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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, all,

My name is Eric Bragg. I am 45, living near Fort Smith, AR.

I started as a songwriter/musician in school, playing piano and singing; everything from choir to rock & roll bands. Joined the military in the 80's and was stationed in England, started a band that played all the "challenging stuff" - Rush, Yes, Kansas, Styx, Pink Floyd.

After my 4 year tour, I got out and earned a degree in Electrical Engineering. I specialized in digital signal processing, due to my interest in DAW software. Along the way, I took some Mechanical Engineering classes in acoustics.

I worked in the field of electrical engineering for about 10 years, during which I delved into live music for a while, then decided to build a business in recording. After 5 years, I and a colleague held the exclusive recording and live sound contract for the Indianapolis Men's and Women's Choirs. We also recorded live jazz and orchestral music around the city, while sponsoring some underground local artists and holding shows in the Fountain Square (artistic district) ... where I lived: thus the name of my business, "Fountain Square House". It was an evening and weekend business, as I remained a software design geek during normal business hours.

In late 2005, I gave up my electronics profession and accepted a full-time position as manager/first engineer at Encounter Music, Inc., a small commercial recording studio in Fort Smith, AR. After about a year, I convinced the directors to expand the studio layout. I designed and treated all the rooms, created an internship schedule and taught hands-on and classroom physics, as applied toward studio electronics, acoustic treatment, mixing techniques, and client relationships.

I left the position at Encounter to open my own business, along with my wife, the financial guru. As of today, we have about 1 week's worth of work remaining to complete the studio, under my original business name (mentioned above).

My knowledge is limited in actual equipment - I seem to do a little better in fundamental theories and such. But I believe I have a decent handle on technique. As we say in engineering, "After all, if you've learned one programming language, you've learned them all." So I say, "If you've learned one DAW, you've learned them all."

I've used Cakewalk, Logic, Cubase, ProTools, and a handful of others. My personal choice is Cubase, though I keep ProTools on hand. I prefer a modular setup, using a 24 channel control surface and outboard preamps & converters.

I love teaching & helping others learn, but am not sure, honestly, if I can make the time, over the long haul, with you guys. But I will do my best! Glad to meet you all.
 

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Welcome Eric, nice to meet you :)

Where were you stationed in England? I'm a Limey currently in Chicago.....

And I look forward to hearing your tips on recording a choir/chorus. I sing with a local chorus and its miles away from the music I'm used to, so very different to anything I've recorded before....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello, Jonathan! Yes, I was stationed at R.A.F. Alconbury, Huntingdon Cambridgeshire. The base is shut down and the last google satellite pic I saw of the area, the runway was a parking lot!!!

I absolutely loved the U.K. I and my buddies went to London often (about an hour's train ride south), but usually visited Peterboro or Cambridge, which were each about 20 minute's drive.

So how do you like that downtown Chicago driving? Makes a person quite aggressive, I have to say - if you don't want to be run over or be stuck forever in one spot!

Yes, the choral genre is quite a different beast. Different equipment, different techniques - just a totally different mindset. But here's what I liked about it: it can pay about the same as the popular genres, but you have to play a little politics and be patient to get in to those types of organizations... and you need to start at a low rate and SLOWLY raise the rates after they become confident that you are dependable... and STILL give them a lot of warning up front about your income needs. Those organizations are much more bureaucratic than anything I've seen, and there's a lot of red tape - changes are slow.

Another down side is that the equipment used is more precise and more expensive - but that's a decent trade-off, because you don't need as much equipment. Less is more. And if you do it right, and the performance goes well, there's really not a lot of work involved. In a sense, the equipment sort of pays for itself.
 

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Eric,
nice to have you! we are always looking for help in our DIY and studio construction forums. If you have a chance drop by!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, guys. Nice to meet you, as well. Will certainly stop by those threads - it's one of my favorite areas! Thanks for the invitation.
 
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