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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all...

I have hot-spotting issues on my newly-painted screen (Sherwin-Williams ProClassic Interior Acrylic Latex, Satin sheen, tinted SW6260 (Unique Gray)).

Apparently, the sheen of the Satin ProClassic paint is too much for my projector. What is a good solution to this issue? Is there a "top coat" of some kind that can be applied to cut down the glare, or do I need to find a good, neutral gray equivalent to "Unique Gray," but in a base that has flat sheen?

Thanks,

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Gotcha, Mechman. Don is suggesting Sherwin-Williams "Duration" paint, in "SW6260 Unique Gray". I'll give that a shot; do you know if Unique Gray mixed in that paint base will be similarly neutral, as compared to the "Unique Gray" in the ProClassic paint?

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #5
OK, sounds good...I'll pick up a quart of the "Duration" paint. I'll ask you what I asked Don -- you both said "one step down" in sheen, so that would be going down from satin, in the ProClassic, to a matte in the Duration. You both think that matte will eliminate the hot-spotting, without me having to drop all the way down to a flat base?

Steve
 

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OK, sounds good...I'll pick up a quart of the "Duration" paint. I'll ask you what I asked Don -- you both said "one step down" in sheen, so that would be going down from satin, in the ProClassic, to a matte in the Duration. You both think that matte will eliminate the hot-spotting, without me having to drop all the way down to a flat base?

Steve
No matte finish paint should hot spot, but then again we've never heard of the SW satin finish causing hot spotting in an N8 shade of gray or lighter.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sounds good, Don, on the matte finish. I just ordered a quart of it in Unique Gray, from SW. I'll pick it up on the way home. I guess with my projector relatively close to the screen (13'), and with a relatively small screen (92"), there are just too many lumens hitting the screen -- thus causing my hot-spotting when, in most cases, there would be none. :huh:

Meanwhile, I spoke with Mitsubishi this morning, and they are sending me a new unit, overnight shipping. They are including a return label in the box, to send mine back in -- so you can't beat that, in terms of customer service. Hopefully, now, I'll be able to adjust/calibrate this new projector, and end up with a nice bright image. That, combined with the lower-sheen paint on the screen, and I should be in business!! PERFECT! I'll report back when I get the screen re-painted, and the new projector up and running...

Thanks guys...

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #8
OK -- an update. One coat of SW "Duration" in matte finish, Unique Gray tint, and a quick test when the paint was barely dry showed NO HOT SPOTTING! Now, it's a matter of waiting on the new projector (latest news is I'm being "upgraded" to an HC4000, which should be here in a couple of days). I look forward to having this last piece of the puzzle in place, so I can calibrate and enjoy!

Thanks again for the help; the matte finish paint seems to do the trick -- at least with the HC3800 in "Cinema" mode...

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #11
ALMFamily --

It certainly does make one wonder. The only other thing I can say is, I DID thin down the ProClassic with water (for my HVLP sprayer), so I'm not sure if that could have resulted in a "glossier" finish than non-thinned ProClassic (I know Sherwin-Williams recommends NOT thinning their paints...)

Don --

YES, I did notice a difference...I didn't think it rolled on quite as evenly or smoothly as the ProClassic, BUT...there's a caveat. I did not thin the Duration paint. I had thinned my entire quart of ProClassic (thinking I'd be spraying the whole time, and not rolling), so when I decided to roll on that "top coat," it was using the left-over paint that had been thinned down to HVLP consistency. Having said that, that thinned-down ProClassic rolled on nice and smooth, and was easy to get consistent coverage with no roller marks, and when it dried, it laid down a nice, even, smooth, texture-free coat.

Now, when I painted on the Duration last night, I didn't thin it first. Having said that, when painting on that coat of Duration it was harder to get nice, consistent coverage, with no roller marks, etc. I had to work much harder to eliminate roller marks and keep it texture free. BUT -- I was obviously not comparing "apples to apples" given that it was not thinned.

