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Hello Again!

Just received my Onkyo HT-S894 system and found out it even comes with one HDMI cable! My question is that the Quick Setup guide shows only having to hook up one HDMI from TV to receiver and one HDMI from receiver to DVD player. Is it really that simple for optimal audio & video??? Is the real challenge coordinating the inputs, remote, etc.???
Thanks!!!!!!!!!
Bob
 

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Is it really that simple? You tell us... :)
Actually, it should be. You should be able to hook up your HDMI devices to your AVR, have the AVR play the audio, and have a single HDMI carry the video to your display.

Be Sure to read the Manual, several times if you have to. I've had the same AVR for about 7 years now, and still pull out the manual about once a year.
 

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Thanks! You are right, the manual is more than something to put under your knees for cushion!! Finally have sound coming out of everything, but I know I'm not "there" yet. A first question, we tried a long time to finally get sound out of the TV. Finally figured out that since I don't have a cable box, that cable is just coming straight into the TV (I figured out how to get digital stations without paying for it).
But no audio because it comes through on "exit" which is at the top of the list of video 1, video 2, etc. We had to hook up the optical cable to get audio. How do I program "exit" to go thru HDMI??
Thanks!!
Bob
 

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The HDMI connection from your AVR, carrying audio and video to your TV, can not carry audio back to your AVR from your TV. In that regard, it's a one-way street. If your TV has HDMI out, then you can connect that to your AVR's audio in. Odds are, though, that it doesn't, and you'll need to use the optical audio cable.
 

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Should the cable TV run directly to the AVR instead of the TV to get optimal audio & video? I am assuming that if you have a cable box that is how you would do it? If so, I don't see anywhere to hook up standard cable TV cable to AVR, is there an adapter?? Thanks!!
Bob
 

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If you have a cable box, I'd hook it directly to the AVR just to have less cables running around. However, if you get standard cable (no cable box), or want to take advantage of over the air or Clear QAM, you'll need to run co-ax to your TV, and then Optical from the TV to the AVR for sound.
 

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So what good actually is the HDMI connection from the AVR to the TV if cable is running to the TV and optical from the TV to AVR?
Thanks!
 

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So what good actually is the HDMI connection from the AVR to the TV if cable is running to the TV and optical from the TV to AVR?
Thanks!
It gives you better video quality than S-video and composite by a long shot, and arguable better than Component, depending on your source (in other cases, component will will look identical/better). It's also needed for displaying video from upconverted DVDs (players disable anything above 480p using component out for a million dumb reasons that I won't get into.)
 

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So there is not that much of a difference between HDMI audio & optical? Also, there are settings for hz(?) for each speaker along with settings from -12 to plus 12 for each speaker. What is the difference in these two settings?
Thanks again (and again)!!
 

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For up to Dolby Digital and DTS, there is no difference, none. Now when they start broadcasting Dolby TrueHD, it'll be a different story, but that day will probably never come.

The settings on those speakers are for the crossover. You should probably read up on the guides posted here: http://www.hometheatershack.com/forums/home-theater-systems/4083-setting-up-your-home-theater-101-a.html

But the short version goes like this (please forgive me is I sound elementary or patronizing, that's not my intention).

In the very basic, Frequency measure in Hertz goes like this. Low bass sounds are heard from about 200HZ down, Mid range goes from 200-1000, and 1000 on up to 20,000, or 20K is treble (these ranges are made up by me and are not hard and fast by any means).

So, those crossover setting in your AVR determine what frequencies are handles by your Main speakers, and what frequencies are handled by your subwoofer. In otherwords, if your crossover is set to 100HZ, and a 200HZ sound comes through, it will be played by your mains. If a 50HZ sound comes through, it will be played by your subwoofer.

So, what you want to do is look at the specs of your speakers (check the manual for your speakers). They will have a spec called frequency response which will read something like: 120hz - 20,000hz +/- 3db. Your sub will have a similar figure, probably something like 30hz-180hz +/- 3db. What you want to do is set the crossover so that it falls within both of those ranges, in this case, 150hz would be a good choice.

Now to the second part of your question. Each of your speaker channels, LCRS, has a level, or volume setting. You need to go out to Radioshack, buy an analog SPL meter, and then sit in your chair with the SPL meter on to the 70 range. Hold itup by your head, pointed at the intersection of your ceiling and front wall, and push the button on your AVR's remote labeled "test tones". Static (pink noise, actually) will start coming through your speakers, first from the Left, then center, then right...

Turn up the volume until all the speakers measure about 75db. Then, using the individua setting from -12db to +12db, change the vlume of each individual speaker until each reads exactly 75db.

Press the test tone button again, and the pink noise will stop. Then you're done.

If your AVR has some sort of auto setting with an included microphone, just run that, but I always like to double check the setting it chooses for my crossovers and channel levels.
 

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..., there are settings for hz(?) for each speaker along with settings from -12 to plus 12 for each speaker. What is the difference in these two settings? ...
Are you sure is Hz not db??? ... usually the settings for each speaker is "db" -12 to +12; and that is used to increase or lower the volume of each speaker :yes::yes:

I found online that tour HT S894 came with the Audyssey EQ: ( Audyssey EQ is activated by pressing the dedicated button on the accompanying remote control. This pre-calibrated solution was created in the Audyssey laboratories, and the end user does not need to go through the whole process. And while most systems only address frequency response, Audyssey EQ also focuses on the time domain (where most of the problems lie) in the entire listening area. The results are immediately obvious); this is to calibrate your speakers (the volume will be the same for each, here is where -12 to +12 is used).

Just connect the microphone that came with your receiver, follow the instructions to use Audyssey EQ and let it auto calibrate ... then enjoy :bigsmile: :T
 
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