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Hello ...
We're moving into a new home and I had some a question about installing a wall mount. I have a rather heavy-duty one that I would like to re-use with my new TV, which has a rotating arm that comes out. The mount itself is about 60 lbs and the TV is 60 lbs. It mounts to 2 wood studs.

I'm just wondering ... will 4 large screws (2 per stud) be enough or should I do more? Any tips/advice? May as well do it right the first time :)
 

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If the screws came with the mount and the mount is rated for at least 60 lbs, then you're GTG :D. Well, how big are the screws? Are we talking drywall screws, 4" lag bolts, what? If you have two different size screws (i.e. two are one size and two are the other) put the larger ones in the top position.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If the screws came with the mount and the mount is rated for at least 60 lbs, then you're GTG :D. Well, how big are the screws? Are we talking drywall screws, 4" lag bolts, what? If you have two different size screws (i.e. two are one size and two are the other) put the larger ones in the top position.
I lost most of the hardware in the moves. I have to go to the hardware store and buy more screws for the wood studs.... I don't know what size/type/specialty etc.

Yes the wall mount was rated for up to 70 lb TV.
 

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A good hardware store should be able to help just tell them what you need. Are you only missing parts to the wall and not your display? I would buy a new mount if your missing parts that hold the display to be safe.
 

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For 120 lbs, I’m thinking more like four lag bolts per stud.

This shouldn't be too hard to figure out. The mounting bracket has holes for the bolts; you want to utilize all of them – IOW, if there are six mounting holes, don’t try to get away with using only four bolts.

You can call the manufacturer and find out what size bolts they recommend. Failing that, take the bracket to a hardware store and find the largest-diameter bolt that will fit through the mounting holes, but use bolts that are one size smaller. (This will allow for “wriggle room” to adjust the bracket for level, in case you don’t get the holes drilled quite perfectly.) For the length I recommend getting at least 1-1/4” into the stud. Be sure and account for the thickness of the sheetrock and the bracket itself.

Regards,
Wayne

 

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I agree with wayne. take the back plate to the hardware store and find the biggest lag screws (3.5-4 inches long) that will fit through the holes... most likely 1/4 inch wide or 3/8 inch wide lag bolts will be all you can fit. run a pilot hole for the lag screws and crank those suckers in...
 

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Um....

A standard 1/4" lag screw has a maximum shear load rating of nearly 300lbs. That's per screw. Each has a pullout strength in wood of at least 125 lbs. Again, each.

4 1/4" lag screws will be fine.
 

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Um....

A standard 1/4" lag screw has a maximum shear load rating of nearly 300lbs. That's per screw. Each has a pullout strength in wood of at least 125 lbs. Again, each.

4 1/4" lag screws will be fine.
with ease. basically most mounts will only fit a 1/4 wide lag screw... some will do a 3/8, but those are beefy.
 
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