I will probably paint on one more coat of the Duration, as -- despite my efforts -- there are just a few very minor imperfections, reflecting the fact that it was indeed a bit more difficult to apply, and apparently didn't "lay down" quite as well after application thus leaving a few spots of very minor "texturing." If and when I do apply this one final coat, I will thin it first. THEN, I'll have a better "apples to apples" comparison to share regarding rolling on the two products.

Thanks,

Steve
 

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I noticed the same thing when rolling on the Kilz primer - I did not thin it at all and I had to go over it several times to remove the texture.

As I have no experience in this arena, could it be that rolling on the thinned paint made the layer contain more water thus causing the hot spotting issues?
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
ALMFamily -- I do not think ROLLING on the thinned paint was the issue; there was no more hot-spotting when I rolled on that last coat of thinned paint, vs. the hot-spotting I was getting from the prior layer of thinned paint that was sprayed on. Both layers were giving roughly equivalent amounts of hot spotting.

SO, if thinning is something that will cause a lower-sheen paint to have a bit more sheen, it doesn't seem to me from my experience that the method of application -- rolling OR spraying that thinned paint -- makes any difference. BOTH the rolled layer of thinned paint AND the sprayed layer of thinned paint had hot-spotting.

Further, the thinning, of course, may have NOTHING to do with it; it may simply be that ProClassic satin, for my room, projector, projection distance, and screen size, is simply a finish with too much sheen. But, I'd be curious to know if rolled-on, UN-THINNED ProClassic (satin) would have caused hot spotting, given that it's now clear that the rolled-on, un-thinned Dimension (matte) does NOT...

Steve
 

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When I made up my test panel of ProClassic satin I thinned the paint about 25% with distilled water. No hot spotting occurred. I used an air compressor powered HVLP with 1.4mm nozzle.

If I understand the way ProClassic is supposed to work the thicker the coat of paint is (without running or sagging of course) the better it will flatten out. This means that you well could get a smoother finish by rolling instead of spraying, but I doubt the difference would be all that visible to the human eye.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks Don.

So, it sounds like this is at least some evidence that thinning may not increase the sheen of the paint...

Hmm...

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #18
SUCCESS!!!

First off, Don, I can now confirm that Duration does not roll on quite as nicely as the ProClassic. It's not BAD, but not quite as easy to get a nice even coat. Last night, I thinned a bit of it down, and rolled it on, and still was not happy with my finish. I still had enough "flaws" on the screen, roller marks and such, that I was not happy. So, I had to do yet ANOTHER coat, which turned out to be probably about the tenth coat of paint/primer on this screen! On this coat, though, I took something you said in your last post -- that ProClassic is supposed to flatten out better when applying a thicker coat of paint. I'm happy to say that with the Duration, that also did the trick. I applied a heavier coat of paint, and was SUPER careful with my application, and it flattened out nicely -- FINALLY my screen is "acceptably perfect." No flaws visible. THANKS for your mention of a "heavier coat of paint" in your post. That definitely did the trick for me, with the Duration paint.

Then, this morning, my new projector came. As I mentioned, they upgraded me from the Mitsubishi HC3800 to an HC4000 (they had no more stock of the 3800s left -- so I got lucky!) The moment I turned the new one on, WOW! Night and day difference, no pun intended. :) The brightness of this PJ was AMAZING. I have not yet even run it in "standard" lamp mode; I'm in low lamp Cinema mode, and it is SUPERB. VERY bright, VERY sharp, beautiful colors, and I haven't even run the calibration on this one yet. I cannot BELIEVE the difference in brightness. And the best news of all -- even this super-bright projector is giving me NO HOT-SPOTTING on my screen. FINALLY, I have the picture I'd been hoping to have -- now that I've ironed out all my screen issues and projector issues. THANKS AGAIN all, for all the help getting me to this point!

Steve
 

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Glad we could be of assistance Steve. That's what this forum is all about, helping folks get the best image they can with what they have.

Glad you had a good resolution to your PJ problems! :T It sounds like your HC3800 had some real imaging issues.
 
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