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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi
I have the monitor audio silver RX package with RX6 for fronts and RXFX at the back.

I was just wondering if someone could give me some help or a breakdown of the full tech spec of these speakers so I can get a better understanding of how speakers are driven. I would really appreciate if someone could elaborate regarding Frequency Response: 38Hz-35kHz- what does this actually mean? Would this be considered good or bad? What should we be looking at here to get close to reference?

Sensitivity [email protected] : 90dB ??
Maximum SPL (dBA) 114.8 ??
Tweeter Crossover: LF 700Hz, MF/HF 2.7kHz ??

I'm not sure what all this means, tried googling it but couldn't find a technical description in laymans terms lol.

Also when I setup my AVR I set all speakers to Small with crossover at 80Hz, is that okay?

What crossover do I need to select if I wanted to get bit more bass outta my fronts? Currently all speakers are at 80Hz.
 

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The frequency response (35hz to 38000hz) are the range of tones that the speaker can produce. 20hz being the lower limit of human hearing, and 20000hz the upper limit. Sensitivity is the volume produced with one watt input. It's used to compare speakers. A higher rating means a speaker will play louder with a given input volume. The max spl is the loudest that speaker measured at the max recommended input. The other figures are the built in crossover points, determining where the mid bass stops, and the tweeter picks up. As for your bass question, you didn't mention wether or not you have a sub. Most of these numbers are to compare speakers before buying. If you already have them, these numbers don't mean much because they would measure very differently in your room.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The frequency response (35hz to 38000hz) are the range of tones that the speaker can produce. 20hz being the lower limit of human hearing, and 20000hz the upper limit. Sensitivity is the volume produced with one watt input. It's used to compare speakers. A higher rating means a speaker will play louder with a given input volume. The max spl is the loudest that speaker measured at the max recommended input. The other figures are the built in crossover points, determining where the mid bass stops, and the tweeter picks up. As for your bass question, you didn't mention wether or not you have a sub. Most of these numbers are to compare speakers before buying. If you already have them, these numbers don't mean much because they would measure very differently in your room.
Thanks for the really helpful reply Chris.

I have a subwoofer setup at 80Hz, for movies it sounds fantastic.
For music I feel there's either too much bass or the bass is slightly off or a few nanoseconds behind the rest of the music.
If I switch it to "Pure Direct" on my yamaha receiver, it knocks the sub off and audio is output through front L/R only, that's why I was wondering if you could adjust the crossover on the fronts to send some low frequencies there.

Why is it with subs a lot of people mention 60/40 and 20Hz, to me the sub sounds best at 80Hz.
When you go lower to 60/40Hz, is the sub meant to go lower and sound deeper?
 

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Hello,
Chris nailed it. Things like maximum SPL is somewhat useless as all Rooms are different. Given the Frequency Response, 80hz should sound great and the MA is an excellent Company.
Cheers,
JJ
 

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If you are using Pure Direct you are by-passing all bass management and the receiver should be sending a full range signal to your main speakers. You cannot adjust the crossover to send more bass to the speakers. If there is not enough bass that means your speakers are not capable of producing it. Some receivers do allow subwoofer use in Pure and Pure Direct modes. If your Yamaha does not have a setting for this then you would probably be better off using stereo mode and a subwoofer.

120Hz, 100Hz, 80Hz, 60Hz, 40Hz and 20Hz are common subwoofer crossover settings in most receivers. When you set your sub crossover lower that does not mean you get a lower or deeper sound. Basically if you set your crossover to 60Hz then everything from 60Hz on down goes to the subwoofer and everything above goes to your speaker. Of course that is not a hard and fast frequency cut off as there are other things that affect the in-room response such as; speaker roll-off, proximity to walls, the room itself, etc.
 

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If the sub is properly setup, it should blend the same with music as it does with movies. Yamaha receivers have a ton of effect settings, so you can experiment with those to help. Pure direct probably isn't for you, as the RX6 isn't really full range. If you don't mind me asking, what have you used to setup the sub? SPL meter? Auto setup? By ear?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I used a RadioShack SPL meter.
I have a high level lead for the sub hopefully I'll get around to connecting it up tomorrow.
 
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