Home Theater Forum and Systems banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have posted this question on another forum and received mixed answers. I hope someone here can help shed some light on my question.

I just purchased my Sanyo Z2000 projector and am ready to install it. I am building a DW laminate screen that will be between 110" to 120". I am unsure how far back to put the projector and how I should/should not use the zoom to get my desired image size. My basement is pretty dark at night, so light is not really an issue.

I used the calculator at Projector Central and it says that at 14' I can obtain an image size of 112" and still have the recommended brightness. This is with a 1.0 gain...which I understand that my DW will give me a better gain than that.

How do you guys go about hanging your projector and determing how far back to put it...how much to zoom/not zoom...how you got your image to look it's best and still get the size you want? There is really not a guide on how to do this and I am such a newb when it comes to projectors.

The bottom line is that I want the best image possible and still get the image size that I desire.

Any help is certainly (and greatly) appreciated!

Thanks,
Troy
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,054 Posts
With my older Sanyo Z2 I mounted it as close as i could to the screen to get the 96" size I wanted with about 2" to play with in case I ever want to go a bit bigger. You want the projector to be as close as it can be to the screen with the zoom off so that you get the brightest image possible for the size you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
I found it helped me to put the projector on a table for a week, and play with it there, before using a plumb bob and mounting it exactly overhead from the best location I found with the table.

I know it's best to have the zoom at minimum, but I gave myself a bit of fudge factor by giving it the slightest bump up from minimum, so I had some correction factor after mounting. That little bit will never be visible.
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
My biggest question is having put in the right place (distance) to get the maximum quality and still get my image size....does that make sense?

I guess I will put it around 13' to 14' feet and see what I get (image size) without using the zoom.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,054 Posts
I guess I will put it around 13' to 14' feet and see what I get (image size) without using the zoom.
Yes, that is correct, give yourself a little movement on the zoom just in case.
 

·
Elite Shackster , HTS Moderator Emeritus
Joined
·
2,216 Posts
I have been spoiled. In three installations of projectors, all had lens shift ability, so you didn't have to be "dead on" with the alignment.

The calculator is always a good first start. From there, I would try a scaffold or temporary brace to test the location from a zoom/brightness perspective.

Then use a laser plumb bob (self balancing, sends a laser beam up as well as spinning around the room for level). This can do two things for you: 1) gives you a level reference line for the screen and 2) gives you a perfect center spot for the projector. You will have to verify measurements and such to make sure the laser level is perfectly centered on your screen.

Also, check on the features of various mounts. Most have pan, tilt, and "roll" adjustments to get the angles just right. All this should get you really close. Worst case, design in some "slop" in the screen placement so you can shift that a 1/2" or so left or right if necessary.

Finally, make sure the screen has a good felt border (make one if it does not). This allows a little light to spill over the edges and be unnoticed. That definitely helps smooth out any alignment issues.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
Then use a laser plumb bob (self balancing, sends a laser beam up as well as spinning around the room for level). This can do two things for you: 1) gives you a level reference line for the screen and 2) gives you a perfect center spot for the projector. You will have to verify measurements and such to make sure the laser level is perfectly centered on your screen.
Wow. I'm almost embarrassed that I used a string and a chunk of steel.

Ain't tek-no-lology wunnerful? :R

I may borrow some of the fancy equipment the maintenance guys at work have in the future, but the old methods worked just fine.
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
When you talk about alignment...are we talking about just getting it centered on the wall that the screen is on? I am guessing I hang the projector first then put up my screen?
 

·
Elite Shackster , HTS Moderator Emeritus
Joined
·
2,216 Posts
First -- I've only used the laser thingy once. It was nice though. Mostly it's tape measure, stud finder, and 4' level. :)

As for order, I like to put the screen up first, since it's placement is usually more critical in the room. But I also like screens that mount with Z clips, so they can slide a bit left and right for fine tuning.

Z clips are two metal clips that look like _/- _/- One goes on the wall and the other on the screen. In some cases the mating surface is the frame of the screen itself. They hold a lot of weight, but don't fix the screen laterally (although the weight keeps it from moving easily). It gives at least a 1/2" in either direction, which is usually enough.

Once the screen is up, it's time to use some math to determine the center and distance.

1) measure the screen width and divide by 2 (X)
2) Get distance calculation from the projector calculator or the tables that might be in the manual. (D)
3) Calculate the hypotenuse length from the edge of your screen to where the projector will go. In this case it's square root of (X^2 + D^2). We'll call this H
4) Using the level or a plumb bob, mark the floor where the corners of the screen are, straight down. This will make it easier to measure for the next step.
4) With a helper measure distance H from the corner marks you just did in (4) and mark the floor with some tape. Specifically you want to trace out a little arc near where the center point might be. Repeat from the other corner mark. Where the two arcs intersect is both the proper distance AND perpendicular to your screen. Mark that on the floor and then use a plumb bob or laser plumb to mark the ceiling.

Now make sure you have a ceiling joist up there to screw into. If you barely miss it, move your mark forward. You can always use some zoom to enlarge the image. Repeat the "intersecting arcs" with the new measurement to ensure that everything still centered and square.

Bolt everything up and make small adjustments as necessary.

Good luck.
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Now make sure you have a ceiling joist up there to screw into. If you barely miss it, move your mark forward. You can always use some zoom to enlarge the image. Repeat the "intersecting arcs" with the new measurement to ensure that everything still centered and square.
Well my joist actually run toward the screen...so finding the center may be a little more tough. I do know there are things you can get that will span the joist. I guess I can also use the settings in the projector to move the image slightly left or right if need be. Although I know it's best to avoid doing that to get the best image quality.

I also need to go back to math class. I was an english guy....:nerd::dizzy:
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top