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I have a 15 year old Luxman 2.0 stereo receiver that I love for it's pure sound, but it's time to replace my speakers. Space is limited in my listening room, and I've decided upon a pair of JBL L830 bookshelf speakers and a JBL ES150P powered subwoofer.
Question: Do I have to replace my 2.0 receiver to drive a 2.1 speaker setup? The receiver has a speaker A/B switch. I need to know before I buy new speakers.
 

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It can be done, You need to buy a sub that has High level speaker inputs meaning that you have your speaker wire connected to the back of the sub and then from the sub to your speakers. Alot of the more pricey subs have this capability. You would then use the subs built in crossover and level controls to adjust the low output.
 

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I have a 15 year old Luxman 2.0 stereo receiver that I love for it's pure sound, but it's time to replace my speakers. Space is limited in my listening room, and I've decided upon a pair of JBL L830 bookshelf speakers and a JBL ES150P powered subwoofer.
Question: Do I have to replace my 2.0 receiver to drive a 2.1 speaker setup? The receiver has a speaker A/B switch. I need to know before I buy new speakers.
This is not an ideal sub for you. First, it has no speaker level inputs. Second, it has no network for rolling off the bass to your main speakers. As another posted, look for a sub with speaker level inputs and outputs.

Kal
 

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The ES150P sub looks like a modified-for-wireless version of the E150P I evaluated a few years ago. It's a poor excuse for a subwoofer (although admittedly it might be hard to find something better in the $250 price range).

As noted, you will need a sub with speaker level connections. That said, I think I would only use the inputs, not the outputs. Sure, running the speaker-level outputs back to the main speakers will roll out their bass, but I wouldn't want my main speakers loaded down with a passive crossover that could change their sonic characteristics. I'd run the main speakers full range, and then adjust the sub's crossover to pick up where their bass rolls out naturally. Filtering the bass to the main speakers is not nearly as important with a basic stereo set-up as it is for home theater.

Regards,
Wayne
 

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I'd run the main speakers full range, and then adjust the sub's crossover to pick up where their bass rolls out naturally. Filtering the bass to the main speakers is not nearly as important with a basic stereo set-up as it is for home theater.
I suppose it would also depend on your listening levels. If you run the speakers full range and you listen at medium to loud levels, you may drive the woofers into distortion. At that point the mid-range will suffer too since those speakers don't cross until 2500Hz. I'm not saying don't try it, but you might want a back-up plan too.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So, Wayne, let me get this straight.
You're suggesting a speaker A connection to the two stereo speakers, a speaker B connections to the subwoofer (left or right?), and run the receiver with A+B?
Scott
 
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