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It could definitely help your sound quality, but it will depend on your setup.
What is the input of the system? iPod, Computer(FLAC, MP3, AAC), Turntable
What kind of speakers do you have?
Do you want to expand to have more channels later?

Do you have a way to measure the output of the speakers? SPL Meter, Computer with REW

An equalizer can help you make the frequency response chart of your setup flatter across the frequencies, but if you are playing low-bitrate compressed audio on a set of $20 speakers then you aren't going to notice the change the equalizer makes.
 

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It can make a difference however that particular brand is not really the highest of quality and may introduce noise. You also need to be cautious that you dont add too many filters that are different as that can really mess up the imaging of the speakers.
 

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I have not played with an equalizer like that (similar to that) since 1980, brings back great memories of my youth.
An equalizer might help, but fiddling with it by ear is probably not the best method.
HAHA I laugh at myself for saying that because my buddies and I spent many hazy hours playing with the equalizer dialing in the "best" sound.

Two speakers and a sub is a 2.1 system and a left center and right speaker are a 3 channel system.
Tell us all your gear.
You may already have an equalizer built into your equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I dont have a EQ built into my system. I have a set of speakers that a friend of mine designed for me R and L with built in cross overs in them. They sound full and great. They are a dayton 7" driver with a 1" silk dome tweeter. Amp is an old pioneer 2 ch with only treble and bass adjustments. External sound D1 24-bit DAC by audioengine. Sub is a single 10" powered with a dayton plate amp.
I play most of my music from laptop using grooveshark. I just always hear a separation in the mid range between the R&L and the sub. I just don't get that smooth transition between the sub and the rest.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It could definitely help your sound quality, but it will depend on your setup.
What is the input of the system? iPod, Computer(FLAC, MP3, AAC), Turntable
What kind of speakers do you have?
Do you want to expand to have more channels later?

Do you have a way to measure the output of the speakers? SPL Meter, Computer with REW

An equalizer can help you make the frequency response chart of your setup flatter across the frequencies, but if you are playing low-bitrate compressed audio on a set of $20 speakers then you aren't going to notice the change the equalizer makes.
I don't have a way to measure the output of the speakers.
 

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I have used several pieces of ART Pro Audio sound processing gear in my bi-amped party system, including the 341 EQ. I still use their CX311 crossover. IMO they are among the better value in budget priced pro components. I am very sensitive to noises and distortions, and have not had any such problems. I've received multiple compliments on the sound quality of the system from party guests, which speaks for itself.
 

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As a professional sound engineer working both live and in various studio recording facilities, I am always disappionted to see when EQ is ruled out or negatively approached for beginners or more experienced users who are pondering the idea of integrating an Equaliser in (one of) their system(s).

An Equaliser can be used effectively in various setups plugged in before the main amplifier:

1 - live venue/party/background music - to create an atmosphere where mids/highs are in balance with the ability to communicate with other guests (possibly altered when the crowd gets bigger)

2 - playing back older recordings

3 - as a tool for finding and "eliminating" problematic frequencies in one's amp/speaker setup, and to investigate the usefullness of certain contemplated acoustic treatments

4 - a cheap "solution" using it as a tool (like in 3) when one's budget is limited (which nothing to be ashamed about)

Before the EQ enters the system, one should at least do everything possible to find the optimum position and direction for the used speaker system to start modifying from there. Maximise output of your standard setup first before tweaking.

ART is a respectable brand in the professional studio community. Home Equalizers are a lot worse in phase-issues, are more noisy, have limited +/-dB action and are relatively expensive. This ART has unbalanced connectors which make it ideal to hook it up using shorter interlinks. If the item has balanced connections too (like we professionals prefer, then you can run longer lines between EQ and amp, keeping it close to your players.
 

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I just always hear a separation in the mid range between the R&L and the sub. I just don't get that smooth transition between the sub and the rest.
If your subwoofer has high line inputs I would recommend connecting the speakers through the subwoofer and using the subwoofers crossover to blend into the speakers low end.
If the subwoofer's volume is level matched to the speakers you should be able to achieve a seamless balance.
 

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If you don't have any way to measure the sound, I'm not really sure what you are going to do with the equalizer since you'll be guessing at which frequencies are louder/quieter. I would suggest getting a mic and running REW with your current setup to see if you really have a frequency response issue and if its something that could be resolved with an equalizer.

Without something to measure your setup, you're really shooting in the dark
 
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