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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As I mentioned in a previous post, I have been gone and out of the scene for a very long time. I was surprised though to see the lack of posts and threads here now. I would have thought with COVID and people staying at home that more people would be looking at DIY methods if for no other reason than something to do!

Years ago I kinda predicted that with the new super big High Def TVs available now, that projector setups would start dying off and things would go back to projectors being used for dedicated theater rooms. Truth is, with 80", 82", 85" and larger 4K sets that are available now at insanely low prices (I remember paying $2400 for a Sony 55" rear projection TV back in the day!), well the images that these sets produce often even the playing field over having a HUGE projector screen that has too many restrictions and variables that can compromise the image quality. It is very realistic to score an 80" plus size 4K set cheaper than the cost of a good 4K projector and screen. Of course DIY screens help offset the price a bit... okay significantly... but it still can cost as much or more for a projector. So why do it?

As the saying goes- 'Go big or go home!' There is just something about watching the latest movie on a big screen with some popcorn and the right sound system. That's why I am going to be setting up my home theater system again. I have a 75" 4K TCL that has an absolutely incredible picture, but I still like watching movies on a big screen. Plus with HBO Max now starting to show new release movies the same day they are released in the theaters, well movie night once again has me excited! I'm also going to be setting up a portable outdoor theater and screen. So yeah, I'm thinking I'm back!

I see that some people have posted saying there doesn't seem to be any experts chiming in anymore. Don... Harpmaker did sadly pass away a few years back. He was a great guy and is missed very much. Don and Mechman were my cohorts in crime so to speak, and when I disappeared they kept going with the testing methods I was always preaching about, and I see they were even working on some new DIY screen paints as well.

I'll end this lengthy re-introduction post with this- For anyone interested in DIY screens, I'd say this thread is the absolute best place to start. Most if not all of your questions will be answered from the indexed items and you'll learn more about CIE, D65 neutrals and color science than you wanted to! Don't let that scare you off though, all that testing was to prove the theories and back up what we were saying. Here's the link
 
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Discussion Starter #2
I was just telling this to someone else and thought it might be good to post it here too.
Here's the cold hard truth about projectors and screens...

Years ago older projectors were a bit under powered lumen wise and could be temperamental as far as calibrating, placement, and they definitely did not like ambient light at all. Truth is now days modern projectors have come a long way and the lumen output on some is like staring into the Sun! (Don't do it with any projector!) These modern projectors can compensate for a wide variety of screens and lighting conditions. As long as the material or paint you choose isn't WAY off and produces a horrible color shift, most projectors can be calibrated and compensate for it.

So with that said, this really isn't that hard. I'd say proper prep and then full calibration of your projector will yield more positive results than the DIY screen paint being used. There I said it! It really isn't that hard. OTS neutral grays are still the easiest and a great way to go (my bet is a lot of the ones tested back in the day either don't exist anymore or have different paint formulas now :( ). There are still a ton of good options out there. I once made a screen in a room that had no ambient light issues and just used Kilz primer and the projected image looked fantastic! I've seen people spend MONTHS trying to decide which DIY method to go with. Just get off your duff and grab some good paint and do it! It's WAY more fun watching movies and sports than wading through endless posts and threads... and yeah the flame wars that happens at some places (HTS has always been able to keep that under control though from my recollection).

What are you waiting for? Go make your screen and start having fun!
 
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We did it! Made our original screen, 155" diagonal, in 2006. It was a mix of Behr Silver Screen and White Opal Pearl. Our first projector was good, but needed some help in blacks. So the Silver Screen was great.

Fast forward to 18 months ago, when we bought a new projector, (Epson 5050UB) 4K this time with excellent blacks and dark level detail. Now my Silver Screen made everyone's face look dirty.

With some new OTS paint, we have a new screen that is killer awesome! The whites are white, and the blacks are black. And skin tones are natural now, not dirty like before.

Yes, a dedicated theater.
 

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No matter how big flat panels get there is 1 BIG item that they will most likely never have...acoustically transparent screens. Now some will say that new flat panels are coming with speakers in the screen, but the downside is you are not getting the quality of sound you can get with regular speakers.
 

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No matter how big flat panels get there is 1 BIG item that they will most likely never have...acoustically transparent screens. Now some will say that new flat panels are coming with speakers in the screen, but the downside is you are not getting the quality of sound you can get with regular speakers.
No matter how flat panel TV's progress, it is doubtful they would ever be as good as a front projector with a good screen.

