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You can't hear below 20hz but you can still surely feel it quite a bit. Why cut it when there are people with systems that can reproduce it? Does it hurt things too leave it in?
Having frequencies down that low can eat into your available headroom unnecessarily. Even though you can't hear them down that low, as you say you can feel them. But you can feel enough thump from bass frequencies higher than that without needing those below 20 Hz.
Generally I have a roll-off that starts at about 45 and cuts progressively harder the lower the frequencies are below that.
 

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I always thought 20-20,000 Hz was a bit too round a number to accurately describe human hearing. I think many more people can hear 16-16,000 Hz than can hear 20-20,000. For centuries before the invention of loudspeakers the lowest musical note was considered subcontra C (C0) which is 16.352 Hz - This is the 'bottom' of the musical scale because it was/is considered the lowest note that could be recognized/differentiated for the adjacent notes. subcontra D is 18.354 Hz and subcontra E is 20.6 Hz.

From a practical perspective, when dealing with a P.A. it may be more efficient to ignore those two notes since compositions that use them are rare and the cost in watts and excursion capability may be too high to accommodate... but 20Hz should not be a 'hard line' because they are legitimate musical notes. Sometimes 16Hz could be a better cutoff. A Church or concert hall that wishes to replace a pipe organ with a P.A. and subwoofers should at least consider this and see if there is a way to make it work.
 

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There isn't really a "hard edge" in audio frequency range, if you look at the curves on a Fletcher-Munson graph, you'll see that we just get less and less sensitive to frequencies at the extremes.

Ok the drop-off may end up exponential, but at least that's a slope :D

On the subject of "cheat-sheets" for EQ-ing, you could try using a spectrum analyser or even a spectrogram on a laptop to help you see where the dominant frequencies are.

I used this little plug-in yesterday to tame the sound and harmonics of a bell as unobtrusively as I could...








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Like to point out that it's more common practice to roll off vocal frequencies at 125Hz, not 50Hz. Nobody is gonna complain about having 'not enough sub' on vocals, and it clears the way for a good drum and bass low-end that you actually can define by just listening, instead of feeling.
 

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Like to point out that it's more common practice to roll off vocal frequencies at 125Hz, not 50Hz. Nobody is gonna complain about having 'not enough sub' on vocals, and it clears the way for a good drum and bass low-end that you actually can define by just listening, instead of feeling.
"-ish" -you should use your ears ;)

+1 about not needing sub on vocals, but don't cut without listening also.

I start at "about" 100 Hz, but it's very dependent on the vocal itself, and often what accompanies it. Naked vocal might need some of that bottom end (or at least have it controlled rather than removed), but some mixes might allow 125Hz or even higher to be rolled off. As is the same with all EQ "cheats", use your ears, and check it in the context of the mix, not just on it's own...


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On the subject of "cheat-sheets" for EQ-ing, you could try using a spectrum analyser or even a spectrogram on a laptop to help you see where the dominant frequencies are.
Well spoken, planetnine.

Cheat sheets can be helpful. Direct knowledge can be, too. Voxengo's SPAN plug-in is free, an excellent real-time spectrum analyzer plug-in that helps you see the frequencies involved with a sound, helps you figure out what to boost and cut. It is the one plug-in I have running ALL THE TIME while recording and mixing.

Don't forget to use your ears. I enjoy going to local clubs to hear local and traveling bands, it is sad how many sound-reinforcement-type-people take the approach of "make everything as loud as possible," usually with abysmal results.
 
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