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The purpose of this thread will be the development of screen mixes to be used on flexible screen surfaces such as a roll-up screen. Standard interior house paints are not designed to take this much movement and flex. While exterior house paints have been used successfully by some, they are not designed to be used in this manner. I want to explore base solutions that are designed to be even more flexible than these.

The first testing I have done along these lines has been to add Liquitex Fabric Medium to the standard Black Widow mix. This testing is in the very early stages, but already I have found the high gloss nature of the Liquitex Fabric Medium (LFM for short) to be a problem. Liquitex suggests adding this medium to acrylic paints starting with a 1:1 ratio. I have found that even with concentrations as low as 20% LFM the added gloss may be enough to cause hot-spotting. While LFM dries very clear and flexible, another medium will have to be added as well to control gloss.

More info will be added as development continues.
 

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As I have previously posted I have used painted window shades for over a year. None of them displayed any form of "cracking" or "flaking" tendencies.

The five main issues I empirically found was:
1/ Shrinking. The flexible screen must be either pre-painted or you have to take the shrinking into account.
2/ curving during curing and shrinking. I painted (rolled) only one side. When curing the painted side shrunk with the effect that the whole screen became bent (like a heated bi-metal). This was countered by painting the backside as well to let that shrink.
3/ curving during time. Of some reason the screen that was flat at first began after say 6-8 months to curve at the far sides of the screen. Dunno why.
4/ A surprise, but logical. When painting a flexible screen you add weight to the substrate. My first attempt became so heavy that the window blind fixture eventually broke during rolling up.
5/ I added a iron bar at the lower end to keep it stretched. Well it did that very well but it also made it impossible to have the screen "rolled up" as the weight of the iron bar pulled down the screen. I replaced it with a lighter aluminum ditto.

Well, thats my 25cent of flexible experiments :)

I shall try to find what kind of paint I used as it did not crack or flake.
 

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Thanks for the post Robert. It's interesting that you were able to use regular latex house paint on a window shade (I assume it was made of vinyl) and roll it up and down without it cracking or flaking off. While I have not actually tried this myself, I understand that others have and have had these problems with American paints.

I have sprayed a BW mix with added matte medium. I'll report on it when it has had time to dry and cure a bit. I sprayed a common vinyl window shade with it, and from the appearance in room light, it looks to have promise!
 

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The purpose of this thread will be the development of screen mixes to be used on flexible screen surfaces such as a roll-up screen. Standard interior house paints are not designed to take this much movement and flex. While exterior house paints have been used successfully by some, they are not designed to be used in this manner. I want to explore base solutions that are designed to be even more flexible than these.

The first testing I have done along these lines has been to add Liquitex Fabric Medium to the standard Black Widow mix. This testing is in the very early stages, but already I have found the high gloss nature of the Liquitex Fabric Medium (LFM for short) to be a problem. Liquitex suggests adding this medium to acrylic paints starting with a 1:1 ratio. I have found that even with concentrations as low as 20% LFM the added gloss may be enough to cause hot-spotting. While LFM dries very clear and flexible, another medium will have to be added as well to control gloss.

More info will be added as development continues.
I have an extra Dalite high power screen (manual pull down) that I am not going to sell so once you get a formula if you need a tester on a "actual screen" I be happy to give it a shot....

I already have a replacement screen but am always curious.
 
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