Will there ever be a 155" or a 200" flat panel TV? Maybe. But I would still take a state-of-the-art 4K front projector instead. This requires a dedicated theater room, which some might not find practical.
 

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Projection is dying off... it's just in the early stages while waiting for more and better flat panel offerings. There's also the problem of cost. The switch to digital projection was facilitated by studios subsidizing the cost of replacing film projectors with digital projectors because NOT using film saved the studios so much money that they realized they would make more money by helping theaters replace film projectors. There's not a huge cost saving by switching digital projection to an LED wall for the studios, so they aren't likely to want to get into affordable financing or leasing. But there are already TVs being sold to consumers that will produce over 3000 nits (like 800 fL) that cost $1500 or even less. Projected images in theaters cannot be brighter than about 100 fL (340-ish nits). At home, those very high brightness capable TVs produce all the colors available in the UHD spec. While the projected images in the movie theater can't do all the high saturation colors because there's just not enough light in the pixels to create those colors on the screen. To compete with what is possible with home video on "popularly priced" TVs, cinema has to change to LED walls. It is already starting. But many more products coming, and the cost of these different solutions will come down quickly, as with consumer video tech.
 

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I don't think front projection is dying. It offers the best and largest picture, in 4K or even 8K, at a less expensive price.

Are there any 200" flat panel displays? I have not seen one. Yes, 65" and 75-85" TV's are the rage now, and getting crazy cheap.

But for a family who wants a real "theater" experience, with a huge screen, projection is the way to go.

 

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Sorry, but anybody who thinks ANY projector can make a UHD/4K movie in HDR look REMOTELY as good as they look on a mid-range flat-panel TV is simply not paying attention or doesn't understand what they are looking at. It requires HIGH HIGH HIGH luminance to produce the colors in the expanded DCI/P3/D6500 color space used in consumer UHD video. The $60,000 Sony projector has multiple blue lasers (probably 30 to 60 of them) aimed at a spinning yellow phosphor disc couldn't produce 100% white levels beyond about 200 fL on a 1.0 gain projection screen only 82 inches wide. If the $60k Sony projector is replaced with a typical $2000 projector, the maximum peak white value on the same 1.0 gain screen 82 inches wide (something close to 90 inches diagonal), the peak white level drops to less than 70 fL, less than 1/10th of the light of a $1200 Vizio TV that produces 875 fL for peak white. Guess which video display has the larger color gamut? A projector has filters and multiple glass or plastic lens elements between the imagers and the screen. The flat screen TV has some thin-film layers between you and the pixels... guess which one is cleaner/sharper? Not the projector. I have a $35,000 projector here right now and I could fire it up any time. Instead, I ALWAYS choose one of the 65-inch TVs. And a BIG picture is meaningless. You really mean viewing angle. A 65-inch TV and a 120-inch wide projection screen with the SAME VIEWING ANGLE will produce absolutely ZERO votes for the projector, even if it costs $60,000. Expecting a $2000 projector and a $500 screen to look better than a $2500 65-inch OLED TV is wildly overly optimistic. A $2000 projector cannot compete with ANY mid-range flat panel TV in terms of clarity of images, quaity of motion, black level, peak white level or even larger screen size. Way too many people think they can use a 120-inch screen with a $2000 projector... and you can, but it is going to be pathetically dim. If you try to make the projected images brighter with a screen with gain, you run into problems with hot spotting (the ball of mosquitos in the center of your field of view). Also, the cheapest REAL UHD projector you can get right now is around $5000. FAR more expensive than the $1200 Vizio (this refers to the "on sale" price of the 65-inch Vizio PQX LCD TV). If the LCD screen doesn't look as sharp as you'd like, OLED TVs have incredible pin-point accurate images, even in UHD TVs, let alone 8K TVs. Self illuminating displays remove SO MANY THINGS that compromise image quality. 95% of the projectors that advertise "UHD" still have HD imagers with 1920x1080 resolution. They have to flash each frame 4 times with different pixels each time in order to display every pixel in a UHD image but EVEN THEN, each pixel is 4 times larger than each pixel in the original image. So you end up with a situation where you get big blobby pixels that do not exist on TVs. Again, to even see all the pixels in UHD images with a projector, right now, you have to spend $5000 or more on a projector. Anything less and you have NEVER seen how good UHD HDR images can be on a mid-range or high-end TV. If you think you will solve a lot of problems with a DLP projector... think again. DLP chips haven't produced improved black levels since around 2010. DLP tech is now about 10 years behind LCD/LCoS in terms of black levels in projectors. And even inexpensive flat-panel TVs produce blacks that are darker than DLP projector black levels even for brand new DLP devices. Rainbows and motion artifacts are pretty much non-issues for DLP now, but the black levels of DLP projectors still suck. Sure, you can reduce black levels by making the images dimmer... but that will dim peak white also which defeats the whole purpose of the improvements we get with UHD video.
 

