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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My initial HT setup consisted of 2 Towers, a center speaker, a 12" sub, and 2 back surround speakers, all Klipsch reference series, that I bought 22 years ago. The sub crapped out recently and I replaced it with 2 Klipsch 12" subs. I also added 2 bookshelf speakers as surrounds. I bought ATMOS front height speakers which I can't use.
Anyway to get to my question, do the tower speakers deteriorate over a 22 year period, or do they age well? Or is that an old wives tale?
My hearing is going (I'm 68 and my favorite bands since the 60's were Cream and Hendrix. You do the math) so I'm not sure how good or bad they sound. Some movies sound spectacular but others sound kind of "sandy". Not sure if it's the actual soundtrack or not.
Anyway I hope I've entertained you all enough to respond to my question.
I'll include pics, if only to make my post more enjoyable. And, yes, you're not seeing things. It actually was 7:00 when I took these pictures!
Your Pal Duke
Property Furniture Interior design Wood Living room

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a 12 year old F30 speaker system which I am still happy with. The sound (especially dialog) is terrible on quite a few movies.
Yes, I agree! On "Ready Player One" the dialog is so clear you can hear Parcival even when he's whispering during the opening race. On the other hand I can barely understand Scarlett Johansson most of the time. Sometimes two guys will be talking, one guy is crystal clear and the other one is imperceptible. Music sounds great, so I guess the speakers are still kickass, it's movie audio, as you said, that's inconsistent. I wish I knew someone else with a home theater so I could compare. There's an Audio Advice type of store a few miles from me but they never answer their phone or respond to my emails, and you have to contact them before you can go over to their showroom.
 

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No loudspeakers get better with time. Once they are made, degradation begins in mechanical and electronic components... glues begin aging and failing, rubber/foam components begin degrading. Electronic components, primarily capacitors in speakers, begin degrading. It's a slow process, but everything that can degrade over time IS degrading over time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No loudspeakers get better with time. Once they are made, degradation begins in mechanical and electronic components... glues begin aging and failing, rubber/foam components begin degrading. Electronic components, primarily capacitors in speakers, begin degrading. It's a slow process, but everything that can degrade over time IS degrading over time.
Yikes, that's depressing. Well so far, so good with mine. Luckily I'm in position to replace them when the time comes. Thanks for the info.
 

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Hold on a minute. True, any components decay over time, a long for some, short time for others. Just had my 1990 Klipsch La scala's crossover's rebuilt and I couldn't be happier. Its my new Pioneer LX305 I'm having issues with. Where are you Pioneer?
Consider how even Klipsch from the 50's on are still sought after. They don't get better with age, they just always sound better. I'm the same age.
 

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Hold on a minute. True, any components decay over time, a long for some, short time for others. Just had my 1990 Klipsch La scala's crossover's rebuilt and I couldn't be happier. Its my new Pioneer LX305 I'm having issues with. Where are you Pioneer?
Consider how even Klipsch from the 50's on are still sought after. They don't get better with age, they just always sound better. I'm the same age.
Yay, I'm happy again! ;) Boy this thread is getting confusing :oops:
 

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@Da Wiz is correct, everything about a speaker degrades over time. It's akin to a car in that respect, the best it will ever be is when you drive it home for the first time. Items wear and deteriorate over time, it's the nature of the beast. And just like a car you can replace failed or underperforming components provided the parts are still available. Unless something is a classic - or has sentimental value - it may not be worth the expense though.
 

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Yay, I'm happy again! ;) Boy this thread is getting confusing :oops:
This thread is NOT confusing. No matter what ANYBODY says, speakers degrade slowly from the day you buy them. They NEVER "get better". And only the fringes of audio-hobbiests are interested in ANY 1950s or 1960s speakers and they don't listen to them without correcting any mechanical issues or electronic issues that are inevitable in un-maintained speakers from the 50s, 60s, 70s or later. These hobbyists replace capacitors, install better inductors than anything available 40+ years ago before air-core inductors were the gold standard for speaker crossovers. Even modern resistors are available that outperform any resistor from 40+ years ago. They replace pressed paper cones in drivers. They replace anything glued and anything plastic (because plastic gets brittle and delicate with age). They replace rubber or foam parts because they are likely falling apart after 40+ years. Speakers made before high quality crossover design software existed (very late 1980s) literally NEVER sound as good as modern speakers designed with crossover optimization software. Older speakers had much more OBVIOUS colorations than speakers made since crossover software matured into a reliable speaker design aid. You can improve old speaker designs substantially by remeasuring new drivers, and using good crossover design software to create a new crossover design. It's possible to eliminate huge amounts of distortion/coloration present since the speakers were originally designed. There is literally NOTHING "better" about older spreakers compared to newer speakers... as separate groups. Certainly, you can find **** new speakers and compare them to rebuilt vintage speakers to "prove a point" disingenuously. But I'm talking about more appropriate and balanced comparisons. The technology in newer speakers addresses problems they didn't even know existed 40+ years ago. Like many of the "better" speakers designed today have wire used in the voice coils that is square instead of round just to get more copper (and power handling) into the voice coil compared to round wire that has air gaps between wires (square wire fills all the air gaps in the modern wound voice coils). That's just 1 example of modern tech being better than ANY older-tech.
 
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