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...ok, I lied, I need a ton of help.

This is my first attempt ever at anything related to DIY audio. Thus, I went for the relatively inexpensive Dayton SD315-88. From what thickness/type of MDF, to screws, to what kind of saw would be best; I'm pretty unsure of it all. I suppose it would be best if I just jump into the questions I have.

First of all, should I go with a sealed or ported enclosure? This sub is just going to be working in a 2.1 setup that I have connected to my PC. I primarily use it for listening to music and gaming. I have a Behringer EP-1500 that I plan to use to power the sub. What thickness of MDF should I look for? As far as tools, what kind of saw do you guys recommend? A lot of people have told me that a jigsaw will suffice. I'm hoping to spend less than $150 in the saw department if at all possible. I'm guessing I will need a few clamps as well, any particular brand/type that is a favorite?

When it comes to modeling, I'm not sure where to start either. I know that WinISD is a favorite, but I've only played with it a couple of times and am not very familiar with how to use it properly. I found a post by a member named whines and it appears he built an enclosure for this exact same sub. Is he still around here? :p I saw another post by BoomieMCT and he made an enclosure for this sub, but his enclosure was more for a HT setup and was not a box like I want to build.

I realize there are probably a million more questions I'll come up with. I really appreciate all the help.
 

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The SD315-88 likes a ported enclosure. For music and gaming 3 cu. ft. tuned to 30 hz looks good. You'll need a 4 inch diameter port 9.5 inches long. A Behringer EP-1500 is way too much amp for this sub. You will really need to be careful. The model shows an input power of 150 watts with the sub at it's Xmax. You'll need a Hi-Pass filter at 30 hz to protect the sub from over excursion, I'm assuming the EP-1500 has one as I know trhe EP2500 does. Check the manual to make sure.

As for tools, the quality of the finished cabinet is dependant on your ability to cut a straight line. A jig saw can be used for cutting out the driver hole, I would personally use a circular saw and a straight edge for cutting the panels. Cabinet construction can be either glue and screws or glue and clamps. If using screws you will have to pre drill a pilot hole and the counter sink or the MDF will split. 3/4" MDF is recommeded.

DS315.JPG
 
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