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When there is a 200" screen available in a flat panel QLED TV, at a reasonable price, let me know.
Until then, front projection is the way to go for those who seek the real theater experience.
 

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When there is a 200" screen available in a flat panel QLED TV, at a reasonable price, let me know.
Until then, front projection is the way to go for those who seek the real theater experience.
Imagine trying to carry a screen that big ....110” tv is max size today and cost a fortune 🔮 ..
 

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I see the big size folks could care less about color gamut reproduction, real UHD resolution, viewing angle instead of screen size, or image brightness. Go ahead and have a great time looking at your 2 fL 200-inch screen that has a big ball of mad mosquitoes in the center of your field of vision.

Sony's $60,000 laser phosphor projector is too dim to produce compelling images on a 200 inch screen. A $1500 projector is going to be LUCKY to produce 2 or 3 fL on ANY 200 inch screen, even one with 2.0 gain and horrendous hot spotting. That's not even half as bright as the MINIMUM spec for standard definition projection. And when the projection lamp gets a couple thousand hours on it at the highest light output setting that you need to use because the screen is so large, you will only get 1 to 2 fL for 100% white on the same screen.

Everybody obsessed with large screen sizes to the point that they will accept images no better than "2" quality on a 1-to-10 scale should never advise anybody else about what they should or shouldn't use when a decent flat-panel TV with the same viewing angle will produce images in the 8.5 to 9.0 range for far less money. I'm talking about images that include 1080p AND 2160p content. New Benq projectors (all use DLP chips) look about the same as they did 10 years ago... flat panel TVs DO NOT, they are wildly better than flat panel TVs from 10 years ago. Today's LCD projectors are maybe 20% better than they were 10 years ago and there are NO full-UHD resolution LCD projectors yet. Forget pixel shift, the pixels are 4 times too large for pixel shift to produce real UHD resolution. The CHEAPEST real UHD projectors are $5000 and have LCoS imagers. And those $5000 UHD projectors are **** on a 200 inch screen because the images are so dim, 200 inches is WAY too big. Hell, for the light output of those $5000 UHD projectors, 100-inches is too large of a screen. So shove your "big screen over everything else" sentiments into the closet and shut the door. It's embarrassing.

In audio there's a saying "No highs, no lows, Must be Bose." In video images it's "Take your video images back 20 years with a $1500 projector and a 200 inch screen!" I have a $30,000+ laser phosphor projector here and an $8000 motorized masking screen with remote control and programmability (required for "work"). I also have 3 flat screen TVs in the room (only a place to use one of them at a time, currently 2 LCDs and an OLED, all less than 18 months old priced from $999 to $2499. For the last 12 months, the projector has never been used. I sit 6.5 feet from a 65-inch diagonal TV when I use the system alone. This produces a wide viewing angle that give the same "feeling" to the size of the images as a much larger screen viewed from 10 feet or more. On that same 1-10 scale for video image quality, I would give that laser-phosphor projector and acoustically transparent 90-inch projection screen about a 7.7 for its image quality. Putting the same images onto the same projection screen material but 200 inches wide instead of 90-inches, and the image quality score drops to maybe 5.5 or so. ANY/EVERY projector loses image quality as the screen gets too big for the light capabilities of the projector.
 

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I see the big size folks could care less about color gamut reproduction, real UHD resolution, viewing angle instead of screen size, or image brightness. Go ahead and have a great time looking at your 2 fL 200-inch screen that has a big ball of mad mosquitoes in the center of your field of vision.

