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Hi,

I’m in the process of planning a total renovation of our old house and have a room in mind for a home theater.
Current room size (W x L x H): 2,8m x 5m x 2,18m or 9.2ft x 16.5ft x 7.2ft
Currently the room is a basement room with three walls in concrete with thin layer of plaster and the fourth wall is a normal drywall.
Plan is to build a room-in-room solution in the end.
My questions for the group are:
1) Any concerns about room dimensions (distorting sound waves etc.)?
2) Any knowledge on roughly how much space I’ll loose with a room-in-room solution (W x L x H)?
3) For minimal loss of space I thought about the Dreamscreen U-boats for floor and Prosilence clips for walls and ceiling. Anyone have any experience or concerns with such a system?
4) Any other comments, concerns or things I should be aware of?
5) I'm particularly concerned abouth the width of the room, anyone else running narrow rooms with success?
 

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Hi,

I’m in the process of planning a total renovation of our old house and have a room in mind for a home theater.
Current room size (W x L x H): 2,8m x 5m x 2,18m or 9.2ft x 16.5ft x 7.2ft
Currently the room is a basement room with three walls in concrete with thin layer of plaster and the fourth wall is a normal drywall.
Plan is to build a room-in-room solution in the end.
My questions for the group are:
1) Any concerns about room dimensions (distorting sound waves etc.)?
2) Any knowledge on roughly how much space I’ll loose with a room-in-room solution (W x L x H)?
3) For minimal loss of space I thought about the Dreamscreen U-boats for floor and Prosilence clips for walls and ceiling. Anyone have any experience or concerns with such a system?
4) Any other comments, concerns or things I should be aware of?
5) I'm particularly concerned abouth the width of the room, anyone else running narrow rooms with success?
Hi,
If you are going to renovate your old house then you should hire a good experienced contractor for this work. Because you have to replace house roof and it is difficult to do.
 

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For room dimensions... YES, choosing room finished dimensions can make a BIG difference. Every room dimension will have "room modes". So a room with dimensions of 5m x 5m x 5m would have 3 sets of room modes, all at the same frequencies so this would be THE WORST room possible. 5mx5mx6m would be better, but you would still have VERY strong room modes from 2 dimensions. The best options will have maybe 5.27m x 6.3m x 3.77m -- different in each room dimension. But you can go 1 step farther and create a spreadsheet that displays room modes for each dimension you enter. Then play with the room dimensions so the "room modes" are "spread apart" and do not stack up at some specific frequency. I did that for a room in a house designed for us by an architect, and that room sounded different than ANY other room in that house. Even before drywall and insulation were installed... you could tell that the sound in the room was quite good (that room was 19.5 feet wide, 23.5 feet deep, and the ceiling height was 10.5 feet. After the insulation and drywall, it was amazing. You also want the room to be symmetrical from left to right. If there is a door or window on the left side, there should be a door or window of the same size and materials on the right side of the room. Front and back walls should also be similarly symmetrical. The slope of the ceiling should be symmetrical (if the ceiling is not flat) left-right... but the ceiling could change from front to back as long as the change was the same on the left and right. You are talking about a HUGE subject with a number of worthwhile things you can do to improve the finished room you will have. Acoustic needs inside the room and goals for external acoustic performance can have WILDLY different "needs" and those "needs" can sometimes be the opposite of what you think you were going to try to accomplish on your own. I spent time here and there over a year deciding how to best-specify the room I wanted the architect to create in that new house. If you want sound isolation from other rooms... the BEST isolation is products that have NO "hard" components. For drywall, if you assemble it with screws or nails, those are conduits for noise transmission. The more of them you can eliminate, the more sound isolation you will have. There is a vibration absorbing drywall adhesive made by Green Glue that is strong enough to hang drywall without screws or nails. You glue the first layer to the wood or metal studs and wait for the green-glue to set. Then you apply more green glue on the drywall, and apply a second layer of drywall, held in place with some supports pushing the new sheet of drywall firmly to the first sheet of drywall. This second layer of drywall helps stop sound transmission--and not using metal fasteners also helps stop sound transmission.
 
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