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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm wondering how widespread the HDMI board failures are among different manufacturers and would like to know if this has been solved or if there's been no real progress. I've had 2 Onkyos, 3 generations apart, fail like clockwork at 2 years. Naturally, I've done a lot of looking online for help and see that reports of this issue with Onkyo are rampant and have persisted for more than 5 years. This has given me a very bad taste for Onkyo although I have loved their products otherwise.

While looking for a replacement for my most recent failure I'm wondering of this issue is widespread, perhaps universal, among manufacturers. It's difficult to throw down a grand or two on a piece of equipment with this in the back of my mind.

Have any manufacturers been able to dodge this bullet? Low end? High end?

Have Onkyo or anyone else solved this problem yet?
 

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its less likely in other brands but failures of HDMI boards have been reported in all brands across the board. Sherwood\Newcastle, Yamaha, Sony and even Denon have had failures as of recent.
There has been speculation that failures can be caused by bad grounding of network or cable lines and heat is a big one. Poor airflow around the receiver is a big cause of failure. I know at last a few owners of the problem Onkyos that are going on several years without issues. My 805 is now almost 10 years old and not one issue and it was reported to burst into flames among other issues LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
There has been speculation that failures can be caused by bad grounding of network or cable lines and heat is a big one. Poor airflow around the receiver is a big cause of failure.
Those would make sense. However I doubt this is the root problem. I live in a new house; have whole house surge suppression on incoming power, phone, and CATV (no other wires enter my house); everything is very well grounded; my theater is served by six dedicated 20A circuits fed from the same phase on the same panel; and both Onkyos spent their entire lives on a wire (Metro) shelf that is totally open on all 4 sides (and several inches above and below) in a large basement storage room that never gets above 75F, ever. If environmental factors are to blame then they are selling a very fragile product. I think it is a combination of design "Value Engineering" and poor QC.

I'm very curious to know how the different manufacturers compare.
 

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Well, just doing a quick google on "Denon HDMI board failure" it appears that they also have a problem across a wide range of there receivers. Stick Marantz in the search or any of the other brands and you get hits as well.

HDMI is very fragile it seems. Another thought is unplugging the HDMI cable when powered on. No matter what the cause it's a big problem across the board.

75 is not that cool particularly if the space where the receiver is is not open at the back or a fan is not moving air through the receiver. A receivers internal temp can get as high as 90F even if the surrounding area is much cooler.
 

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Well, just doing a quick google on "Denon HDMI board failure" it appears that they also have a problem across a wide range of there receivers. Stick Marantz in the search or any of the other brands and you get hits as well.

HDMI is very fragile it seems. Another thought is unplugging the HDMI cable when powered on. No matter what the cause it's a big problem across the board.

75 is not that cool particularly if the space where the receiver is is not open at the back or a fan is not moving air through the receiver. A receivers internal temp can get as high as 90F even if the surrounding area is much cooler.
75 is a *very* reasonable ambient condition for a home electronic which sits on an open wire shelf with nothing impeding air circulation on all 6 sides. If these are designed to require a cooler environment in order to last more than 800 hrs of actual use then they need more robust components or a better cooling system.

Understand that this closet is usually in the mid 60's. It rarely gets to 70 and never, not on a hot August afternoon at the end of a Lord of the Rings marathon, does it get above 75. Ever.

But your point is taken about this not being an Onkyo exclusive. That's what troubles me the most.
 
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