Sony's $60,000 laser phosphor projector is too dim to produce compelling images on a 200 inch screen. A $1500 projector is going to be LUCKY to produce 2 or 3 fL on ANY 200 inch screen, even one with 2.0 gain and horrendous hot spotting. That's not even half as bright as the MINIMUM spec for standard definition projection. And when the projection lamp gets a couple thousand hours on it at the highest light output setting that you need to use because the screen is so large, you will only get 1 to 2 fL for 100% white on the same screen.

Everybody obsessed with large screen sizes to the point that they will accept images no better than "2" quality on a 1-to-10 scale should never advise anybody else about what they should or shouldn't use when a decent flat-panel TV with the same viewing angle will produce images in the 8.5 to 9.0 range for far less money. I'm talking about images that include 1080p AND 2160p content. New Benq projectors (all use DLP chips) look about the same as they did 10 years ago... flat panel TVs DO NOT, they are wildly better than flat panel TVs from 10 years ago. Today's LCD projectors are maybe 20% better than they were 10 years ago and there are NO full-UHD resolution LCD projectors yet. Forget pixel shift, the pixels are 4 times too large for pixel shift to produce real UHD resolution. The CHEAPEST real UHD projectors are $5000 and have LCoS imagers. And those $5000 UHD projectors are **** on a 200 inch screen because the images are so dim, 200 inches is WAY too big. Hell, for the light output of those $5000 UHD projectors, 100-inches is too large of a screen. So shove your "big screen over everything else" sentiments into the closet and shut the door. It's embarrassing.

In audio there's a saying "No highs, no lows, Must be Bose." In video images it's "Take your video images back 20 years with a $1500 projector and a 200 inch screen!" I have a $30,000+ laser phosphor projector here and an $8000 motorized masking screen with remote control and programmability (required for "work"). I also have 3 flat screen TVs in the room (only a place to use one of them at a time, currently 2 LCDs and an OLED, all less than 18 months old priced from $999 to $2499. For the last 12 months, the projector has never been used. I sit 6.5 feet from a 65-inch diagonal TV when I use the system alone. This produces a wide viewing angle that give the same "feeling" to the size of the images as a much larger screen viewed from 10 feet or more. On that same 1-10 scale for video image quality, I would give that laser-phosphor projector and acoustically transparent 90-inch projection screen about a 7.7 for its image quality. Putting the same images onto the same projection screen material but 200 inches wide instead of 90-inches, and the image quality score drops to maybe 5.5 or so. ANY/EVERY projector loses image quality as the screen gets too big for the light capabilities of the projector.
Look at the images I posted. Then decide if those are a "2" rating. Trust me, size does matter. My screen is 155" diagonal. Our Epson 5050UB easily does 2600 Lumens, and 30.5 ftL. We watched the Super Bowl, and the images were nothing short of "breath taking". Viewing angle? There is not a bad seat in our theater, with seating for up to 14 people, in three rows, each on risers.
We care about a true, film like presentation.

 

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There is one Big thing that needs to be done before a flat panel will ever compete with a projector... Acoustically Transparent FP. Until this is done it will never give the same experience as a projector, as the sound needs to come from the screen. Hqving speakersbuilt in to the tv will NEVER compete with good speaker drivers. I believe it is possible to do, by having a small hole next to each LED, and placing all the electronics in a separate box like Samsung does already on some of their FPs. By doing this they can have enough holes to compete with any screen.
 

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There was a time in many boy's teenager / college years when having a car with shiny wheels, big tires, loud / no muffler and jacked up in the back was important. These cars were NOT efficient, not the fastest or best handling as many just slapped on parts. But they made a statement - "I am enjoying life in this way right now" and "they get me girls"...

Da Wiz seems to be committed to using the best technical equipment and this fills his satisfaction and he enjoys his life in this way.

I too like to have high quality toys, but along with some of these I have additional requirements. For HT, I wanted what they had everytime I went to the movies. BIG!!! To get this part of life satisfied, I need to for-go some technical perfections in lieu of BIG. As great as tv screens are, in my case, they simply cannot be big enough for the extra movie-going experience I would like to have.

So, for my current life-enjoying entertainment, I have weighed out my wants, end goals and spending level (as this is always a factor) to come up with a solution. I currently have an epson 5050ub projector (many hours spent tweaking), 106" screen, pioneer 7.2 stereo along with as many diy speakers. This does a great job of filling my time and others' time with quality entertainment.

