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Hi I have recently purchased the FBQ2496 for the purpose of eliminating feedback when perfoming live karaoke.

On the face of it, the FBQ2496 works well in suppressing feedback when performing karaoke. The FBQ is between the mixer output and the speakers input.

My question is this:

I dj with a pair Of W Audio PSR15A Active speakers (full range) and I was wondering if I could just improve the bass response a little better with the FBQ2496 when not performing karaoke?

The PSR15A response is:

-3db 45hz~18khz

and the range is

-10db 40hz~20khz

It seems such as shame to have the FBQ2496 sitting there when I just dj.

I'm assuming I can choose a parametric filter, choose a frequency, choose the level of amplification. I'm assuming I can start at 40hz and up.

Am I going in the right direction with my thinking or should I not bother going down this avenue of thought?

Thank you in advance.
 

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I'm assuming I can choose a parametric filter, choose a frequency, choose the level of amplification. I'm assuming I can start at 40hz and up.
You also need to set the bandwidth of the filter, in addition to gain and frequency.
You have to be careful with gain filters. They tend to eat up your headroom, especially when you're trying to create something that isn't there. If you're down 10db at 40Hz and you feel you can get that 10dB with a filter, you're making a mistake. You may gain a bit, but I would never go above 5dB with a gain filter.

The filters are better served by using cuts to counteract room modes that create unpleasant sounding peaks.

brucek
 

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The PSR15A response is:

-3db 45hz~18khz

and the range is

-10db 40hz~20khz
Feel free to ignore the frequency response specs. Speakers like these typically fall like a brick below about 80 Hz, often as high as 125 Hz. On the top end, they seldom extend above about 12-14 kHz.

So a 40 Hz filter would be way to low. You might dial in a filter with a 1/2-octave bandwidth, boost 6 dB or so and play some music with a good bass signal at a moderate volume. Start at about 50 Hz or so and raise the frequency until you hit the “sweet spot” where the bass level increases. I’m guessing that will be somewhere between 60-80Hz.

At that point you can re-adjust the boost until the bass level fits your needs. Just be aware that boosting the bass with an equalizer, or even the mixer’s bass knob, will place greater demands on both the amplifiers and the woofer, which means you may not be able to play the speakers as loud as you did before, before distortion starts. So don’t over do it.

Regards,
Wayne
 
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