nhan,

You are welcome. Yes, it was a great time.

First, sorry for any confussion on my part. The idea of making the framed panel using 2" fiberglass look like it is floating off the wall (thereby providing necessary air space behind the panel) was achieved by the charcoal colored open celled rigid foam tube insulation used around water pipes. It comes in various ID sizes and has a slit running down the entir length of the tubes. I used 3/4" ID in one application and 1" in another.

The foam tubes don't look like they will support much force but since the hanging process force is trying to compress them length wise, they are vey strong. Cut about a 4" pieces off and use double sided foam tape to tape one near each corner in back of the panel. Depending on where the panels are hung and WAF and if they can be seen, you can paint them the same color as your walls or whatever.

Peace and later,
Lou
 

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The panels turned out great. Thanks Lou for all your help. Three of the panels will be finished in material that matches the wall color and will be hung on the wall. The other three panels will be free standing and moved around the room into different locations where needed and will be covered in some decorative material like Lou pictured above. I will be adding pictures of the finished panels as they get covered in material.

It was our pleasure having Lou and Gina for a few days building, listening, eating and drinking, not always in that order.

PS Lou Misty says woof woof.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Almost done...Just need to find the right fabric to cover these babies up! I bought some Johns Manville 1" insulation from LoudAndClear. The frame was thick enough for only 3 layers of this stuff only (and 2 layers of the white batting used to cover the insulation). I just placed them behind the LS6s to test out in the mean time. Definitely cleaned up some of the mids. I'll still have to try out a different amp to try and tame the high frequencies at louder volumes.

So far so good. Thanks to everyone for their help in this matter.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Looking good Nhan!
Thanks, Chad. I mocked hung them (still no fabric wrapping yet) using some pretty cool flushed picture frame tools I found at Lowes. They look really good against the wall. I gave up the idea of trying to space them out from the wall, as there is really not enough space for the speakers in the first place. I'll take some pics this coming Sunday when I get the custom bases installed on my LS6s.
 
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