In the end, after researching and garnering advice, it comes down to what will an individual be satisfied with the most. Each person can try their best to influence another, but the one in the end needs to be happy with their decisions. This forum is great for info and chocked full of experience and advice. We can all offer our advice to an OP while not insisting everyone else is wrong and that the OP will making a regrettable mistake by listening to the majority. We should try our best to politely answer the OP's question and allow that person to make the final decision that they will be living with.
 

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Yes, in the end each user must decide. Lot's of options to consider. When we built our house, a dedicated home theater was the "must have" ticket.
It's a matter of budget, practicality, and need.
What works for me might not work for you.
Your money, your choice.
Plenty of good advice here, and elsewhere.
 

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I see the big size folks could care less about color gamut reproduction, real UHD resolution, viewing angle instead of screen size, or image brightness. Go ahead and have a great time looking at your 2 fL 200-inch screen that has a big ball of mad mosquitoes in the center of your field of vision.

Sony's $60,000 laser phosphor projector is too dim to produce compelling images on a 200 inch screen. A $1500 projector is going to be LUCKY to produce 2 or 3 fL on ANY 200 inch screen, even one with 2.0 gain and horrendous hot spotting. That's not even half as bright as the MINIMUM spec for standard definition projection. And when the projection lamp gets a couple thousand hours on it at the highest light output setting that you need to use because the screen is so large, you will only get 1 to 2 fL for 100% white on the same screen.

Everybody obsessed with large screen sizes to the point that they will accept images no better than "2" quality on a 1-to-10 scale should never advise anybody else about what they should or shouldn't use when a decent flat-panel TV with the same viewing angle will produce images in the 8.5 to 9.0 range for far less money. I'm talking about images that include 1080p AND 2160p content. New Benq projectors (all use DLP chips) look about the same as they did 10 years ago... flat panel TVs DO NOT, they are wildly better than flat panel TVs from 10 years ago. Today's LCD projectors are maybe 20% better than they were 10 years ago and there are NO full-UHD resolution LCD projectors yet. Forget pixel shift, the pixels are 4 times too large for pixel shift to produce real UHD resolution. The CHEAPEST real UHD projectors are $5000 and have LCoS imagers. And those $5000 UHD projectors are **** on a 200 inch screen because the images are so dim, 200 inches is WAY too big. Hell, for the light output of those $5000 UHD projectors, 100-inches is too large of a screen. So shove your "big screen over everything else" sentiments into the closet and shut the door. It's embarrassing.

In audio there's a saying "No highs, no lows, Must be Bose." In video images it's "Take your video images back 20 years with a $1500 projector and a 200 inch screen!" I have a $30,000+ laser phosphor projector here and an $8000 motorized masking screen with remote control and programmability (required for "work"). I also have 3 flat screen TVs in the room (only a place to use one of them at a time, currently 2 LCDs and an OLED, all less than 18 months old priced from $999 to $2499. For the last 12 months, the projector has never been used. I sit 6.5 feet from a 65-inch diagonal TV when I use the system alone. This produces a wide viewing angle that give the same "feeling" to the size of the images as a much larger screen viewed from 10 feet or more. On that same 1-10 scale for video image quality, I would give that laser-phosphor projector and acoustically transparent 90-inch projection screen about a 7.7 for its image quality. Putting the same images onto the same projection screen material but 200 inches wide instead of 90-inches, and the image quality score drops to maybe 5.5 or so. ANY/EVERY projector loses image quality as the screen gets too big for the light capabilities of the projector.

Da Whiz, your post seemed (to me) to be rather upsetting that you feel some people may take you for a liar or are purposefully leading the OP astray. If I read your message incorrectly and I apologize. If I am correct, don't be upset that others do not feel the same as you, nor do you need to feel the urge to talk down someone else's personal beliefs. Others should not act the same towards yours. I get everything that you said, it is logical and makes sense.....however, I LOVE the movie theater experience of being able to not leave the house and be able to watch what I want, how I want. I, like you, my friend, have numerous flat panel TVs (and large ones) and the quality of those are much better than my new EPSON 6050UB, but to me, nothing takes the place of a movie theater atmosphere. That is why I have it.....it is just something about being able to pick a seat within my theater room and just be in awe with the rumbling of my Klipsch 7.2.2 system. My family enjoys it, I enjoy it, my friends enjoy it......it is time that we spend together with just family or have friends over and make memories that we will never forget. Whatever your love is, hold onto it, cherish it, and remember it; for when our told here on Earth is done....we take none of it with us, not even the memories.

