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Discussion Starter #1
I've seen bits and pieces of this information posted around, but never the whole thing at once and nobody really answered when I used to ask. So here's a simple chart that's useful for neutral Grey's and general brightness comparison.

These numbers assume a flat/matte (lambertian) screen/surface.

N10----1.0gain
N9.5----0.9gain
N9-----0.79gain
N8.5----0.68gain
N8-----0.59gain
N7.5----0.5gain
N7-----0.43gain
N6.5----0.37gain
N6-----0.3gain
N5.5----0.24gain
N5-----0.2gain
N4.5----0.16gain
N4-----0.12gain
N3.5----0.09gain
N3-----0.07gain
N2.5----0.05gain
N2-----0.03gain
N1.5----0.02gain
N1-----0.01gain

For reference, duct-tape is about N6.
Many white-looking surfaces range from N8.5-N9.5.
Generally N3.5 and below looks black.

Gain and reflectance is easy..1.0gain is 100% as reflective as a perfectly white flat/matte, 0.5gain is 50%, 0.2gain is 20% and so on.
 

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:TT

I would like to add only that these reppresent the values of gain in pure form. Depends then on finish to raise it accordingly (matte, flat, eggshell, satin).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
An additional tool that can help to some degree.
When looking at a particular color on your monitor, it'll almost always be an inaccurate representation of how it'll look in reality..so keep that in mind.

On the positive side, because these will look exactly the same kind of inaccurate on your monitor as any other shade on the same monitor, you can use this and the built-in "paint" program (or close side-by-side windows) to copy/paste any color you find online and see where it falls in-line with these numbers.
So it'll help find the rough corresponding N-value and gain-value of a shade/color on your computer.

 

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