Peace to all.

Russ
 

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"Perfect is the enemy of good"

These guys right here...exactly my thoughts. One can spend countless hours researching, testing and spending money to acquire and assemble the perfect HT (or anything for that matter). For those that choose to, I would never criticize them for wanting to do so. But IMO, at some point the additional time and money spent does not produce a substantially better experience.

I love our dedicated HT w/our big 106" screen and booming 7.2 speakers. I love it, my wife loves it, our kids love it, our grandkids love it and our friends love it. The beauty of none of us having perfect ears or eyes is that no one using our HT has ever said "It's nice, but it could be better." They just ask for more popcorn.

For HT, I wanted what they had everytime I went to the movies. BIG!!! To get this part of life satisfied, I need to for-go some technical perfections in lieu of BIG. As great as tv screens are, in my case, they simply cannot be big enough for the extra movie-going experience I would like to have.

So, for my current life-enjoying entertainment, I have weighed out my wants, end goals and spending level (as this is always a factor) to come up with a solution. I currently have an epson 5050ub projector (many hours spent tweaking), 106" screen, pioneer 7.2 stereo along with as many diy speakers. This does a great job of filling my time and others' time with quality entertainment.

In the end, after researching and garnering advice, it comes down to what will an individual be satisfied with the most.
.....however, I LOVE the movie theater experience of being able to not leave the house and be able to watch what I want, how I want. I, like you, my friend, have numerous flat panel TVs (and large ones) and the quality of those are much better than my new EPSON 6050UB, but to me, nothing takes the place of a movie theater atmosphere. That is why I have it.....it is just something about being able to pick a seat within my theater room and just be in awe with the rumbling of my Klipsch 7.2.2 system. My family enjoys it, I enjoy it, my friends enjoy it......it is time that we spend together with just family or have friends over and make memories that we will never forget. Whatever your love is, hold onto it, cherish it, and remember it; for when our told here on Earth is done....we take none of it with us, not even the memories.
 

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Da Whiz, your post seemed (to me) to be rather upsetting that you feel some people may take you for a liar or are purposefully leading the OP astray. If I read your message incorrectly and I apologize. If I am correct, don't be upset that others do not feel the same as you, nor do you need to feel the urge to talk down someone else's personal beliefs. Others should not act the same towards yours. I get everything that you said, it is logical and makes sense.....however, I LOVE the movie theater experience of being able to not leave the house and be able to watch what I want, how I want. I, like you, my friend, have numerous flat panel TVs (and large ones) and the quality of those are much better than my new EPSON 6050UB, but to me, nothing takes the place of a movie theater atmosphere. That is why I have it.....it is just something about being able to pick a seat within my theater room and just be in awe with the rumbling of my Klipsch 7.2.2 system. My family enjoys it, I enjoy it, my friends enjoy it......it is time that we spend together with just family or have friends over and make memories that we will never forget. Whatever your love is, hold onto it, cherish it, and remember it; for when our told here on Earth is done....we take none of it with us, not even the memories.

Peace to all.

Russ
I don't think I said cinemas would die... they will convert to LED walls with totally black blacks, bringing a new era of image quality in theaters that has never been as good... including presentations at 48 frames per second and faster while retaining images that are both brighter AND darker than any current film or digital projection equipment. And as these commercial size LED screens get into a price range where content providers and theaters can share in the cost of upgrading from projection, converting from projection will be a world wide change over a couple of decades.

Audio performance will evolve to something better than speakers behind the screen that has never been ideal for sound quality or video/film quality because of light lost through the perforations needed for acoustically transparent screens. Likely this new tech will evolve to LCR speakers both above and below the screen to allow vertical positioning of sounds as well as left-right positioning and perhaps with even more convincing additions of "height" speakers plus the normal surround speakers for an expanded aural dome of sound in a much larger space than is possible in most homes. Commercial cinema will have to adapt to be able to entice people out to see and hear something even better than a decent home theater can equal. If that happens, commercial cinema will continue for the foreseeable future,
 

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The Industry Players in the Audio Video realm are reacting to these criticisms.

Meyer Sound has been working on a two way system that reflects the high frequency sound off of the screen into the audience area, so that the screen can be higher output with blacker blacks.

 
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